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  1. For those that did not follow the Kansas State - Classic Cowboy Showdown thread. I am now retired after 20 years at Texas Woman's University, Facilities Management and Construction in Denton Texas. Prior to that for 25 years I worked for 3 different Architects in Fort Worth Texas. So that is 45 years in the industry, 25 working with Owners and Contractors producing construction documents and 20 years as the owner working with Architects and Contractors marking up construction documents. Now I can travel and play Cowboy without having to deal with limited vacation time. Started off my retirement May 1st by traveling to Kansas to shoot the State Championship and Classic Cowboy Showdown. Later this month I will shoot the Mississippi State Championship then the Wisconsin State Championship. Mississippi will be my 22nd and Wisconsin my 23rd different state to shoot Cowboy Action. Maybe I will get to meet you down the road if we have not already met during my 22 years of shooting Cowboy Action.
    24 points
  2. I yam alive and relatively well..physically. Just returned from NM on Monday. Attended the Historical Society Conference and the Wild West Dance in Albuquerque. Unbeknownst to me they had a costume contest and I won Best Lawman outfit. Donna was deessed as Olive Oatman, chin tattoo and all. She should have won best historical lady. I even made a dance card for her. Uneducated judges I reckon. She did let me wear her bonnet for awhile. Back in Cahone now enjoying the fine spring weather.
    24 points
  3. A number of you have read this story before. We had a local shooter "Know Justice" that suffered from brain cancer - he endured many drawn out treatments; chemo and multiple surgeries. He never lost his love for and desire to participate in Cowboy Action. But as anyone who has gone through these treatments or watched a loved one do so - they are devastating upon the body and stamina. Know Justice was able to shoot safely; but had issues with remembering sequences. I spent the last couple years of his life being his "designated" timer - I would direct every shot to assist him thru the stage. As he weakened - he began having trouble with movement and carrying firearms; we would carry his firearms to their staging positions and (I was younger and stronger then) I would hold the timer right handed and wrap his suspenders up in my left so if he stumbled I could hold him up. He got weaker and weaker and even after we accepted that we had lost the battle - he wanted to keep shooting. When he reached the point that he could no longer hold his 97 up one handed as to pull shells from his belt; I would clip the timer to my own suspenders, hold him up with my left hand and load his shotgun from my belt so all he had to do was keep both hands on the shotgun and pump the action. I once had a shooter "tell" me that we should be calling penalties on these actions and that we should make him stop shooting. I informed this shooter that as long as he wanted to do so and I felt he could do so safely; even if that required me carrying him in my arms or on my back - he would continue shooting... And they were more than welcome to leave if they disagreed. When Know Justice passed - his self written eulogy was read. The only people he mentioned by name were myself and Buffalo Sam; not his children, not his neighbors, nor anyone else from his nearly 80 years of life. Cheyenne - I DO NOT care what anyone else says. You allow this shooter to participate in whatever capacity they are able; for as long as they are able. Accomodate them in any way necessary to allow them to play - the day will come soon enough that they will no longer be able. I miss Know Justice and treasure every single day that I had with him. I wish I had one more.
    23 points
  4. I bought this pair of Old Armies from a pard who’s trimming down his cap gun supply. He had Snake Oil George shorten the barrels to 3 1/4” and install solid brass sights. The hammers were lowered when he got them and doesn’t know who did them but they did a nice job. I bought Kirst Konversion cylinders in .45 Colt and have been using Cowboy .45 Special in them and really like them. I wanted to install blued Belt Mountain quick change base pin kits but they’re going out of business due to retirement and only had stainless kits left and I think they look real good on them. The previous owner also had some very nice engraving done and installed some beautiful grips. All in all I think they’re a pretty classy set of Old Armies and will be my new main match pistols.
