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Arizona Gunfighter

Which type of bullet, RNFP or TCFP

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I am shooting .357 in my pistols and my rifle. I want to shoot one type of bullet for all my guns and will be shooting a 125 grain  bullet. Which type would be preferable for both the pistols and the rifle, RNFP or TCFP and why?

Edited by Arizona Gunfighter

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I use a Lee 6 cavity mold that makes the 125 RNFP.  Like the shape of the bullet and my guns seem to like it too.   I do crimp between the crimp groove and the lube groove to get the length I like.  Some of my friends use TCFP because they are generally a little longer, so they can crimp in the crimp groove and get the length they like..    Just my .02        GW

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I shoot 125 gr. TC bullets in both rifle and pistol but can't see where it would make much difference between the two.  I would suggest that you try a few of each and decide.  :rolleyes:

Blackfoot

 

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Depends on what feeds best in your rifle. The pistols aren't picky but rifles sure can be.

I use 125 gr TC coated for my daughter's .38s; feeds great in her Marlin.

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Try both and see what YOUR rifle likes.

 

Your pistols will not care and neither do the targets

Edited by Sedalia Dave
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I was told by a top shooter pard of mine to use TC for the rifle. So now I use them for both.

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Some casters sell sample packs of bullets for testing.  Load up a hundred bullets for testing.  If your rifle does not like them they will quickly disappear in your revolvers.

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AG,

 

If you would ask at our weekly breakfast I would have told you that the majority of us that shoot .357 rounds from the rifle are using a 125 grain RNFP bullet. 

 

aka Roby DaVault, Addie Rose, etc. 

 

TB

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Depends on what your rifle likes. My 73's like rnfp. I have a Marlin that doesn't like them. It likes tcfp. Just have to see what your rifle likes or doesn't like.

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For toggle actions rifles, comparing equal bullet weight, the Truncated Cone will put more nose length out in front of the case, making feeding slicker and more reliable.   A long bullet is needed to reduce "second bullet return" effort as the second bullet that comes partially out on the carrier block is returned back into the magazine.  The cone shape of the bullet feeds evenly into the chamber, gradually self centering, while the RNFP has to do all of it's centering in the first 10-20% of the nose entering the chamber.   Lots of fast and champion shooters run the TC.  

 

You can do tests to see if you have any difference.  If you are not a fast shooter already, you may not be able to see any significant difference, so, therefore, it won't make a difference to YOUR game.

 

Reliability is the real goal, because a single misfeed or jam in a match costs SO much more than a 5% difference in action cycling time.

 

Good luck, GJ

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I have always found Garrison Joe's advice and answers to be right on the money. I shoot the truncated cone bullet with an OAL of 1.52 inches

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I use both. Like others said it's what works best in each firearm. My pistols are not a problem with either. My 1873's like the TC the best, but my Marlins will jam on the TC's, but the RN run smoothly through both of them. You just need to experiment.

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RNFP works for me!!!!   :)

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I'm  running Bear Creek 125gr.  RNFPs in my B92. Just got it, so working on C.O.L. right now. Haven't tried any TCs yet.

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Right now I am shooting 125 gr. RNFP in both my pistols and my rifle with no problems. I'm going to get a box of TCFP to try out in the rifle. The RNFP cartridge is 1.485" OAL, whereas the TCFP cartridge I'm going to try is 1.575" OAL.  I know the TCFP will run fine in my Vaqueros, but I want to run the longer TCFP cartridge in my Henry to see if it will run with no problems. Just wanted everyone's opinion including all my pards in the Whiskey Row Gunslingers who I will be having our weekly breakfast with tomorrow morning.  

 

See you tomorrow morning TB. 

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8 hours ago, Garrison Joe, SASS #60708 said:

For toggle actions rifles, comparing equal bullet weight, the Truncated Cone will put more nose length out in front of the case, making feeding slicker and more reliable. 


When you say toggle-action, may I assume 1873 type?
It is my understanding the Marlin 1894 is not a link or toggle type, but named something else?  Carrier, or ??
Most of the Marlin shooters I speak with tell me the Marlin prefers RN.

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I've never loaded a round nose for CAS. I guess my rifle has to like TC's.

