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John Boy

What information do you put on the labels of your bullet boxes?

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For clarity ^ future reference, I put the following information on the boxes:

* Bullet name

* Diameter

* Weight

* Alloy Ratio

* Powder charge

* Brand of powder

* Date of reloads

Also a label on the side of the box for easy identification for stacked boxes

All done with a Dymo label maker

Did I miss any information?

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For cowboy loads:

bullet weight

powder type & charge

On a piece of blue painters tape.(easy to change)

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I don't bother with much, if any of that. I put the caliber and use a color label that corresponds with the color I mark my rounds. Otherwise, bullet name is always big lube, powder is always black, amount is how much I can cram in the case, and I shoot them up way too fast to worry about a date.

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I put date on my 38 Sp, mostly because I usually load 100-1500 or so at a time. Don't want to have a box get "old"

 

My others I don't worry that much, if I'm loading with BP I put a black sharpie mark on primer.

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I don't use boxes. I use 3 gal. Pails. Each color has a specific load like blue is my trailboss load. Green is my clays...etc. My big match ammo i pot in 1 gal redwing crocks. I generally load in bulk. (2 to 3 thousand at a run) Any test loads i write date powder bullet primer brass powder charge

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I put the powder batch number on the label as well as the batch number of the primers - including the primer manufacturer.

Date loaded always goes on.

 

If there is a batch recall, I want to be able to identify which boxes are affected.

 

STL Suomi

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I only load one caliber, (.44-40) one load for cowboy shooting so I don't need no stinkin' labels :lol:

 

I load .45 acp but I have no need to label them either, all the same there too! ;)

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New un-tested loads, bullet weight, powder name and charge weight. They will remain boxed until tested. If the load works, then I will use it until I have to change powders. I now have about 4-5 different loads for 38's in case we have powder issues later in the future.

 

Tested and proven loads are recorded in my diary/load book and bulk loaded rounds go in a box. My book entries include date, caliber, bullet weight, powder, RCBS rotor size and number of rotations, primer make, powder charge and number of rounds loaded. The box is never so full that it doesn't get any "old" ammo. I keep 18 bags filled in my shooting box which I rotate as I use them.

Edited by Clueless Bob

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KISS. I use bullet wt in g and mfg. I use powder mfg and weight in g. I identify whether new or used brass and mfg of brass (I sort it before loading). I put the date I made the rounds and check mark that every round went through a case checker. Why identify anything more about the bullet ie hardness, diameter, etc?

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My boxes say "Creeker Main Match" or "Creeker Practice". I know what caliber, bullet and powder they are.

The only difference between practice and match ammo is the condition/ age of the brass.

And if I have any nickel cases in the mix; they get a black stripe across the primer (so I know that's a pistol round only)

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For cowboy loads:

bullet weight

powder type & charge

On a piece of blue painters tape.(easy to change)

Exactly what I do.

 

Best regards,

Slate

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Howdy

 

Caliber

Date

Powder

Powder Charge

Bullet Name

Bullet Weight

Brass Brand

Primer

 

This is a box of Black Powder 45 Colt loads. The powder charge is Cubic Centimeters, because that is how I have my BP powder measures set up. If it was Smokeless, the weight would be in grains.

 

Please excuse the poor penmanship, I have had terrible hand writing all my life.

 

 

Ammo%20Box%2045%20Colt_zpsizybwaak.jpg

 

 

 

 

As far as bullet diameter I keep that information in my loading notebook.

Edited by Driftwood Johnson, SASS #38283

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I normally put a card inside the box showing bullet weight/type and Powder charge.

 

EXAMPLE for my .45 Colt stuff:

 

300 Speer GDHP

18.5 LilGun

 

EXAMPLE ONLY !

 

I also keep a folder for each caliber showing Chrono results, date, temperature.... and I also distinguish Rifle or Pistol and barrel length....etc...