    23 points
  5. Just add "From either end" Black Powder shooters and Lefties appreciate the option of going right-to-left or left-to-right. It makes no real difference to right-handed smokeless shooters, but it might make a huge difference to BP guys and Lefties. --Dawg
    23 points
  6. When I got out of the Navy in 73, I started going to church with a feller that liked to shoot ..... .22 pistols in particular. EDIT: I didn't go to church 'WITH' that feller. His family and my family were going to the same church. He introduced me to the S&W model 41. I couldn't believe its refined feel and accuracy. Soooooo, I bought me one back around 74. Cost was $146 for a new one. Since then, I have owned, sold and/or traded everyone I've owned, which was about 10 of them. Then about 2 years ago, a fellow Cowboy Shooter passed away and his son started selling off some of his guns..... cowboy guns and other guns. One of them was a S&W model 41. I bought it. About 15 minutes after I got it, the son produced a picture of the pistol along with the history of it. His father had bought the pistol back in the 80's FROM THE VERY GUY had introduced me to that model pistol. And that particular pistol was the one I had originally fired back in 74. It was still in top shape with all the blue and SUPER crisp trigger. Now get this.......... The serial number is my birth day. Is that strange, or what? ..........Widder
    22 points
  7. I ate breakfast at one of my favorite spots this morning. A few minutes after I got served a young Oriental man and two really lovely ladies sat down across from me, one next to him the other across the table. They were having fun and being friendly with every one who passed by. I finished my meal and as I got up I commented that "you know, life is unfair". I told the young man "It doesn't seem right that you have two and I don't have any." He grinned and put his arm around the girl beside him and told me "Well this one is mine but you can have the other one. She's my sister." "His" elbowed him in the ribs but the "sister" stood up beside me and said "I'll go with you sir, if you promise to make an honest woman (antique phrase) of me and don't ever have to admit that he is my brother." "His pushed him out of the way and stood on my other side. "I don't like the way he claimed me as 'mine' so I'll go with you, too." The people in the cafe were getting in on it by now, laughing and having a good time making suggestions and cheering me on. This dude looked like he'd peed on an electric fence and started apologizing, but the crowd wouldn't let it go. They were all over him. Finally "His" said that she had a lot invested in him because they were married and the kids would need a daddy, so she'd back out of the mix. "Sister" was known by a lady in the crowd who suggested that she had better check with her mother because this boy needed looking after and Mom couldn't spare any more time, what with grandkids coming. I stepped back and thanked the ladies for accepting my offer (I didn't remind them that I hadn't made any offer) and that at my age it was the best acceptance of any offer I'd had in years. We were all cheered and as I left I paid for their breakfasts. If I were sixty years younger and single......... HUH, my soon to be wife would have killed me in front of all those witnesses!!! Life isn't perfect, but Mother Nature showed us that she has a sense of humor and it made my day. Sometimes life is just plain fun!
    19 points
  8. This is a stage problem. Everything else is just whining.
    18 points
  9. shooter's handbook, page 21 "5-SECOND PENALTIES Misses are 5-Second penalties. Revolver, rifle, and shotgun targets must be engaged with the appropriate type of firearm. A MISS is defined as the failure to hit the appropriate target type using the appropriate type of firearm and includes: - Each missed target. - Each unfired round. ... Double Jeopardy applies- a miss cannot cause a procedural." A miss for the unfired round. No "P" --Dawg
    18 points
  10. 9 year old discovered an extremely strange object on the beach. When her parents found out what it was, they were at a loss of words Molly Sampson, a nine-year-old 4th grader from Prince Frederick, Maryland, discovered the find of a lifetime while spending time at the Calvert Beach on Christmas morning. This paleontologist in the making enjoys combing Maryland’s beaches for shark teeth because as she says, “They’re just cool because they’re really old.” Sweet Molly inherited her fascination with fossils from her dad. “She loves treasure hunting,” Molly’s mom, Alicia Sampson, said of her daughter. Over the years, Molly has collected more than 400 fossilized shark teeth, but her recent find is so fascinating that the story of it vent viral in a matter of days. Namely, this fossil hunter found an enormous, 5-inch-long, chomper belonging to a megalodon, the largest shark to ever swim Earth’s oceans. The family took the enormous tooth to Stephen Godfrey, a curator of paleontogloy at Calvert Marine Museum in Solomons, who confirmed that Molly’s once-in-a-lifetime find belonged to a megalodon. “Dr. Godfrey explained to Molly that the shark would’ve been the size of a Greyhound bus,” Alicia said. “Molly didn’t know what that was so she looked it up and could not believe it.” Speaking of the moment she spotted the tooth, Molly told NPR, “I went closer, and in my head, I was like, ‘Oh, my, that is the biggest tooth I’ve ever seen!'” She then added: “I reached in and grabbed it, and dad said I was shrieking.” According to Godfrey, the tooth Molly found came from the upper left jaw of a megalodon that was probably 45 to 50 feet long and lived about 15 million years ago. “It basically evolved those kinds of teeth so that it could cut out pieces, just like great white sharks do,” Godfrey says. “They sort of chomp the carcass of their prey” rather than swallowing it whole. The name “Megalodon” includes two Greek words that translate to “giant tooth,” and the one Molly found measures the size of her hand. As Molly’s story spread around, her family decided to use it as a way to remind young children like their daughter of the importance of spending more time out in the nature. “We really want to reach other kids and get them excited about like being outside,” Alicia said.
