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JohnWesleyHardin

Splatter

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I got hit in the mouth today with a ricochet so hard I literally thought I lost some teeth.  Never been hit that hard with splatter.  It literally stunned me for a few seconds.

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Wherever you were shooting, there are some REALLY poor targets.  

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Was it the pistol targets on the Saloon stage? I got hit pretty good there while at the unloading table. I'm setting up next month so if ya let me know the stage I'll try and change the targets.

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21 minutes ago, Colorado Coffinmaker said:

 

Wherever you were shooting, there are some REALLY poor targets.  

 

WOW, then every range I've shoot at for the past 20+ years must have some really poor targets!

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When your targets are within spitting distance then yeah ricochets are a risk

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Three years ago, I was spotting for a shooter, when a nearly complete 200 grain .45 bullet came straight back from the target, over his shoulder, and hit me just below the right eye.  Felt like Saturday night downtown after the rodeo! Made me see stars for a couple seconds, and pretty much destroyed my Wiley-X shooting glasses. The plastic distorted and absorbed the impact, I had quite a shiner and the right side of my face was swollen up for a couple days, but I got to keep my eye. I can't say enough about buying quality shooting glasses. A hundred bucks vs. being called One-eyed Johnson for the rest of my days... easy choice!

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I’ sure glad to here you didn’t suffer a serious injury.  I know that can be of great concern.  it makes me think that it might be smart to pick up a silicon rubber “moldable” mouthpiece at Walmart to add to your safety gear.  I think I’ll do that, too.  They are generally used by school kids in contact sports.

 

I was watching a revolver “shoot off” at an annual match (some years ago now) and was struck directly in my left eye by a pretty large piece of ricochet lead.  It damaged my shooting/ballistic glasses.  It was a nasty experience.  I’m glad I had those “expensive” glasses.  There’s no such thing as mil-spec ballistic glasses being “too expensive”.
 

Cat Brules

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15 minutes ago, TheOtherLeft said:

When your targets are within spitting distance then yeah ricochets are a risk

Ricochets are a "risk" anytime you are shooting a hard projectile at another hard surface.

Out of all the factors that determine splatter intensity - distance is but one of them and is NOT the primary.

 

Splatter is USUALLY/ PRIMARILY caused by poor quality targets (cratered, pockmarked, curved, etc), or by stands/ hanging systems that get struck by projectiles and return them towards the firing line.

 

Splatter is also commonly caused by plates being struck at extreme angles relative to the firing line.  I. E. Shooting at angles instead of straight on.

 

IF your venue utilizes poor quality targets/ stands and engages with poor angles on the targets - then Yes, extreme target distance could possibly assist with mitigation of splatter - but to make any significant difference; the plates would need to be placed at such extreme distances that splatter would no longer be an issue as no one would be attending your events.

 

Properly prepared, good quality targets with a 30-45 degree vertical hanging angle that directs lead into the ground instead of back towards the firinging line - along with either hidden stands or sacrificial stands (wood) that absorb splatter instead of bouncing it can make distance a moot concern.

 

It amazes me to listen to otherwise intelligent people expound on splatter - trying to convince anyone (or themselves) that somehow the same plate being struck at 4 yards will spit back splatter hard enough to cause injury or loosen teeth - but magically, move that same pockmarked and steel rebar poorly hung plate out to 7 yards and suddenly any bullet that strikes it dissolved into feathers and puppy kisses. 

 

I have been struck by splatter from rounds fired in the next bay.

I have swept lead splatter from the bed of my truck parked in the lot, far outside the bay.

These incidents occurred at distances well beyond the target array distances that even the most diehard long range cowboy shooter would approve of.

 

The commonality of these events were ALWAYS target quality/ hanging method - not distance to target.

 

I have written a match or two and set steel for a few more over the last 20 years - trust me; I know what I'm saying.

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1 hour ago, Creeker, SASS #43022 said:

Ricochets are a "risk" anytime you are shooting a hard projectile at another hard surface.

Out of all the factors that determine splatter intensity - distance is but one of them and is NOT the primary.