 

 

..........Widder

Edited by Widowmaker Hill SASS #59054

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I only load one caliber, (.44-40) one load for cowboy shooting so I don't need no stinkin' labels :lol:

 

I load .45 acp but I have no need to label them either, all the same there too! ;)

Great minds think alike.

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Great minds think alike.

;)

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None, I color code everything with different Sharpies on the bottom of the brass (after I checked for hi-primer) :D BP gets one black stripe, if the case is headed for splitsville it get two black dots (for pistol only) ;) Normal Red Dot gets a red and green stripe, hotter loads red only. Clays is blue. I put a small x on the bottom of shotshells, four or five Xs on an STS means they are now ready for BP, and those get a big X, which means they will be trashed. I pour all of my bullets so I can tell just by looking.what bullet it is. I also mark the batches of lead, randomly on the end of 1lb ingots, I run about a 10.5 for most of my CAS shooting. Good Luck :)

 

Jefro :ph34r: Relax-Enjoy

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For cowboy loads:

bullet weight

powder type & charge

On a piece of blue painters tape.(easy to change)

Same but I take all the split cases and they get labeled TACO main match

Jk she does a great job at inspecting all the ammo

 

Billy the Avenger

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For cowboy loads:

bullet weight

powder type & charge

On a piece of blue painters tape.(easy to change)

Exactly!

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I just write the powder type and charge weight plus primer under the die box lid. Also have a dummy round inside the box with the proper brass make for that load, and its seated proper length . I only do that for my sharps, and modern accurate stuff. The cowboy ammo is adjusted on the Dillon. Maybe I should write more down, but it works.

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I generally don't as I rarely change my loads and use just one for both rifle and pistol.

 

But, I did just change my load so have been putting the cutoff side of a primer sleeve with something to tell me it's the new load in each box. I also make a note on those made with brand new brass.

 

I'm about thru my stockpile so I'll likely change to labeling the old load boxes to maybe keep around for when I wan a little extra thump.

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Simple!! Black. Smokeless.

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I put the powder batch number on the label as well as the batch number of the primers

St Louis - I like the idea of knowing the primer lot number

 

I also shoot a lot of BPCR reloads for my non SASS reloads. The same information on my SASS reloads also is on the box but I use a pencil written label on the inside of the lid with additional information:

* Grade of powder

* Compression of the powder

* COL of the round

* Two columns for my vernier settings: Yards and Meters with vernier readings applicable to 100 - 200 - 300 -385- 400 - 500 - 600 - 700 - 800 - 900 and 1000 based on the distance they were shot for a given day. Reason for using a pencil is because the vernier settings will change based on the weather

* Remarks - is where the weather conditions are noted for the last day I shot a given box of reloads

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Black Powder .38-40, 185 RNFP, Goex 3F

Black Powder .45 Colt, 270 RNFP, Goex 3F

 

Smokless get More Complete data on the box ...

 

All loads have their data written in the record book including things like, velocity , SD. ,Group size, Etc...

 

 

Jabez Cowboy

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Black Powder .38-40, 185 RNFP, Goex 3F

Black Powder .45 Colt, 270 RNFP, Goex 3F

 

Smokless get More Complete data on the box ...

 

All loads have their data written in the record book including things like, velocity , SD. ,Group size, Etc...

 

 

Jabez Cowboy

 

Howdy Jabez.

 

Although I don't keep a 'record' of group size, I do keep some of the more important targets that show both good and bad grouping of certain powders. This helps me from buying the 'inaccurate' stuff and wasting my time in the future.

 

One other thing I have done with my 'Pairs' of pistols is Chronograph EACH pistol.

 

I have one set of Ruger Vaq. that actually have a velocity difference of about 25 fps with identical loads. And my Chronograph results were consistent with varies powders and bullet weights.

One pistol just has a higher velocity average than the other pistol.