    17 points
  11. I have been shooting open tops for the last few years (I have 6, pairs in 3 calibers) so I have forsaken Top breaks. Well, I work part time in a local gun shop, and guess what came in? A Uberti No. 3, 1st Model "American" 5" top break in .44 Spcl/Russian! It had been back ordered several years ago, apparently, but there is no longer any record of who ordered it, nor was there a deposit paid. Boss knew I like cowboy guns, and offered it to me, to work off with shifts! I said "hell yes!". I liked it so much, I contacted Cimarron and arranged to get an 8" in the same caliber. I ow have a pair. They go great with my 1860 Henry and hammered double. I used them at a local match last week end and loved them. I am loading a 246 grain, conical round nose lead .44 Russian bullets over 5.3 grains of Unique in a Starline .44 Russian case. Pretty much dead on at 7 yards.
    17 points
  12. First and foremost, you meet up with @Yul Lose in a saloon in Tombstone. You tell him you want something really special and give him some wood preferences. Then you leave the artist to let him perform his magic. And you get a one of a kind work of art that keeps a cowgirl smiling all day!
    16 points
  13. May 4, 2024, RUFF JUSTICE was presented with his REGULATOR badge. It came as a complete surprise to him. The cowboys and cowgirls of Ruff's Regulators of Cornwall, the Wild Turkey Posse of Grenville and the Square Circle Wranglers of Ottawa, have appreciated his efforts as a prop builder, painter, host and all around promoter of the Cowboy Way in the area.
    16 points
  14. My wife started this some long time ago with intent to have it finished by my birthday. It's a little late but I am sitting here just plainly devouring it with my eyes! She ordered a plastic model and spent an unholy amount of time and effort (and holding her breath!) to detail this to her satisfaction!
    16 points
  15. While traversing western Colorado I stopped in Glenwood Springs to pay tribute. Like many old cemeteries, records don’t show exactly where he is buried, but it was still a nice visit.
    15 points
  16. Thanks for the thoughts and prayers. Surgeon just let us know that everything went smoothly. He will be in ICU until tomorrow. Should be awake and able to talk tomorrow afternoon.
    15 points
  17. I may have mentioned two of my great grandfathers who were Confederate soldiers. One was scour for General Sterling Price and the other signed up and was on his way with a few others to get uniforms weapons, and cetera when a Yankee patrol captured them and he spent the rest of the war in a POW camp in Michigan. Well, I recently was given some of Mom's papers that my sister had ever since Mom passed. Sis didn't know, nor did she much care, what they were. Four eight and a half by fourteen photo copies of pay records for Private Robert C. Owens (My grandmothers uncle and brother to the one who was a scout) of Captain Landis' Company, of Light Artillery, CSA. There are four pay records per page and start on December 8, 1862. There are some gaps because the next one, dated July (can't read the day) 1862. Skip ahead and he is on the Roll of Prisoners of War, captured at Vicksburg on July 4, 1863 and now living at Camp Morton, Indiana. He was released January3, 1865 after refusing for the entire time he was a prisoner to accept parole and finally taking the oath of allegiance to the Union at Camp Morton, Illinois. He was released at Gratiot Street Prison, Saint Louis, Missouri. He was described as dark complexion with brown hair and black eyes, standing 5'7 3/4" tall. One more brick in the wall.
    15 points
  18. Visiting the Assisted Living Facility where one of Ann's client resides, has a wall dedicated to those residents who have served our Country. The beauty of this particular display is that a past picture of them is displayed beside their current self.