 

Splatter is USUALLY/ PRIMARILY caused by poor quality targets (cratered, pockmarked, curved, etc), or by stands/ hanging systems that get struck by projectiles and return them towards the firing line.

 

Splatter is also commonly caused by plates being struck at extreme angles relative to the firing line.  I. E. Shooting at angles instead of straight on.

 

IF your venue utilizes poor quality targets/ stands and engages with poor angles on the targets - then Yes, extreme target distance could possibly assist with mitigation of splatter - but to make any significant difference; the plates would need to be placed at such extreme distances that splatter would no longer be an issue as no one would be attending your events.

 

Properly prepared, good quality targets with a 30-45 degree vertical hanging angle that directs lead into the ground instead of back towards the firinging line - along with either hidden stands or sacrificial stands (wood) that absorb splatter instead of bouncing it can make distance a moot concern.

 

It amazes me to listen to otherwise intelligent people expound on splatter - trying to convince anyone (or themselves) that somehow the same plate being struck at 4 yards will spit back splatter hard enough to cause injury or loosen teeth - but magically, move that same pockmarked and steel rebar poorly hung plate out to 7 yards and suddenly any bullet that strikes it dissolved into feathers and puppy kisses. 

 

I have been struck by splatter from rounds fired in the next bay.

I have swept lead splatter from the bed of my truck parked in the lot, far outside the bay.

These incidents occurred at distances well beyond the target array distances that even the most diehard long range cowboy shooter would approve of.

 

The commonality of these events were ALWAYS target quality/ hanging method - not distance to target.

 

I have written a match or two and set steel for a few more over the last 20 years - trust me; I know what I'm saying.

AT the NY State match my camper was about 200 yards back from bays 2 and 3.  At pack up I had lead bits falling off my awning as it rolled up.  

It happens even with good targets set on good stands.  ALWAYS keep your glasses on! 

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Not a steel related "Splatter" but I caught my own 200g 45 slug in the chest after shooting a bowling pin.  It was like getting kicked by a horse.  The bullet was not deformed other than rifling marks.  I reloaded it again! 

 

Never shot a bowling pin with cowboy loads again though. 

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7 hours ago, TheOtherLeft said:

When your targets are within spitting distance then yeah ricochets are a risk

Bull.

 

Target condition

Target angle

Secondary surfaces

Ground condition

 

Stop spreading myths

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Posted (edited)

Splatter happens. Wear good eye protection. Target distance has little to do with it. Most splatter comes off of target stands and shotgun targets. Shoot paper and you won't get splatter, or have fun.

Edited by Assassin
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PLUS ONE too Creeker and Phantom.  Especially Phantom on this one.  

 

Splatter is the result of Simple Physics.  Poor Targets Poorly presented.

 

Part two:  STOP SPREADING MYTHS.

 

CLYDE HENRY:  Glad you recognize that.

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Posted (edited)

Hee hee! I got hit by an entire bullet once. It was a pocket pistol bullet. I forget the caliber. We were shooting a plastic coffee can lid. It was so close that the bullet came back and hit me. Never had anything like that happen with a lead steel target; although, I have been hit, rarely, by splatter.

 

The splatter thingy doesn't happen much anymore. People have learned the basics of target hanging (it is all about the targets, ground, and stands not the distance) and the dangers of pocked targets.

 

When this topic comes up, I like to share Calamity Jane's splatter report. Dang, the figures won't C&P.

 

 

Splatter Isn’t Necessary Calamity Jane Canary SASS 40978 Life

I notice there’s a lot of chatter about "bounce back", splatter, and the (supposed) role "wimp loads" play in people getting hit with lead. I have also noticed that getting hit with splatter seems to be quite common and seems to be regarded as one of the hazards of the game.

I don’t believe it HAS to be this way.

Being the anal-retentive (engineering) type that I am, I decided to give some serious thought to the matter of shooters and spectators being hit by lead at Cowboy Action matches.

