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What type of ammo is this? - Photo links added now.


Father Kit Cool Gun Garth
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I'm visiting with my father-in-law and he brought out a bucket of old ammo to see if I was interested in any of it.
Most all of it was too old for my taste to shoot not knowing what kind of damage might occur when shot out of my new firearms.
Here are two photos if anyone can tell me what kind they are as I have never seen this type before.
Appreciate your help and MERRY CHRISTMAS.

 

http://i1305.photobucket.com/albums/s547/fatherkitcoolgungarth/bullet2_zpsw99dfsnw.jpg

 

http://i1305.photobucket.com/albums/s547/fatherkitcoolgungarth/bullet1_zpszddx4l5e.jpg

 

NOTE: Hopefully I've got them loaded above,

Edited by Father Kit Cool Gun Garth
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we used them all the time when i was much younger,,,, bang bang you're dead!!!

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NOT blanks-That is Winchester-Western .38 special 148 gn flat nose wadcutter for the S&W model 52 .38 Special semi-auto target pistol.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smith_%26_Wesson_Model_52

 

OLG

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the earlier replies were to the post before the pics were added

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Yep its a wadcutter bullet. I load them for my Bulls Eye target shooting. Makes a nice smooth, round hole in the paper! I shoot them in a S & W K38 Target Masterpiece revolver.

Edited by Big Sage, SASS #49891 Life
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Does this type of ammo result in less accuracy than round nose lead?

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Full wadcutter ammo is not used in CAS for a couple of reasons .

 

If bullet is BELOW flush with end of case, it's illegal by rule.

 

Won't feed well through lever or pump guns. Made to be shot in target revolvers.

 

Good luck, GJ

 

(Exact measurement correction applied)

Edited by Garrison Joe, SASS #60708
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Lumpy, some years back there was a round produced called the Bandit.

It was a full wad cutter flush with the case.

 

There was a big discussion over this round and it was decided it could not be used in SASS.

 

The company that produce the Bandit then made a change and made the Bandit II, which was the same round with the lead bullet extended out past the edge of the brass about 1/8".

The decision was made that the Bandit II was a legal round.

 

This set the president that any rounds with some lead extended out past the case rim would be legal.

Any round with flush with the case or recessed lead in to the case would not be legal.

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Is there a safety reason why the bullet need to extend past the brass? I am not arguing with the rule just wondering why.

Edited by Nickel City Dude
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Is there a safety reason why the bullet need to extend past the brass? I am not arguing with the rule just wondering why.

I was told so that loading officers could ensure shooters were loading lead bullets.

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Is there such a thing as a FMJ wadcutter?

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Wadcutter ammo is mainly used for paper targets. The wadcutter will cut a round hole on the paper target which is helpful with the scoring. If a round cuts the line of the next higher scoring ring on the target the higher score is counted. In some cases a target plug is inserted into the bullet hole to check the score value. While many are correct that the Smith & Wesson Mdl. 52(semi auto) used wadcutter ammo it was and is used in many other handguns for target shooting. Back in the old days when the wheel guns were the issue weapon of law enforcement they were also the handgun used in PPC competition. I fired many thousands of rounds of wadcutter ammo in my Smith & Wesson K frame with custom bull barrel and bomar rib. Most wadcutters are made from a softer lead blend then we use for SASS. We used to load 148 grain hollowbase wadcutters upside down for close shooting at skunks and other varmints. They were a cheap form of hollowpoint with terrific close range energy transfer to target.

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You can shoot the wadcutters in your revolver, but DON'T try to cycle them through your lever-action rifle.

 

They are too short, and without the rounded nose, these will not chamber and instead, will hang up, jam your rifle and will be a problem to clear.....every around. You could remove the magazine plug, but some wise "helper" at the unloading table will bugger up the slot on your mag tube plug trying to unscrew it. Just shoot them in your revolvers.

 

I will be exceptionally surprised if you have any failures to fire (FTF's).

 

Accuracy? These are highly accurate, and very low recoil.

 

Again, don't even think about cycling these through your lever-action rifle.

Edited by Cat Brules, SASS #14086
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Full wadcutter ammo is not used in CAS for a couple of reasons.

If bullet is flush with end of case, it's illegal by rule.

Won't feed well through lever or pump guns. Made to be shot in target revolvers.

 

Crimp the wadcutter where a little lead protrudes from the case and voila they are perfectly legal. Not gonna feed in a levergun tho unless it is a Widdermajic or other such similar wundergun.

Where in 'the book' does it state this?

OLG

GJ is correct as long as the smallest amount of the bullet protrudes it is perfectly legal. I have shot it a state and regional matches. Bullett 19707

Lumpy, some years back there was a round produced called the Bandit.

It was a full wad cutter flush with the case.

 

There was a big discussion over this round and it was decided it could not be used in SASS.

 

The company that produce the Bandit then made a change and made the Bandit II, which was the same round with the lead bullet extended out past the edge of the brass about 1/8".

The decision was made that the Bandit II was a legal round.

 

This set the president that any rounds with some lead extended out past the case rim would be legal.

Any round with flush with the case or recessed lead in to the case would not be legal.

"Ammunition with bullets recessed below the case mouth is disallowed."

SHB p.12

 

That is what the rule ACTUALLY says...

AT or beyond the mouth of the case is LEGAL.

Edited by PaleWolf Brunelle, #2495L
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PWB Glad youre doing well.

I shot a ton of wadcutter ammo in my pistols when a fiend gave it to me from his dads stash. Then he gave me some Ënglish Light Load"12 ga. I thought they would be great for CAS. English Light Load is British for Goose load.

Imis

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NOT blanks-That is Winchester-Western .38 special 148 gn flat nose wadcutter for the S&W model 52 .38 Special semi-auto target pistol.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smith_%26_Wesson_Model_52

 

OLG

+1

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WELCOME BACK PWB :excl::)

The reason I ask'd, was the bullet appears to 'just' go past the case mouth in the pictures.

PWB-Would you rule that a legal round? Looks to be so in the pictures?

That's why I asked about the rule in 'the-book'. ;)

OLG

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"Ammunition with bullets recessed below the case mouth is disallowed."

SHB p.12

 

That is what the rule ACTUALLY says...

AT or beyond the mouth of the case is LEGAL.

 

That's how I load HBWC to shoot in my .36 cal percussion pistols. Makes for a highly accurate BP round.

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