    14 points
  19. On July 21st, 1979 Jay Silverheels, became the first Indigenous Native to have a star commemorated on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Harold Jay Smith, was a full-blooded Mohawk, born May 26th,1912 on the Six Nations Indian Reservation in Ontario, Canada. He excelled in athletics, most notably in lacrosse. In 1931 he was among the first players chosen to play for the Toronto Tecumsehs, where he earned the nickname "Silverheels". And in 1997 he was inducted into the Canadian Lacrosse Hall of Fame as a veteran player. In 1938, he placed second in the middleweight class of the Golden Gloves tournament. This led to his working in motion pictures as an extra and stuntman in 1937. Billed variously as Harold Smith and Harry Smith, before taking the name Jay Silverheels. He appeared in low-budget features, mostly Westerns, and serials before landing his much loved and iconic role as Tonto on national tv from 1949 until 1957 along with two movies. In the early 1960s, he was a founding member of the Indian Actors Workshop, in Echo Park, Los Angeles. Where Native actors refine their skills. Today the workshop is still a well established institution. Silverheels died on March 5, 1980, from stroke, at age 67, in Calabasas, California. He was cremated at Chapel of the Pines Crematory, and his ashes were returned to the Six Nations Reserve in Ontario
    14 points
  20. Mine have zippers or buttons, but I am skilled in the rest of of your list.
    14 points
  21. Good dinner. Fairly nice sunset.
    14 points
  22. Subject: Sheep, Wolves & Sheepdogs Jill Edwards, a junior math major at the University of Washington. In brief, Edwards, a member of the UW student senate, opposed a memorial to UW grad "Pappy" Boyington. Boyington was a U.S. Marine aviator who earned the Medal of Honor in World War II. Edwards said that she didn't think it was appropriate to honor a person who killed other people. She also said that a member of the Marine Corps was NOT an example of the sort of person the University of Washington wanted to produce. Gen. Dula's letter to the University of Washington student senate leader. To: Edwards, Jill (student, UW) Subject: Sheep, Wolves and Sheepdogs Miss Edwards, I read of your 'student activity' regarding the proposed memorial to Col Greg Boyington, USMC and a Medal of Honor winner. I suspect you will receive a bellyful of angry e-mails from conservative folks like me. You may be too young to appreciate fully the sacrifices of generations of servicemen and servicewomen on whose shoulders you and your fellow students stand. I forgive you for the untutored ways of youth and your naiveté. It may be that you are, simply, a sheep. There's no dishonor in being a sheep - - as long as you know and accept what you are. Please take a couple of minutes to read the following. And be grateful for the thousands - - millions - - of American sheepdogs who permit you the freedom to express even bad ideas. Brett Dula Sheepdog, retired ---------------------------------------------------------- ON SHEEP, WOLVES, AND SHEEPDOGS By LTC(RET) Dave Grossman, RANGER, Ph.D., author of "On Killing." Honor never grows old, and honor rejoices the heart of age. It does so because honor is, finally, about defending those noble and worthy things that deserve defending, even if it comes at a high cost. In our time, that may mean social disapproval, public scorn, hardship, persecution, or as always, even death itself. "Most of the people in our society are sheep. They are kind, gentle, productive creatures who can only hurt one another by accident." This is true. Remember, the murder rate is six per 100,000 per year, and the aggravated assault rate is four per 1,000 per year. What this means is that the vast majority of Americans are not inclined to hurt one another. Some estimates say that two million Americans are victims of violent crimes every year, a tragic, staggering number, perhaps an all-time record rate of violent crime. But there are almost 300 million Americans, which means that the odds of being a victim of violent crime is considerably less than one in a hundred on any given year. Furthermore, since many violent crimes are committed by repeat offenders, the actual number of violent citizens is considerably less than two million. Thus there is a paradox, and we must grasp both ends of the situation: We may well be in the most violent times in history, but violence is still remarkably rare. This is because most citizens are kind, decent people who are not capable of hurting each other, except by accident or under extreme provocation. They are sheep. I mean nothing negative by calling them sheep. To me, it is like the pretty, blue robin's egg. Inside it is soft and gooey but someday it will grow into something wonderful. But the egg cannot survive without its hard blue shell. Police officers, soldiers, and other warriors are like that shell. And, someday the civilization they protect will grow into something wonderful. For now, though, they need warriors to protect them from the predators. "Then there are the wolves,", "and the wolves feed on the sheep without mercy." Do you believe there are wolves out there who will feed on the flock without mercy? You better believe it. There are evil men in this world and they are capable of evil