The Research

Prior to constructing our targets and stands, we did a little research. First, we polled the people on The SASS Wire about target construction and occurrences of splatter or "bounce back" and we received some good advice on target design and stand construction (as well as some BS that doesn’t make sense to anyone who passed high school physics). We built some targets and did some experiments in the winter snow to see where the bullets and fragments went with various loads, from "hot loads" right down below "wimp loads".

One of the first things that was apparent was that there is no such thing as "bounce back" from a properly designed and supported target and that splatter is predictable and controllable!

"Hot loads" disintegrate when striking a target and the debris flies off in a predictable pattern from the target face as "splatter"

If there is nothing in the debris path to deflect the debris back toward the shooter, the debris all lands within the "spray zone" and safely down range. Very light loads (right down to hand-thrown), strike the target, impart their energy to the target, and fall to the ground within a foot or two of the target. The lower the bullet velocity, the more of the original mass that is retained in the slug that falls to the ground and the less of the bullet mass that goes off as spray. With a high velocity round, most of the bullet’s lead goes off in small fragments as spray within the spray zone.

With multiple targets, it is important that two targets together do not form a "double bounce" path back to the firing line (or other points behind the line).

Target & Stand Design

To lessen the chance of ricochet, our targets and stands were designed to ensure there are no "included angles" approaching 180 degrees (see Figure 2). For this same reason, we do NOT use re-bar for target stands since re-bar has a textured surface which creates an unpredictable deflection of the spray; we use hot rolled steel rod which has a smooth surface.

Figure 2

Our targets are all made from 3/8 or 1/2" mild steel plate. They were laid out in AutoCAD (to preclude any 180 degree included angles) and CNC cut by a local steel supplier (to ensure smooth edges).

Our stands are tripods (with three links of chain welded to the rods to form the pivot). The back leg of the tripod is planted firmly in the ground so that it is at right angles to the firing line (this ensures that the target will remain at a right angle to the firing line) and the two supporting legs are positioned BEHIND the target face and out of the spray zone.

Our hangers (target mounts) were designed to ensure the target is free to swing (when hit by a bullet), will always hang with the target angled slightly downward (when viewed by the shooter), and that the target will remain parallel to the firing line during the match. The hangers are simply short length of iron pipe that have been slit on the bandsaw. One tab is bent into the pipe so the hanger will slip on to the stand a few inches. The other tab is bent into a hook to hold the target see Figure 3.

Figure 3

Secured to the back of each hanging target is 2 links of "binder chain" (Binder chain is a flat chain that will only flex in one direction - it's cheap!) (see Figure 4). The chain ensures the targets don't rotate from side to side in the breeze. The binder chain is bolted to a threaded hole in the targets and the end of the bolt (facing the shooter) is ground off flush with the target face (see Figure 5). The chain is attached slightly below the top of the target to ensure the target angles slightly downward (with the bottom of the target farther away from the shooter - see Figure 6)

Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6

With the target hung in this manner, it will remain parallel to the firing line (as set by the rear leg of the tripod), will hang at the proper angle, the feet of the tripod are behind the spray zone, and the joint in the tripod is behind the target. All this combines to leave the spray zone free of any obstruction that could redirect bullet fragments back toward the firing line.

These are some of our targets (see Figure 7).

Target Placement

Even with good targets and stands, it is very important that the targets be placed correctly and that the splatter pattern is considered when doing the range setup for a match.

Placement of each target must consider WHAT is within the spray pattern! Other targets, props, even rocks or stones on the ground can provide a second surface that will direct spray or bullet fragments back toward the shooter. This should (hopefully) be in the mind of the stage writers when laying out target patterns but the final check should be made by the Range Safety Officer after the targets are set out. Stand beside each target facing the firing line, extend your arms out parallel to the target face, and see what is close to the plane of the target, with the splatter zone. Bear in mind that splatter can travel a long distance and will fan out in a full circular disk parallel to the target face - anything within that zone WILL be hit by splatter.

The Worst Targets and Stands

Among the worst targets I have encountered for spray and ricochet are round pipes suspended vertically - they are virtually guaranteed to cause spray and ricochet all over the range. Any flat target that is placed at an angle to the firing line WILL put spectators and other shooters within the spray zone. Re-bar stands, because of their textured surface, WILL send spray in unpredictable directions.

