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Your. Alias. .Your Story..Who...Why?


Jim No Horse

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Lazarus is a big fan of Robert Heinlein. Lazarus Long had a sister named Lorelei so we became Lazarus and Lorelei

Longshot. Now we have lots of Longshot relatives in SASS.

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Well, I'm a cop. I've worn body armor 5 days a week for 29 years. Its uncomfortable as heck and hot too. I'm constantly shifting and shrugging and twitching trying to get comfortable.

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Guest Tascosa Kid #90830

I grew up near the old west town of Tascosa up near Amarillo. Tascosa was taken by a member of long standing so I asked to be the Tascosa Kid. Seems there had been a lot of old outlaws thru this old west town, and a gun fight that will rival the ok corral. Old Tascosa is now a part of Cal Farley boys ranch and the original jail door is on display in the High Plains Historical museum, Canyon Tx.

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I was a medic in the Army. I was often called either Doc or Doc Ward. On the paintball / airsoft team I belong to, I'm known as Doc (we're almost all prior military) On other forums I belong to, I go by Doc Ward, because it's easy, so when I joined the SASS forum, it just seemed to make sense. Then when I actually joined...

 

I may change it someday, I have a couple of others in mind.

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When I first started shooting I had no clue as who I should be - especially with the given name of Bob. But, being 6'3" tall and then sticking a hat on top of that, I kept bumping tops of door jambs and window openings in the shooting props. Then my wife or someone said "you're too tall - Bob!" and there it was and still is "Too Tall Bob".

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Before I got into this game I wanted and got an 1860 Henry. I researched the Civil War and found the name of an owner and user of the 1860. Fergus Peel. So for a short while I was Fergus Peel. Wife, Grammie Phoenix, thought it was OK. But she has called me Sleepy Floyd for years, because she says something and I repeat it back to her sounding similar but different. So she would say quit being a sleepyFloyd. I kept that one.

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One of the fond memories of growing up in Amarillo was the Spring Rattlesnake Roundup in Palo Duro Canyon.

 

Used a jug of gasoline, funnel and 10' of garden hose to intoxicate a whole den of snakes with the fumes. They would leave their hibernation den by the dozens, and you captured them with whatever and put them a gunny sack.

 

If memory is good, we got 10 cents less per pound than t-bones sold for in the grocery store.

 

Only stopped when shooting coyotes got you a $5 bounty per critter from the ranchers.

 

Gas was $.19 to $.25 per gallon then.

 

A must do for all Pards is the High Plains Museum in Canyon and close buy is Palo Duro Canyon where Charlie Goodnight ranched after the Comanches left.

 

Just sayin'

 

AR

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The wife said I was being mean...the next day I was shooting with my son and he said I shoot a "mean gun" so that part just had a nice ring to it....the Mark part came from the character from the rifleman, which my dad and brother watched a lot when I was born. I have thought of some other good ones over the years but I guess Ill always be mean gun

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When I first started I would eat, sleep and drink cowboy.......I was told I was addicted to it.....so.....Cowboy Junky it was. Honestly not much has changed.

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Remember it well when back in 1982 was driving back and forth to the Nuke plant and bunch of us had CB Radios and we all talked back and forth to and from work and we all used a call sign.

 

Lived just off Jackrabbit Trail at the time and came up with my handle as Jackrabbit. Started into Cowboy action shooting in 1988 needing an alias there so used my CB handle Jackrabbit.

 

So there you have it;

 

Jackrabbit Joe #414

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Here' how i came up with mine. Already had the alias Rudy from car show friends. So when i joined i wanted something with Rudy. But all the ones i tried were taken. So while watching one of my favorite movies A Christmas Story! Came aka Red Rider Rudy

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My alias is based on a real person, but not from the old west. I went to college with a guy named Don Kraps. He used to tell us stories about his Black Sheep Uncle, "Roland Kraps". I always thought it was a cool pun. So when I started SASS I dropped the "d" and adopted it as my alias. It was between that and "Bat Guano".

 

Later on Gunny Sackett wrote the SASS Official History of Kraps.