deeds. The moment you forget that or pretend it is not so, you become a sheep. There is no safety in denial. "Then there are sheepdogs," he went on, "and I'm a sheepdog. I live to protect the flock and confront the wolf." If you have no capacity for violence then you are a healthy productive citizen, a sheep. If you have a capacity for violence and no empathy for your fellow citizens, then you have defined an aggressive sociopath, a wolf. But what if you have a capacity for violence, and a deep love for your fellow citizens? What do you have then? A sheepdog, a warrior, someone who is walking the hero's path. Someone who can walk into the heart of darkness, into the universal human phobia, and walk out unscathed Let me expand on this old soldier's excellent model of the sheep, wolves, and sheepdogs. We know that the sheep live in denial. That is what makes them sheep. They do not want to believe that there is evil in the world. They can accept the fact that fires can happen, which is why they want fire extinguishers, fire sprinklers, fire alarms and fire exits throughout their kids' schools. But many of them are outraged at the idea of putting an armed police officer in their kid's school. Our children are thousands of times more likely to be killed or seriously injured by school violence than fire, but the sheep's only response to the possibility of violence is denial. The idea of someone coming to kill or harm their child is just too hard, and so they chose the path of denial. The sheep generally do not like the sheepdog. He looks a lot like the wolf. He has fangs and the capacity for violence. The difference, though, is that the sheepdog must not, can not and will not ever harm the sheep. Any sheep dog who intentionally harms the lowliest little lamb will be punished and removed. The world cannot work any other way, at least not in a representative democracy or a republic such as ours. Still, the sheepdog disturbs the sheep. He is a constant reminder that there are wolves in the land. They would prefer that he didn't tell them where to go, or give them traffic tickets, or stand at the ready in our airports, in camouflage fatigues, holding an M-16. The sheep would much rather have the sheepdog cash in his fangs, spray paint himself white, and go, "Baa."; Until the wolf shows up. Then the entire flock tries desperately to hide behind one lonely sheepdog. The students, the victims, at Columbine High School were big, tough high school students, and under ordinary circumstances they would not have had the time of day for a police officer. They were not bad kids; they just had nothing to say to a cop. When the school was under attack, however, and SWAT teams were clearing the rooms and hallways, the officers had to physically peel those clinging, sobbing kids off of them. This is how the little lambs feel about their sheepdog when the wolf is at the door. Look at what happened after September 11, 2001 when the wolf pounded hard on the door. Remember how America, more than ever before, felt differently about their law enforcement officers and military personnel? Remember how many times you heard the word hero? Understand that there is nothing morally superior about being a sheepdog; it is just what you choose to be. Also understand that a sheepdog is a funny critter: He is always sniffing around out on the perimeter, checking the breeze, barking at things that go bump in the night, and yearning for a righteous battle. That is, the young sheepdogs yearn for a righteous battle. The old sheepdogs are a little older and wiser, but they move to the sound of the guns when needed, right along with the young ones. Here is how the sheep and the sheepdog think differently. The sheep pretend the wolf will never come, but the sheepdog lives for that day. After the attacks on September 11, 2001, most of the sheep, that is, most citizens in America said, "Thank God I wasn't on one of those planes." The sheepdogs, the warriors, said, "Dear God, I wish I could have been on one of those planes. Maybe I could have made a difference." When you are truly transformed into a warrior and have truly invested yourself into warrior-hood, you want to be there. You want to be able to make a difference. There is nothing morally superior about the sheepdog, the warrior, but he does have one real advantage. Only one. And that is that he is able to survive and thrive in an environment that destroys 98 percent of the population. There was research conducted a few years ago with individuals convicted of violent crimes. These cons were in prison for serious, predatory crimes of violence: assaults, murders and killing law enforcement officers. The vast majority said that they specifically targeted victims by body language: Slumped walk, passive behavior and lack of awareness. They chose their victims like big cats do in Africa, when they select one out of the herd that is least able to protect itself. Some people may be destined to be sheep and others might be genetically primed to be wolves or sheepdogs. But I believe that most people can choose which one they want to be, and I'm proud to say that more and more Americans are choosing to become sheepdogs. Seven months after the attack on September 11, 2001, Todd Beamer was honored in his hometown of Cranbury, New Jersey. Todd, as you recall, was the