Calamity’s Challenge

If anyone anywhere experiences "bounce back" or splatter from targets designed, supported, and placed as described in this article, please carefully record the details and forward them to me (pictures would also help). In my humble opinion, there is no reason that any Cowboy Action shooter needs to experience splatter at a match. This is a hazard we can eliminate but only through careful study and analysis. Assuming "this" or "that" is the reason someone got hit is not good enough - urban legends and suppositions wont cure the problem but science can.

We are in our second year using "Calamity’s super deluxe engineered targets and stands" and have not had a single case of a shooter being hit by spray or bullet fragments. I don’t see any reason why it shouldn’t be that way at every range!

Calamity's Splatter Report-1.pdf

Edited by Allie Mo, SASS No. 25217
lead steel
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7 hours ago, Nutmeg Ryder, SASS # 74966 said:

Not a steel related "Splatter" but I caught my own 200g 45 slug in the chest after shooting a bowling pin.  It was like getting kicked by a horse.  The bullet was not deformed other than rifling marks.  I reloaded it again! 

 

Never shot a bowling pin with cowboy loads again though. 

 

They come back off pins even with hot "pin loads" I shot Richard Davis' Second Chance match for years and saw a lot of ricochets. Bad thing about pins is a slug gets stuck in the wood and a later round clips it and sends it to parts unknown. The wife caught one 200 yds from the firing line on the top of her head. It came off a pin, cleared a 25ft lexan shield behind the shooters and came down on her. She still has that slug to this day. 

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10 hours ago, Creeker, SASS #43022 said:

...I have been struck by splatter from rounds fired in the next bay....

 

Seems that most of the time that I get hit hard by a big piece, it came from another stage.  Hits from the stage I'm at are shotgun splatter more often.

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Allie - sure do miss Calamity Jane Canary

She used to be a frequent poster on the older forums.  She even made a a wheel carriage cannon that shot 'big' reloads

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10 hours ago, Nutmeg Ryder, SASS # 74966 said:

Not a steel related "Splatter" but I caught my own 200g 45 slug in the chest after shooting a bowling pin.  It was like getting kicked by a horse.  The bullet was not deformed other than rifling marks.  I reloaded it again! 

 

Never shot a bowling pin with cowboy loads again though. 

see if you really cant get all 10 pins to go down, shooting that last one just ain't a good idea

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2 hours ago, Abilene, SASS # 27489 said:

 

Seems that most of the time that I get hit hard by a big piece, it came from another stage.  Hits from the stage I'm at are shotgun splatter more often.

 

During a shoot many years ago I was talking to Cole Chance when he was hit by a heavy .45 bullet ricochet'd from another bay.  Heck... might've been from two or maybe more bays away!

 

Now, Cole was a fairly stout lad, but when it hit 'im with a fairly lout "Whop!" it damn near knocked 'im over.   I do seem to recall him saying something about it smarting a mite....  :rolleyes:

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ALLIE MO!!!  PLUS A HUGE ONE.  Thank you for posting Calamity Jane Canary's "Study."  I have been harping for years about the cause of Back Splatter.  It seems there are far too many whom "Know What they Know" and simply PARROT what they have heard from others whom also DO NOT understand and are not willing to accept the science.  It's simple Physics.  Close, Far, Velocity, Hardness don't play.  Properly set up, bullet fragments will go DOWN.  Butt,  and a BIG BUTT, it also MUST be considered what the fragments are goin DOWN into.  It's all simple science.  Well .. maybe not so  simple but readily available.

 

THANK YOU

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THANX! Allie Mo, for sharing the text of Calamity Jane’s “splatter report,” and for making the .pdf file version available to download.

===>  PALEWOLF:
Would it be appropriate for you to grab Calamity’s .pdf file (for downloading), and the expanded text, and making it a “sticky” topic for the Wire?
 
