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Dremel Tool - What used for ?

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We all have firearms & those that reload have presses, chargers, dies and molds ...

What do you use any of the Dremel Accessories for on firearms,  presses, chargers, dies or molds ...

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Everything- actually I use one for wood work but won’t let myself bring it near a gun. 

Edited by Too Tall Bob
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Like a lot of things n life used with moderation and forethought a Dremil is a useful tool

 

Sanding drums

Break the sharp edges of a SXS shotgun chambers

Thin down flat springs

Touch up places when fitting a stock that I cannot easily reach otherwise.

 

Buffing wheels

Use the various sizes and shapes along with with 5 different compounds to polish actions.

 

Abrasive Cut off wheel

Modify parts

Change the shape of a rear sight on a rifle.

Shorten screws

 

Grinding stones

Thin flat springs

 

Edited by Sedalia Dave
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My gunsmith gives Dremmel tools to all of his best customers. :P

 

Kajun

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Actually, nearly all my work on Marlins and the Henry .22 rifles are with a Dremmel.

I like the model 4000 best.

 

..........Widder

 

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If this works you can see another use for the tool. After you have burned the ends off your shotgun shells shooting black powder you can use the tool to trim off about a quarter inch and use them again by closing with a roll crimp. There are a couple roll crimped shells setting on the bed of the lathe.

Lucky

Jewellers Lathe.jpg

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Handy Dandy tool pilgrims. 

Edited by Jackrabbit Joe #414

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Excellent tool for doubling your Gunsmith Bill  :D

 

I do really like Lucky's set up for trimming Shotgun Hulls.

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In the wrong hands, they can ruin guns in flash.  Even where they are useful, they are not as good as a foredom tool, which gives you much better control.  

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I work with a Dremel making small parts.

My opinion is the Dremel in experienced hands can be a fine tool.

But after 10 years of making small parts with a Dremel, I still believe it is the most effcient tool to make perfectly good parts in to junk.

And this happened extremely fast.

 

If you want to work on your guns with a Dremel, may I suggest ordering a couple of spares before you start or maybe a new gun to replace the one your about to work on.

 

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Funny you mentioned dentistry,  when I get called to a nursing home for someone immobile I use my dremel to adjust dentures.  Bullett 19707

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I have used my portable and brass brush accessories when cleaning and I do use very slow speeds.  Haven’t had any mishaps yet and I find it reducing my cleaning time. 

Edited by Nimble Fingers SASS# 25439
Misspelling

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When it comes to this game I find the Dremel useful for cleaning and polishing, especially for my reloading presses.  A few times a year I deep clean and polish all metal parts that can become gummed up and dirty with powder residue, especially with APP.  Primer feed and powder measures clean up nicely and keep working smoothly. 

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In the wrong hands it can be used to turn a functioning fire arm into a paperweight.

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In the wrong hands it can be used to turn a functioning fire arm into a paperweight.

 

You have to be 10% smarter, than the tool you're using. :lol:

OLG 

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The Dremel is a handy tool .

But in the wrong hands or someone who think they are a gunsmith  because they have one .

They can be a danger to themselves and other shooters .

 

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Foot or knee operation is necessary for optimum control. A Dremel with a flex shaft and foot control is about as good as any. It's hard to do "fine" work if you're holding a motor in your hand!!

 

Mike

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Narrow mainspring, remove coils from coil springs, cut .45 Colt brass to CS length +.02" (later trimmed on a Lee case trimmer) and sanding sewn edges of leather goods.

Go slow.

Do not overheat steel.

Use new inserts.

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If you have to ask, don’t use one on a gun you plan to keep!

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Used mine today to blunt a sharp edge due a chip in a Fiesta Wear bowl. Now I don't have to throw away the bowl.

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I've used mine in the past week to:

1. Sharpen a chain saw 

2. Cut the coil spring feed tube for my Double Alpha Academy cartridge marker

3. Enlarged the lamp opening in a flashlight so I could install an LED bulb to replace the incandescent

 

Haven't used it on any of my guns that I can recall.  

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On 12/25/2019 at 2:29 PM, Nimble Fingers SASS# 25439 said:

I have used my portable and brass brush accessories when cleaning and I do use very slow speeds.  Haven’t had any mishaps yet and I find it reducing my cleaning time. 

Using the rotary brass brush, I hope you're diligently wearing safety glasses.  Every jeweler knows they're famous for shedding/shooting brass bristles into skin, clothing and eyes.  Being brass, the bristles don't come out of your eyes with a magnet, like steel bristles often do.  They require medical intervention. 

Aftermarket replacement eyes are not nearly as good as the original stock parts from the Maker! 

Edited by Dusty Devil Dale

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All of the Dremel tool's functions pertain to MATERIAL REMOVAL.  Putting it back takes skills with welding, soldering, or machining new parts.  Just remember that, as you contemplate using the Dremel, or equivalents, on your guns. 

 

Hand-holding any rotating material removal tool risks overheating the workpiece, over-cutting, imprecise cutting, accidental wrap-arounds that round off needed sharp edges, and removal of surface-hardened wear surfaces.  The Dremel works quickly, so take your time and check progress often.  Removing too little always has easier remedies than too much. 

But with all of that said, there are some jobs, including gunstock inletting, that are very hard to do any other way.  Properly used, Dremel is a great little work-saving tool. 

Edited by Dusty Devil Dale

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Thanks for warning others. I do use safety glasses now that I have caract surgery and don’t wear the prescription Coke bottle glasses I used to. And of course using power tools require a powering up mode to be careful. 

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I think the Dremel (and other rotary tools) get a bad rap. In "skilled" hands they can be great.

Like DDD said, less is more. Do less rather than be sorry. Use a finer grit and go slow... you'll save yourself aggravation and probably $$.

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I’ve used mine with the flexible extension to cut the curve on the back of my krag-bowie bayonet that I built from a very rough 1917 bolo. I used the bow tie cut off wheels as opposed to grinding off all that steel. The flexible extension gives you a lot more control over the tool. I tend to use dremel tool bits in my mill and drill press more often though.

8B6A28AE-76DE-4DE9-B24E-D7A9585C8A75.jpeg

Edited by Baltimore Ed
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What do you use a Dremel for? 

What CAN'T you use one for?

 

:blink:

BFRbarrel.jpg

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finger.jpg

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I use it on the carrier of my 1873.  Apply some Flitz by hand, rubbing it in, then the Dremel with buffing wheel on low speed.  Gets the carrier clean and shiny.

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675905d1579394658-very-rough-1901-saa-9b

 

675903d1579394658-very-rough-1901-saa-8c

 

Colt made in 1901

Edited by Warden Callaway

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Hi all and yes I am a Dentist and used a Dremel on my rifle and shotgun. In my hands I can do a lot. I have polishing wheels not available to most. I polished all the internals with it. That was five years ago and working just fine. Yes in the wrong hands it can cause a lot of damage but total condemnation is not in order. I also make grips for Ruger New Vaquaros and am currently making templates for Uberti pistols.

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