man on Flight 93 over Pennsylvania who called on his cell phone to alert an operator from United Airlines about the hijacking. When he learned of the other three passenger planes that had been used as weapons, Todd dropped his phone and uttered the words, "Let's roll," which authorities believe was a signal to the other passengers to confront the terrorist hijackers. In one hour, a transformation occurred among the passengers - athletes, business people and parents. -- from sheep to sheepdogs and together they fought the wolves, ultimately saving an unknown number of lives on the ground. There is no safety for honest men except by believing all possible evil of evil men. - Edmund Burke Here is the point I like to emphasize, especially to the thousands of police officers and soldiers I speak to each year. In nature the sheep, real sheep, are born as sheep. Sheepdogs are born that way, and so are wolves. They didn't have a choice. But you are not a critter. As a human being, you can be whatever you want to be. It is a conscious, moral decision. If you want to be a sheep, then you can be a sheep and that is okay, but you must understand the price you pay. When the wolf comes, you and your loved ones are going to die if there is not a sheepdog there to protect you. If you want to be a wolf, you can be one, but the sheepdogs are going to hunt you down and you will never have rest, safety, trust or love. But if you want to be a sheepdog and walk the warrior's path, then you must make a conscious and moral decision every day to dedicate, equip and prepare yourself to thrive in that toxic, corrosive moment when the wolf comes knocking at the door. For example, many officers carry their weapons in church. They are well concealed in ankle holsters, shoulder holsters or inside-the-belt holsters tucked into the small of their backs. Anytime you go to some form of religious service, there is a very good chance that a police officer in your congregation is carrying. You will never know if there is such an individual in your place of worship, until the wolf appears to massacre you and your loved ones. In Texas, one officer asked his friend if he carried his weapon in church. The other cop replied, "I will never be caught without my gun in church." I asked why he felt so strongly about this, and he told me about a cop he knew who was at a church massacre in Ft. Worth, Texas in 1999. In that incident, a mentally deranged individual came into the church and opened fire, gunning down fourteen people. He said that officer believed he could have saved every life that day if he had been carrying his gun. His own son was shot, and all he could do was throw himself on the boy's body and wait to die. That cop looked me in the eye and said, "Do you have any idea how hard it would be to live with yourself after that?" Some individuals would be horrified if they knew this police officer was carrying a weapon in church. They might call him paranoid and would probably scorn him. Yet these same individuals would be enraged and would call for "heads to roll" if they found out that the airbags in their cars were defective, or that the fire extinguisher and fire sprinklers in their kids' school did not work. They can accept the fact that fires and traffic accidents can happen and that there must be safeguards against them. Their only response to the wolf, though, is denial, and all too often their response to the sheepdog is scorn and disdain. But the sheepdog quietly asks himself, "Do you have any idea how hard it would be to live with yourself if your loved ones were attacked and killed, and you had to stand there helplessly because you were unprepared for that day?" It is denial that turns people into sheep. Sheep are psychologically destroyed by combat because their only defense is denial, which is counterproductive and destructive, resulting in fear, helplessness and horror when the wolf shows up. Denial kills you twice. It kills you once, at your moment of truth when you are not physically prepared: you didn't bring your gun, you didn't train. Your only defense was wishful thinking. Hope is not a strategy. Denial kills you a second time because even if you do physically survive, you are psychologically shattered by your fear, helplessness and horror at your moment of truth. Gavin de Becker puts it like this: "...denial can be seductive, but it has an insidious side effect. For all the peace of mind deniers think they get by saying it isn't so, the fall they take when faced with new violence is all the more unsettling." Denial is a save-now-pay-later scheme, a contract written entirely in small print, for in the long run, the denying person knows the truth on some level. And so the warrior must strive to confront denial in all aspects of his life, and prepare himself for the day when evil comes. If you are warrior who is legally authorized to carry a weapon and you step outside without that weapon, then you become a sheep, pretending that the bad man will not come today. No one can be "on" 24/7, for a lifetime. Everyone needs down time. But if you are authorized to carry a weapon, and you walk outside without it, just take a deep breath, and say this to yourself..."Baa." This business of being a sheep or a sheep dog is not a yes-no dichotomy. It is not an all-or-nothing, either-or