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Doc Coles SASS 1188

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Doc Coles SASS 1188 last won the day on August 30 2018

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About Doc Coles SASS 1188

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    Member
  • Birthday 02/13/1964

Previous Fields

  • SASS #
    1188
  • SASS Affiliated Club
    River City Regulators (#7), Alaska 49rs, NRA Life Member

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
  • Interests
    Historical Archaeology,

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  1. I would have bought more Colt single actions when they were $500-600, I would have kept the original artillery model I traded away, I would have kept the original Smith and Wessons and Merwin and Hulberts that I sold off to pay for graduate school. I would have also bought more second generation BP Colts when they were cheap. I guess the take home message is you should buy and keep the best guns you can afford. They are a joy to own and shoot and if you buy the best, they rarely go down in value.
  2. Then the sport dies. But, it also dies if we don’t have enough shooters. To be clear, I am not saying that people shouldn’t help. I am saying that not everyone has the bandwidth to do much more than shoot. If they are criticized for that, we are likely to loose them. Maybe some would say good riddance, but there would be a cost.
  3. Since the mid 80s I have started three SASS clubs and spent a lot of time organizing matches and doing other club functions. But, my professional and family life have changed (for the better and busier) and I am now lucky if I can make it to a match. In addition, I broke a hip some years back, which makes it hard for me to carry steel. I always help out in spotting, picking and tearing down when I go to a match. I wish I could do more, but right now I can’t. I think this is true of a lot of folks, especially folks who still work and have kids at home. While I think it’s important f
  4. Interesting article, but honestly the adds in the magazine are more fun. Makes you wish you could buy a few SAAs, 1911s, and 1917 Colts, some 1903 Springfield’s and Garands, and mannlicher pistol or two. I would probably pick up a Chauchat as well.
  5. Many years ago, when sass was young, I shot an Ithaca double that was starting to wear a bit. If you opened it too hard, the cocking levers would slip past the surface that operated them, which locked the gun open. In the middle of an all shotgun stage (12-16 targets) where you went down stage, the gun locked open. While running to the next shooting position, I removed the forearm and barrel, reassembled the gun and kept going. The best part is that I won the stage! That was back when I was young and not many people ran on stages. One of my favorite sass memories.
  6. That looks like a takeoff 3rd generation. It’s got some marks on it. $100-150 in my book, but look around and see what they are selling for on EBay/Gunbroker etc.
  7. You absolutely need to know if it is a 2nd or 3rd generation to know it’s value. Check the threads per inch (TPI). The 1st and 2nd gen barrels are 20 tpi, the 3rd gen barrels are 24tpi. You also need to know the condition of the bore, finish, and the rest. Third generation barrels are commonly available and worth the retail price. Second generation barrels are harder to find and are worth what someone will pay. 45s are the most desirable, with 4.75, 7.5, and 5.5 being popular in that order. You see more 5.5 inch barrels than anything else. If it is a 1st gen, then it is a different ballga
  8. It can also lead to a sudden and dramatic loss of accuracy. Many years ago (I think 1995), I shot a railroad flat match using BP and smokeless lube. After about 6 stages, my rifle fouled so badly that it threw bullets all over the place. I couldn’t hit a rifle target at SASS ranges. I cleaned the gun before the next stage and it tightened right up. I went on to win the BP class but never used smokeless lube and BP again.
  9. I shoot Cimarron 7.5 inch 72 open tops in .45 schofield. Had them for 20+ years, if memory serves. I really like the 1860 grips and they point really well. I also love my Colt SAAs, but the 72s are special.
  10. Which the Chaparral is very likely to need…
  11. The archaeology showed that some of these locations were likely spurious. The scholarly works on the archaeology have the best information. They compare the physical record with the historical record and discuss why and how the historical accounts changed over time. The evidence shows that some of the early Indian accounts of the battle were quite accurate, and the traditional “last stand” account is bunk. Very interesting reading.
  12. I don’t know what gun you would be loading for, but if it is an original Springfield or Rolling Block, be aware that the bore diameter on these old 50-70s can be quite large. Shooting the modern, smaller diameter bullets in them can lead to heavy leading of the bore.
  13. No offense to Tippmann, they look pretty nice. However, I find it hard to pay more for a reproduction than a good original. Rolling blocks are much cheaper than other period single shots and are pretty widely available. For example, I bought my 1872, 50-70 New York rolling block with a really nice bore for about half the msrp listed on the tippmann website. The European rolling blocks are a good deal as well. You do have to deal with the old calibers, which can be a challenge, but not impossible.
  14. Anchorage to Coldfoot is a really long day. I have done it, but I was getting paid. Also, most rental companies don’t allow you to drive the dalton highway. There might be a tour bus you could take.
  15. Good to hear people are still coming up. Be sure to check on the Covid requirements (whatever they are by the time you come). Lots of options depending on what you like. Anchorage is a city so you don’t get the full Alaska experience. There are some great trails in and around anchorage, but be prepared. The Anchorage museum is good, if that’s your bent. Lots of good restaurants (we have less chains than most places). There is not that much going on in Palmer, though you can go to the Muskox farm. If you want to see the country, you could drive up to D
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