 

 

..........Widder

Edited by Widowmaker Hill SASS #59054

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Widder, mebbe you're piling the trigger a little harder on those faster pistols :)

 

Kajun

Edited by Krazy Kajun

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John Boy,

 

I use different color boxes to differentiate pistol vs rifle reloads, as they may be slightly different (bullet weight, primer, powder and charge weight). I keep info on Post Its inside the box . Also, I keep a log with the same info so that I tell what date they were loaded, number etc. I also keep a note on the powder can that tells how many rounds were loaded, no. of grains, on any one day, and the same for the primers and bullets. A bit obsessive, but it works for me.

 

All the best.

 

Tex

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All my CAS loads are exactly the same. Same local bullet maker, Clays powder and Federal primers. Loads are proven and well tested, so there is NEVER any change. SO, who needs any stinkin' labels!!!!

 

Dated? Why? Loads will be good for years, and I usually use up my current loaded batches in less than a year. There simply is no need to label anything. All load data is kept in my reference book, to keep it handy if needed.

 

RBK

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Glad you posted this John Boy. I use the same info Yusta B posted but I used some nifty labels I found at Office Depot. Long story short, I loaded up a bunch of 30-30 and 38-55 loads about 10 years ago. I was trying different powders and load combinations. They were all safe loads, nothing crazy. I stuck these labels on my plastic ammo boxes. Over the years of moving around those labels came "unglued". I had a box of plastic boxes full of cartridges and a bunch of loose labels floating around in the box with them.

 

I use blue masking tape now.

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I keep all the particulars on a load in my "Reloading Records" book and assign a "Lot #" to each as I load them. Whether a couple hundred or a thousand. Put the Lot # on the box I take to the matches and usually sharpie mark the ones I use in the rifle as they are newer brass. If anything runs amuck I can just go back to my book to learn the particulars. I.E. powder, bullet brand etc. Beginning to wonder if all that data each time is really worth it as once settled on a load ---nothing changes.

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Month and year

same here

I do mark all the pistol with a black stripe and rifle loads with a red stripe.

 

use Red Dot for everything and I can tell bullets by shape

 

put new reloads on bottom of stack so I 'rotate my stock'

 

cr

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Howdy Jabez.

 

Although I don't keep a 'record' of group size, I do keep some of the more important targets that show both good and bad grouping of certain powders. This helps me from buying the 'inaccurate' stuff and wasting my time in the future.

 

One other thing I have done with my 'Pairs' of pistols is Chronograph EACH pistol.

 

I have one set of Ruger Vaq. that actually have a velocity difference of about 25 fps with identical loads. And my Chronograph results were consistent with varies powders and bullet weights.

One pistol just has a higher velocity average than the other pistol.

 

 

..........Widder

 

 

Howdy Pard;

 

I have one 4 5/8 inch gun that turns in higher velocities than my 5 1/2 inch gun with most

powders, both are in .45 Colt .... I have Two 4 5/8 inch and one 5 1/2 in guns that I use for Cowboy they shoot good for Windage

with every powder tried so far ,,, With the exception of one gun using Win.231 powder this one gun shoots a

foot left at 25 yards when using my standard load of 231 .... All my other guns including rifles shoot this

load right down the middle ... So if I'm using 231 this gun gets to take a break from the action...

With Promo, Red Dot , True Blue , 700X , etc. and 3F it shoots on center ...

My records are very complete as to velocities and other varibles in loading ammo ....

 

All the best this Turkey season and for Christmas to you and yours ...

 

Jabez Cowboy

quote]

Edited by Jabez Cowboy,SASS # 50129

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357s in the green boxes,

38s in the blue boxes,

50 38s and 50 32s in the neon green boxes,

45 ACP in the red or the white boxes,

Practice ammo in the 3 lb coffee can marked "Practice"

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357s in the green boxes,

38s in the blue boxes,

50 38s and 50 32s in the neon green boxes,

45 ACP in the red or the white boxes,

Practice ammo in the 3 lb coffee can marked "Practice"

I'm beginning to get into the colored box I.D. for calibers & in one caliber for loads(.32 Mag). Makes it easier to pack up ammo when 3 people go shooting with different calibers & loads. Also transitioning to 100 rnd boxes,

Edited by Yusta B.

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