choice. It is a matter of degrees, a continuum. On one end is an abject, head-in-the-sand-sheep and on the other end is the ultimate warrior. Few people exist completely on one end or the other. Most of us live somewhere in between. Since 9-11 almost everyone in America took a step up that continuum, away from denial. The sheep took a few steps toward accepting and appreciating their warriors, and the warriors started taking their job more seriously. The degree to which you move up that continuum, away from sheep-hood and denial, is the degree to which you and your loved ones will survive, physically and psychologically at your moment of truth. "If It Weren't For The United States Military", "There Would Be NO United States of America" There is a problem with the story. There are only sheep, wolves and sheepdogs. It's missing people like us. Like most here, I am a bear. I eat berries and vegetation and occasionally carrion and can kill to sustain myself but don't have to. The wolves don't like me very much either and don't mess with me because they can tell the difference between me and the sheep. The sheep like me because they think I'm a sheep too. But they are wrong. The sheepdogs aren't quite sure about the bears - they mostly like the bears but some sheepdogs don't like the bears because they think only the sheepdogs should have fangs. My fangs are actually much more potent and I am more skilled with their use than most sheepdogs - not all, but most. Bears are fine without the sheepdogs and resent being grouped with the sheep when that happens... The story is missing the bears. ******************************************* After reading this I guess I would say I am also a bear. Interesting read. TM
    13 points
  23. In 1892 at Stanford University, an 18-year-old student was struggling to pay his fees. He was an orphan, and not knowing where to turn for money, he came up with a bright idea. He and a friend decided to host a musical concert on campus to raise money for their education. They reached out to the great pianist Ignacy J. Paderewski. His manager demanded a guaranteed fee of $2000 for the piano recital. A deal was struck, and the boys began to work to make the concert a success. The big day has arrived. But unfortunately, they had not managed to sell enough tickets. The total collection was only $1600. Disappointed, they went to Paderewski and explained their plight. They gave him the entire $1600, plus a check for the balance $400. They promised to honor the check at the soonest possible. “No,” said Paderewski. “This is not acceptable.” He tore up the check, returned the $1600 and told the two boys: “Here’s the $1600. Please deduct whatever expenses you have incurred. Keep the money you need for your fees. And just give me whatever is left”. The boys were surprised and thanked him profusely. It was a small act of kindness. But it clearly marked out Paderewski as a great human being. Why should he help two people he didn't even know? We all come across situations like these in our lives. And most of us only think “If I help them, what will happen to me?” The truly great people think, “If I don’t help them, what will happen to them?” They don’t do it expecting something in return. They do it because they feel it’s the right thing to do. Paderewski later went on to become the Prime Minister of Poland. He was a great leader, but unfortunately when the World War began, Poland was ravaged. There were more than 1.5 million people starving in his country, and no money to feed them. Paderewski didn't know where to turn for help. He reached out to the US Food and Relief Administration for help. He heard there was a man called Herbert Hoover — who later went on to become the US President. Hoover agreed to help and quickly shipped tons of food grains to feed the starving Polish people. The calamity was averted. Paderewski was relieved. He decided to go across to meet Hoover and personally thank him. When Paderewski began to thank Hoover for his noble gesture, Hoover quickly interjected and said, “You shouldn’t be thanking me Mr. Prime Minister. You may not remember this, but several years ago, you helped two young students go through college. I was one of them.”
    13 points
  24. You've heard of Rosey the Riveter? Meet Stella the Sten Gunner.
    13 points
  25. I got it off. Soaking in Kroil didn’t work. It still wouldn’t budge. I used a cut off wheel to take it down near to the barrel then used a hacksaw to slowly remove metal without cutting into the barrel. When it was close, I was able to pinch it off with a pair of plier. New sight was installed and the barrel is safe. Thanks everyone.
    13 points
  26. These events are not "pro-Palestinian." They are media events staged by supporters of Muslim Einsatzgruppen dedicated to carrying out the National Socialist Final Solution. The Hamas death squads , as usual, broke the existing cease fire, attacked Israel, retreated behind their human shields in Gaza, killing many citizens themselves for propaganda photos as well as knowing that IDF retaliation would inflict additional civilian casualties among the women and infants that Hamas loves to hide behind, and then scream for a cease fire because big bad Israel is picking on them for no reason. All those mohammedean Einsatzgruppen want is a chance to rearm.
