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Cliff Hanger #3720LR

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About Cliff Hanger #3720LR

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  • SASS #
    3720LR
  • SASS Affiliated Club
    Cajon Cowboys, RRBar Regulators, Brimstone Pistoleros

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  • Website URL
    http://www.cliffhangershideout.com/
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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Phelan,CA
  • Interests
    keepin busy

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  1. Looking at your photos, I agree your rounds are too short. The 1860 rifle does not have a next cartridge stop. It depends on the lifter ramp to push the next rouond back in to the magazine tube as the lifter comes up. If the rounds are too short, the rim will in time wear a groove in the ramp that will not let the round rim slide forward, jamming hge gun. My cmmercial rounds were loaded to 1.582" to 1.585" in length to lessen the effort hte lifter ramp has to do. Bullet pushed back in to the case. (smokelss) A good roll crimp will dig in to the bullet sides even if the case is not rolled in to the crip groove. Just watch for case colapsing. Wrinkles on the neck near the shoulder. Black Powder does not usually do this because the cases are filled with power and maybe some filler so the bullet compresses the load. This holds the bullet from sliding back in to the case. There is a photo showing the round in the lifter well as a way to measure. You may need more than the 1.58" number but do not exceed 1.60" Leave a little space between the round and the ends of the lefter well. When you find the length your rifle likes, stick with it.
  2. I think the point is not how deep it is but there is water that deep in the city at all.
  3. Where I am, I can carry with no problem but I can not have it in my hand unless threatened. This is called brandishing.
  4. Not just the sheriff. I hold a FFL for ammunition manufacturing. Along with interviews I went to the sheriff's office to let them know who I was and I have everyone who visits contact me first before arriving. There were only 3 officers but maybe more now. This is where it gets interesting. I have no phone service here and e-mail is what I have. I also got visits from the ATF once a year and some time more if they happened to be passing by. Even the state DOJ rep has been here ver the years. I manufactured for about 18 years. Now the fun part. A few years back I got sick and tried to die on everyone. Since then, I have a friend I have to send an e-mail to, between 6 am and 9 am or they call the sheriff out on me. This has happened 3 maybe 4 times. I see the car coming down the road and I meet the officer on the purch with a soda and a Gaterade. We talk a little then contact my emergency caller to let them know it is all okay here. Some times my net service is down. Wind rain and snow all can cause it to go down. Any way, I have been here in the desert for more than 30 years. And it is a good thing to get to know you local law officers. There are times they come by to ask if I know where some one lives because they don't know the roads. Example. The road name I was given by the county when I first move in here, does not expist here. It stops about 1 mile away. And if it every comes through, it would be my alley. I know, I could change the road name but I do not want to pay big bucks it fit someething the county did. I think it's best to make friends with the sheriff officers and let them know I do carry most of the time on my property. They also know I do not have CCW so I do not carry off property. I have even had luch with them a couple of times over the years. Kind of surprises the new guy when they hire one.
  5. My freinds know to let me know they are coming if it will be dark when they arrive. The local sheriffs know I am a FFL ammunition manufacturer and when they need to come here, they park their car so I can see the full side of it. They knock normally and then go back to their car where I can see them. This is about 30 feet away from the door. I open the door but leave the steel screen door shut. Comfirm their name, step back away from the door but still seem from outside and place my gun on the count before going back to the door. Then we talk out on the porch. I happen to be over a 1/2 mile from the paved road. 7 miles from town. (where the sheriff comes from) I carry on my 10 acres, day and night or have it close by so when I stand up, I can take it with me.
  6. Comes a little late, don't you think? The university has already tarnished the day for so many people. And we will not forget what you did.
  7. Yes, call them on the phone. E-mail or this forum messaging is not a priority in the office.
  8. Here is another fun one. Stuff in Space http://stuffin.space/ Right click on any object and get it's information. Left click on object to bring it to center of screen. Left click on Groups in up left corner to get groups of items.
  9. My personal observations. Your loads allow the filler to get below the neck shoulder. On firing the powder is pushing the filler which pushs the brass and the brass fails breaking the neck and spliting the case. The filler you are using is hydroscopic. It attracks mositure then hardens in to a solid. When I was loading commercially for cas, the filler I used was Instant gritts. It did not attract mositure. It did not harden in to a solid. And most of all, when down loading bottle neck cases, DO NOT have your filler go below the top of the neck. Do Not go in to or below the shoulder. If you do, your down loaded rounds will be come high preesure rounds when they try to move the solid filler in to the neck. The case will fail. And again my opinion. Why down load BP or BP substitues? They have a push recoil and not a hit. And do not let your fired brass sit before cleaning it. 2 or 3 days is long enough and in some cases too long. Also, make sure it drys quickly,. Put in the sun or some where that is warm and mositure free.
  10. Before going to the trouble of relining the barrel, I would like to suggest the following. Sort your brass and only load Starline for your rifle. At one time I was a commercial reloader for cas shooters. The rifles and most importantly the .45 caliber rifles have and extractor that does not fit in to the rim groove very well. Starline has the widest groove allowing the extractor to drop farther down in to the rim groove giving it a better hold. With Starline brass, extraction is more reliable. Winchester brass has the narrowest groove and the extractor only drops about 1/2 way in to the groove and will pop out during extraction leaving the case half way in the chamber. You will want to look at your extrator tip to see if it has become rounded off from use with narrow groove brass. Clean it up with a very small file so it drops cleanly in to the extraction groove. There are other makes of brass with larger than Winchester grooves but Starline has the best groove for rifles. Give it a try. It will cost you nothng but some time. Then if this does not fix the problem, you have other options to consider.
  11. Rossi hammers are true hammers. You pull them back to cock and when you pull the trigger the hammers hits the firing pins. Remove the 2 side screws and the locks come out complete. TO remove the second side, remove only the front screw and the lock will come out complete. The back screws go in to a soacer tube. No need to remove both screws. The spacer can stay on one of the locks. Your choice.
  12. Note: New whell weights are NOT lead. Looking at the end. cross section.. Lead weights have a tear drop look. Zinc weight have a trapezoid look.
  13. As much as I hate living in town, I think I might want to live in town. Everything in walking distance. Rent a horse or horse and buggy as needed from the local livery.
  14. Take 2 or 3 big trash bags. They will fit over most gun carts and if you cut the bottom corners out, they make good ponchos. I keep 2 in the bootom of my gun cart, just in case.
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