Cat Brules
 
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14 hours ago, Three Foot Johnson said:

Three years ago, I was spotting for a shooter, when a nearly complete 200 grain .45 bullet came straight back from the target, over his shoulder, and hit me just below the right eye.  Felt like Saturday night downtown after the rodeo! Made me see stars for a couple seconds, and pretty much destroyed my Wiley-X shooting glasses. The plastic distorted and absorbed the impact, I had quite a shiner and the right side of my face was swollen up for a couple days, but I got to keep my eye. I can't say enough about buying quality shooting glasses. A hundred bucks vs. being called One-eyed Johnson for the rest of my days... easy choice!

You come up with some great aliases.:lol:

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14 minutes ago, Cat Brules said:
===>  PALEWOLF:
Would it be appropriate for you to grab Calamity’s .pdf file (for downloading), and the expanded text, and making it a “sticky” topic for the Wire?

 

DONE

 

 

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C'mon now, yer gonna draw the grade school fart joke mentalities out of the weeds again. :lol:

1 minute ago, Yul Lose said:

You come up with some great aliases.:lol:

 

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Posted (edited)

I've noticed that with properly set up targets, the larger fragments do go down.  That is what we want.  If you have water under the target you can see the splash.  If sand, you will see the line in the sand.

 

But the physics are such that "powder" will go in sort of a plane in 360 degrees - up down, left right - sort of like a dinner plate at the same angle as the target is set.  The upper portion of the splatter go well over our heads - (and dump into that pickup parked in back :D)  Since it is relatively fine it is much safer.  And since it is fine (light), travels far and is only gravity fed when it falls it is no real danger.  But I've seen at many ranges where the lead powder can fall. 

 

And a pick-up (or car  hood)  in the right place is a good way to discover it.

Edited by Marauder SASS #13056

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52 minutes ago, Branchwater Jack SASS #88854 said:

Sure would be nice if the wire let me download attachments. I would really have liked to read that one.

I just downloaded and am reading it, so the problem is not with SASS wire.

 

Also, your signature does not disavow offensiveness; There was nothing in the post I'm replying to or any post of your's I have seen which I considered offensive, just a suggestion for completeness. :D

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2 minutes ago, John Kloehr said:

I just downloaded and am reading it, so the problem is not with SASS wire.

 

Sure looks like a SASS Wire problem to me...

 

Screenshot_20200614-181339.thumb.png.11dab05a602b7f4caa53e8dc2bdd6c2d.png

 

I bet you can update your profile page background image, too...

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I took a 45 slug to the leg at one match years ago.  I moved farther from the line and at an angle I thought was safer.  Then I took one to the groin.  After I could speak in a natural voice again, I excused myself and hung it up for the day.  Not my home club, was in the area for other things and was trying to squeeze in a match.

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47 minutes ago, Branchwater Jack SASS #88854 said:

 

Sure looks like a SASS Wire problem to me...

 

Screenshot_20200614-181339.thumb.png.11dab05a602b7f4caa53e8dc2bdd6c2d.png

 

I bet you can update your profile page background image, too...

If you mean profile page cover photo, I just did.

 

So I still maintain it is not a SASS Wire problem, something is clearly the matter with you.

 

Assuming you are not using a private browsing window, or some non-standard browser, it s=could still be a permissions/groups problem with your profile in the InVision database. Which is not a SASS Wire software issue. It is something the matter with you. And by that, I mean something to do with your info in the database, not something to do with BO or any personal issue.

 

Report this post to the moderators, and see if they can take a look at the settings for your account here.

 

And the specific error message? that is actually the normal message for an attachment which no longer exists, or for an attachment being downloaded by someone not logged in. Since you can post and the attachment is there (for me anyway),  the file should be downloadable to both of us... And in the same vein, you should be able to upload a profile page cover photo.

 

So, something about your profile unless you have some browser anonimization that makes a download/upload look like it is coming from a not-logged-in member.

 

Seriously, just report this post and let the admins take a look at your account permissions. And while they are at it, they should move your and my posts over to the forum help section. Yes, now I'm making more work for them!