    13 points
  27. Like CC stated, its up to the TO to make a final call on the 'P'. But, a spotter can let the TO know that he/she saw the 'P' and tell the TO what exactly caused the 'P'. Its still up to the TO of make the 'P' official. And also as CC stated, the ...."I think" should never precede a penalty call. ..........Widder
    13 points
  28. Launched in 1977, it’s now 15 billion miles from earth. It took 5 months to fix a glitch in its computers. Think about that, the computers aboard are over 47 years old, and the engineers communicate with it using 1977 computers and their ancient language from earth. A stunning achievement! https://abcnews.go.com/amp/Technology/nasa-voyager-1-spacecraft-sending-readable-data-back-earth/story?id=109572983
    13 points
  29. Shooter should have declared the malfunction and safely grounded the revolver. TO should have waited until the end of the stage to verify the position of the unfired round in the cylinder (SDQ if under the hammer). If the TO had simply advised the shooter to safely stage the revolver instead of reholstering it, THAT would have been considered "proper coaching" to avoid the possibilty of a SDQ = No RESHOOT. Shooter should have appealed the miscall up the chain of command & received a RESHOOT for RO interference: SHB p.20
    13 points
  30. Wouldn't that be "ARRR!" rated? (Come on, you know SOMEBODY had to do it).
    13 points
  31. Cinema symphony · Katharine Ross and Sam Elliott holding hands between takes in filming The Shadow Riders, 1982. The two actors have been married since 1984. "My wife, Katharine Ross, and I both worked on Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969), but I didn’t dare try to talk to her then," the actor later revealed. "She was the leading lady. I was a shadow on the wall, a glorified extra in a bar scene." Their paths would cross again in 1978, and the rest as they say is history. "We have a common sensibility, but we also work at being together. You work past the s--t; you don't walk away from it. That's how relationships last." Photo by Tim Conrad.
    12 points
  32. Let him shoot. Then let the club decide as to awarding 'P's and such. Priority ONE: Safety Priority TWO: fun ..........Widder
    12 points
  33. Some years back, we had a shooter at one of our clubs, who came as often as able. He also had a real memory problem. He was on the far side of 75 or 80. We had a simple solution. We simply didn't count "Ps" at all. Just misses. Worked well for all. He has since passed and will be missed. Play the Game as long as you can.
    12 points
  34. I would say that as long as he can shoot the guns safely, the scoring is not important.
    12 points
  35. Who remembers Zzyzx? We met many years ago when he would drive from California to Pennsylvania annually to visit his son. He searched out the nearest cowboy club, which fortunately was ours, and joined us during his stay. I remember asking him how long he would be staying and his reply was something like "It didn't take me a week to get here to turn around and go home in only a week or two." We were pretty much guaranteed to having him with us for two monthly matches each summer. He was likely in his 80s then and shot full-bore black powder and, claimed that he added a grain each year in honor of another birthday. Needless to say, we could easily see, hear, and smell whatever bay he was shooting in. I just loved him! His son reached out to me last night to let us know that Zzyzx had passed earlier this year at nearly 96 years old. He made sure to tell me that our club had always been one of his favorites. As it turns out he has EVERYTHING cowboy that belonged to his father and has asked permission to come to our match/es to sell it. I'll be first in line to get something in remembrance of one of the sweetest, most memorable cowboys I've met in my 24 years of CAS. RIP Zzyzx aka Harry Campbell
    12 points
  36. This photo, taken in 1945, in the Pacific theater, shows Sgt Archie C. Vanskike Sr. (third from left and his three sons, PCF Clarence E. Vanskike, PFC Louis E. Vanskike and PFC Archie R. Vanskike Jr. (they all came from Galveston, Texas). During WWII, when Clarence, Louis and Archie Jr. went off to war, their 43-year-old father decided to go with them. These four American heroes took part in the New Guinea campaign and the Liberation of the Philippines. Against all odds, they all survived the war and all went back to Texas. This amazing father passed away in 1962, Clarence died in 1978, Louis died in 1979, and Archie died 1988. They are now resting in peace, all together, at Evergreen Cemetery in Galveston.
    12 points
  37. But, some of us were running around barefoot!
    12 points
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