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On 1/15/2020 at 5:33 PM, bgavin said:

When you say toggle-action, may I assume 1873 type?

 

Well, you do not have to assume anything.  The 1860, the 1866 and the 1873 Winchester are the main toggle action designs made for pistol caliber cartridges.   Burgess made one as well. 

 

And, there were a couple of toggle actions in lever rifle-cartridge gun too.  You can look those up yourself.

 

On 1/15/2020 at 5:33 PM, bgavin said:

Most of the Marlin shooters I speak with tell me the Marlin prefers RN.

 

Don't know.  I've never loaded pistol cartridges for a pivoting carrier rifle.  Since the carrier does not enclose the round, it's quite possible that the action can bounce a round enough to "miss" the sweet spot to get into the chamber, especially at speed.    That's a major reason I've never wanted to shoot a pivoting carrier gun for SASS main matches.

 

Good luck, GJ

Edited by Garrison Joe, SASS #60708
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47 minutes ago, bgavin said:


When you say toggle-action, may I assume 1873 type?
It is my understanding the Marlin 1894 is not a link or toggle type, but named something else?  Carrier, or ??
Most of the Marlin shooters I speak with tell me the Marlin prefers RN.

RNFP, not RN.;)

When a M94 is tuned 'rite'. They will feed semi-wadcutter(SWC)bullets with ease. 

OLG 

 

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Yep.  I did mean LRNFP, but the fingers got stupid.

I didn't know the correct words to use to differentiate between the toggle and pivoting carrier types.

Edited by bgavin

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I've been loading 125 TCFP for the wife now for 3 years for her Marlin and pistols, never an issue yet. Knock on wood! Trust me---I'd be the first one to know after her:P:wub:

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16 hours ago, bgavin said:


When you say toggle-action, may I assume 1873 type?
It is my understanding the Marlin 1894 is not a link or toggle type, but named something else?  Carrier, or ??
Most of the Marlin shooters I speak with tell me the Marlin prefers RN.

I shoot TC in both my .38 and .45 Marlins.

 

In the .38 I use 140 or 180 grain lead.

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I found some animated YouTube material that details the operation of both toggle-link and pivot carrier operation.
These are visually very informative and well worth the 3 minutes each.

Winchester 1873

Marlin 336

 

 

Edited by bgavin
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I am shooting a Chey cast bullet 125 grain TCFP coated and they are awesome I think they’re the best bullet around

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i like RNFP for mine but i agree with trying both to choose what suits your need , i had issues with the truncated cone not feeding as smoothly in my rifle for me , worked great in the handguns tho as you might expect , they do not necessarily load the same in your dies 

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AZ Gunfighter,

 

my marlin and revolvers run Bear Creek RNFP

 

no grooves, so super easy to just crimp into the lead

 

 

 

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Edited by WOLFY
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I think if you have to "choose" one or the other your rifle isn't working right and the pistols will eat anything. I buy what the bullet makers sell locally to support them and they sell the TC 'round these parts.

 

PS Marlins excluded...…...

Edited by Cowboy Junky

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From what I see so far, the shape is partially determined by the weight.
For example, I have seen no RNFP in 105 grains.

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Quote

From what I see so far, the shape is partially determined by the weight.
For example, I have seen no RNFP in 105 grains.

 

Again, the Truncated Cone will put more nose length out in front of the case than a round nose flat point, making feeding slicker and more reliable.  

 

A 105 grain bullet is hard enough to get to feed in most lever guns.  So the usual design at that weight is TC to keep as much length as possible out ahead of the case mouth.

 

Good luck, GJ

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10 minutes ago, Garrison Joe, SASS #60708 said:

Again, the Truncated Cone will put more nose length out in front of the case than a round nose flat point, making feeding slicker and more reliable.  

...

A 105 grain bullet is hard enough to get to feed in most lever guns.  So the usual design at that weight is TC to keep as much length as possible out ahead of the case mouth.


That is most lucid explanation I have yet seen.  Thanks!
Extending this logic, it appears the TC is more desirable in 38SP cartridges for a longer OAL.

I bought the 105gr LTCFP specifically for low-recoil use in our revolvers.
I'm thinking 158gr is much better suited in the Marlin.

Edited by bgavin

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