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33 minutes ago, John Kloehr said:

So I still maintain it is not a SASS Wire problem, something is clearly the matter with you.

 

More accurately, it is an issue with my SASS Wire profile

 

35 minutes ago, John Kloehr said:

If you mean profile page cover photo, I just did.

 

I can't do that, either...

 

36 minutes ago, John Kloehr said:

So, something about your profile unless you have some browser anonimization that makes a download/upload look like it is coming from a not-logged-in member.

 

Seriously, just report this post and let the admins take a look at your account permissions. And while they are at it, they should move your and my posts over to the forum help section. Yes, now I'm making more work for them!

 

They haven't been able to figure it out yet.

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Posted (edited)

@Branchwater Jack SASS #88854 PM me your email, and I'll send you the file. The permissions problem is no reason to hold up a read of the document.

Edited by John Kloehr

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10 hours ago, Allie Mo, SASS No. 25217 said:

Hee hee! I got hit by an entire bullet once. It was a pocket pistol bullet. I forget the caliber. We were shooting a plastic coffee can lid. It was so close that the bullet came back and hit me. Never had anything like that happen with a lead target; although, I have been hit, rarely, by splatter.

 

The splatter thingy doesn't happen much anymore. People have learned the basics of target hanging (it is all about the targets, ground, and stands not the distance) and the dangers of pocked targets.

 

When this topic comes up, I like to share Calamity Jane's splatter report. Dang, the figures won't C&P.

 

 

Splatter Isn’t Necessary Calamity Jane Canary SASS 40978 Life

I notice there’s a lot of chatter about "bounce back", splatter, and the (supposed) role "wimp loads" play in people getting hit with lead. I have also noticed that getting hit with splatter seems to be quite common and seems to be regarded as one of the hazards of the game.

I don’t believe it HAS to be this way.

Being the anal-retentive (engineering) type that I am, I decided to give some serious thought to the matter of shooters and spectators being hit by lead at Cowboy Action matches.

The Research

Prior to constructing our targets and stands, we did a little research. First, we polled the people on The SASS Wire about target construction and occurrences of splatter or "bounce back" and we received some good advice on target design and stand construction (as well as some BS that doesn’t make sense to anyone who passed high school physics). We built some targets and did some experiments in the winter snow to see where the bullets and fragments went with various loads, from "hot loads" right down below "wimp loads".

One of the first things that was apparent was that there is no such thing as "bounce back" from a properly designed and supported target and that splatter is predictable and controllable!

"Hot loads" disintegrate when striking a target and the debris flies off in a predictable pattern from the target face as "splatter"

If there is nothing in the debris path to deflect the debris back toward the shooter, the debris all lands within the "spray zone" and safely down range. Very light loads (right down to hand-thrown), strike the target, impart their energy to the target, and fall to the ground within a foot or two of the target. The lower the bullet velocity, the more of the original mass that is retained in the slug that falls to the ground and the less of the bullet mass that goes off as spray. With a high velocity round, most of the bullet’s lead goes off in small fragments as spray within the spray zone.

With multiple targets, it is important that two targets together do not form a "double bounce" path back to the firing line (or other points behind the line).

Target & Stand Design

To lessen the chance of ricochet, our targets and stands were designed to ensure there are no "included angles" approaching 180 degrees (see Figure 2). For this same reason, we do NOT use re-bar for target stands since re-bar has a textured surface which creates an unpredictable deflection of the spray; we use hot rolled steel rod which has a smooth surface.

Figure 2

Our targets are all made from 3/8 or 1/2" mild steel plate. They were laid out in AutoCAD (to preclude any 180 degree included angles) and CNC cut by a local steel supplier (to ensure smooth edges).

Our stands are tripods (with three links of chain welded to the rods to form the pivot). The back leg of the tripod is planted firmly in the ground so that it is at right angles to the firing line (this ensures that the target will remain at a right angle to the firing line) and the two supporting legs are positioned BEHIND the target face and out of the spray zone.