 

There was a man in Toostone town, according to the Diary of Saint Muffy of the Watercress with the Crusts Cut Off, by the name of Rolan Kraps. It is said he was a large man, but not nearly so big as his heart. Dashing and bold, he made the ladies swoon, and not just with his ode’ cowboy. He did charitable works for the ladies without husbands, giving them money, asking only their company in return. He threw rocks at the children who had none. Rolan was in the vernacular of the time “Da Man”.
In his spare time he , like any proper gentleman, made whiskey. Not just any whiskey, but the best whiskey in the whole Territory, which was both vast and full of stills. This ambrosia was said to go down smooth as sodypop and kick like a spoiled mule. It was a far cry from his first recipe , which would to eat through glass. He was proud, and rightly so. Naming it after himself it was labeled The Kraps, Old No.2. It soon became the most popular libation in the Territory. Rolan, made it in great quantities to quench the powerful thirst and ease the pain of a hard life far from the comforts of ..uh..someplace…comfortable. So busy was he that he had no time to sell it by the individual bottle. You could only get it by the case. Which was fine, because that’s how everyone consumed it.
Many a cowboy was heard to say, as they road out of town with that wooden crate precariously balanced on their laps, “Man, It’s hard to ride all day when you have a case of The Kraps”. Truer words were never spoken. Though whiskey was always welcome by the fire, men shunned a man who drank in the saddle. These fellows would drink bottle after bottle, throwing the empties far behind them. They could hit another rider, or worse spook the herd. “You don’t want to ride behind Lefty today, he’s got a case of The Kraps”. Since it was best served chilled, it was often lain in a creek to keep it cold. Valuable as it was, a man had to guard it. “ Where’s Bucky”, “He’s down at the creek, probably be there all day, he has a case of The Kraps, you know”. The sturdy cases were right handy themselves as they were a good size to make doors and shutters from. All over the territory women told their husbands “ Now maybe you will make a door for the outhouse once you’re done with that case of The Kraps. By the individual bottle, it was just called Krap.
The measure of a man was often judged by how willing he was to share his whiskey . Up at the silver mines on Monte Carlo, unsociable types were said “Not to give a Krap”. “Don’t mind Charley, he don’t give a Krap for nobody”. On particularly despicable old coot would spit in the whiskey and then offer you a drink. Newcomers where advised, ”Don’t take no Krap off of that guy”.
In the far flung ranches past Toostone, where money was of little value as there was nothing to buy, men were often paid in whiskey. This was fine with the cowboys, because they would just blow a good bit of their wages on whiskey anyway. Most folks began to use it a money. It was once heard along the trail “I need a job, how’s the pay at the Double X?” “The boss works you like a dog, and the wages are Krap” “Where do I sign on?” That is all but the Dove ranch of course. Old man Dove was a temperate and God fearing man, though most folk still liked him anyway. He did not abide whiskey and it was often said that he didn’t pay Krap. While some businesses recognized it as a currency, others would not. You could see the sign in their window “We don’t take no Krap”. Forcing cowboys to take their business elsewhere. Christmas time at the ranches, the cowboys would exchange bottles. Each man would unwrap his present and yell “Oh Krap”,or “Would you look at this Krap?” The Church in Toostone used it in place of communion wine, where it was known as Holy Krap.
For a short time demand outstripped supply, and men turned to thievery. After a wave of vigilantism with shootings, and lynches it became far too dangerous to go take a Krap. However, abuse was not uncommon. I once rode to the Double Circle Rocking Consonants Ranch, home of the sorest cattle rumps in known world when we had a stampede over to the Lazy SOB. I called to the foreman, “Hey John, I need some men to help me round up some strays” “ No can do, Gunny, the boys are all full of Krap, and they ain’t moving too good this morning.” In fact a famous gunfight was called on account of whiskey. One man said to the other “ I ain’t a gonna fight you today , Doc, I was up all night with a case of The Kraps, and I can’t feel my legs. I ain’t in no shape to gunfight”. That man later became the Governor of the Territory, and then the State. So I guess you could say it the course of history has been in part shaped by The Kraps.

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Once more Rolan K...I missed some of that the first time :)....Jim

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I was sent to Germany as a 2nd Lt in 1962.

My first assignment was as an artillery safety officer. Easily known as the best way to ruin a career.

I spent 2 weeks responding to the call sign of NozzleRag 15. It stuck with me.

Alias form-NozzleRag was on the top of the list.

Got real tired of correcting and explaining so I called the office and asked if I could shorten it.

I be Noz.