Our hangers (target mounts) were designed to ensure the target is free to swing (when hit by a bullet), will always hang with the target angled slightly downward (when viewed by the shooter), and that the target will remain parallel to the firing line during the match. The hangers are simply short length of iron pipe that have been slit on the bandsaw. One tab is bent into the pipe so the hanger will slip on to the stand a few inches. The other tab is bent into a hook to hold the target see Figure 3.

Figure 3

Secured to the back of each hanging target is 2 links of "binder chain" (Binder chain is a flat chain that will only flex in one direction - it's cheap!) (see Figure 4). The chain ensures the targets don't rotate from side to side in the breeze. The binder chain is bolted to a threaded hole in the targets and the end of the bolt (facing the shooter) is ground off flush with the target face (see Figure 5). The chain is attached slightly below the top of the target to ensure the target angles slightly downward (with the bottom of the target farther away from the shooter - see Figure 6)

Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6

With the target hung in this manner, it will remain parallel to the firing line (as set by the rear leg of the tripod), will hang at the proper angle, the feet of the tripod are behind the spray zone, and the joint in the tripod is behind the target. All this combines to leave the spray zone free of any obstruction that could redirect bullet fragments back toward the firing line.

These are some of our targets (see Figure 7).

Target Placement

Even with good targets and stands, it is very important that the targets be placed correctly and that the splatter pattern is considered when doing the range setup for a match.

Placement of each target must consider WHAT is within the spray pattern! Other targets, props, even rocks or stones on the ground can provide a second surface that will direct spray or bullet fragments back toward the shooter. This should (hopefully) be in the mind of the stage writers when laying out target patterns but the final check should be made by the Range Safety Officer after the targets are set out. Stand beside each target facing the firing line, extend your arms out parallel to the target face, and see what is close to the plane of the target, with the splatter zone. Bear in mind that splatter can travel a long distance and will fan out in a full circular disk parallel to the target face - anything within that zone WILL be hit by splatter.

The Worst Targets and Stands

Among the worst targets I have encountered for spray and ricochet are round pipes suspended vertically - they are virtually guaranteed to cause spray and ricochet all over the range. Any flat target that is placed at an angle to the firing line WILL put spectators and other shooters within the spray zone. Re-bar stands, because of their textured surface, WILL send spray in unpredictable directions.

Calamity’s Challenge

If anyone anywhere experiences "bounce back" or splatter from targets designed, supported, and placed as described in this article, please carefully record the details and forward them to me (pictures would also help). In my humble opinion, there is no reason that any Cowboy Action shooter needs to experience splatter at a match. This is a hazard we can eliminate but only through careful study and analysis. Assuming "this" or "that" is the reason someone got hit is not good enough - urban legends and suppositions wont cure the problem but science can.

We are in our second year using "Calamity’s super deluxe engineered targets and stands" and have not had a single case of a shooter being hit by spray or bullet fragments. I don’t see any reason why it shouldn’t be that way at every range!

Calamity's Splatter Report-1.pdfUnavailable

What ever happened to Diane Gleeson? We used to shoot together on occasion. She was an interesting shooter.

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Posted (edited)
10 hours ago, Allie Mo, SASS No. 25217 said:

The back leg of the tripod is planted firmly in the ground so that it is at right angles to the firing line (this ensures that the target will remain at a right angle to the firing line)

Didn't you mean to say "the target will remain parallel to the firing line"? At a right angle there wouldn't be much target profile to shoot at, and the rearward tilt of the target wouldn't accomplish very much.  

 

Another question:  Why did you select mild steel.  Most clubs are using the highest grade of AR steel that they can afford, in order to reduce target deformation and cupping.  

Edited by Dusty Devil Dale

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12 hours ago, Dusty Devil Dale said:

Didn't you mean to say "the target will remain parallel to the firing line"? At a right angle there wouldn't be much target profile to shoot at, and the rearward tilt of the target wouldn't accomplish very much.  

 

Another question:  Why did you select mild steel.  Most clubs are using the highest grade of AR steel that they can afford, in order to reduce target deformation and cupping.  

DDD,

 

I didn't write the report. Calamity Jane did. You will have to ask her any questions you addressed to "you."

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