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The first stage I ever shot when I started playin' this game the TO asked if the shooter was ready? I said ya' and he gave me a "beep". I proceeded to empty my guns at the targets in front of me and when I finished a couple of the spotters was yellin' "he shot six out of his pistols"! I said " ya' they're six shooters aren't they"? They said ya' but you were only supposed to load five. I said nobody told me! Someone asked, who do you think you are? Six Shot? I said I guess I am now. I went home afterward and registered it with SASS. Yes, I got a penalty!

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The first stage I ever shot when I started playin' this game the TO asked if the shooter was ready? I said ya' and he gave me a "beep". I proceeed to empty my guns at the targets in front of me and when I finished a couple of the spotters was yellin' "he shot six out of his pistols"! I said " ya' they're six shooters aren't they"? They said ya' but you were only supposed to load five. I said nobody told me! Someone asked, who do you think you are? Six Shot? I said I guess I am now. I went home afterward and registered it with SASYes, I got a 10 second penalty!

You got a break. The following is from the ROI under SDQ. "Holstering or staging a revolver with the hammer down on a live round." If you loaded six you earned a SDQ.

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I have been a carpenter and Horseshoer for around 25 years, and Shoer is the cleanest name I have been called in all those years plus I like it

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Had been thinking about a personna for SASS. I was sitting in the Midnight Star Resturant/Casino in Deadwood SD. On the wall above my table was the complete outfit (guns & all) from the movie Open Range. Since this was one of my favorite movies I was talking with a friend about it telling them about the scene right before the gun fight, as they had not seen the movie. We heard someone say it was one of their most favorite roles. We looked up and the owner Kevin Costner was standing there smiling at us. He spoke to us about the movie for a few minutes before leaving. As we finished our meal our server came to the table and told us it was on the house then gave us both a Golden Midnight Star token for the casino. Later that evening I made my decision. By the way I have since received autographed character photos of him and Mr. Duvall from the movie.

 

Charlie T Waite

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My buddy Half Fast Rusty came up with my alias, he thought it was fitting seeing that I'm a plumbing contractor.

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As a small child, accompanied Mom and her friend to movies a lot. Enjoyed a burger and 'fountain drink' at the soda

fountain at Olberg's Drug Store afterward.

One particular day we saw"Bad Bascomb" with Wallace Beery and Marjorie Main (Ma Kettle for those who may recall...).

Beery's character was a first class scoundrel, and reportedly I would run around the house shooting my capgun and yelling

"Bad Bascomb! Bad Bascomb!" Mom's friend never let me forget--- even as I grew older she'd ask "Did you get Bad

Bascomb?"

So when SASS came along, that was a natural. And since I'm Bad, it seemed reasonable for my wife to be Goode (olde

English spelling). Our oldest son, who seldom gets a chance to shoot due to work, is, naturally enough, Uhglee

Bascomb.....

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You got a break. The following is from the ROI under SDQ. "Holstering or staging a revolver with the hammer down on a live round." If you loaded six you earned a SDQ.

Maybe it was a SDQ. It shoulda' been if it wasn't.

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....so now, in the middle of a hurricane here's the story of my alias.....

Doc Silverfinger was a mythical dentist, as I am in real life, who represents a person who knows he's right about something, but is castigated by his peers for his

beliefs and later is vindicated when he is proven to be "right-on.....................

 

Doc was born in Kentucky in 1821. He graduated from the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery (1st dental school in the U.S.) in 1843. He promptly set up a travelling

dental practice in two oversized covered wagons throughout the Kansas, Colorado, and Arizona territories.

About 10 years before this, what we now know as "Dental Amalgam" was introduced into this country by two French brothers named Crawcour. These brothers were really

hucksters and "quacks" as they promoted the product in what today would be described as a "medicine show", giving it names such as "silver paste" and "Royal Mineral

Succedaneum". Moreover, the material as well as its handling procedures (people inserted the material with their fingers) were not standardized, all sorts of failings

resulted from its (mis)use - so much so, that the true dental authorities of the day decried its use and said that they would have nothing to do with "THOSE SILVER-

FINGERED DENTISTS".

Doc however saw great promise in this new substance, and found that when the ingredients were standardized, correctly mixed and handled, and inserted into a tooth that had been properly prepared, with a set of instruments that he had rudimentally fashioned, the material showed great promise. For the most part, until his later years, he

kept his knowledge a secret, lest he be chastised and banned from the professional dental associations of the time.

During the Civil War, he served the South as a Surgeon - amputating limbs that could not be saved, fixing teeth that could be fixed, and extracting those that could not.

After the war, while continuing to practice, he made the acquaintance of another dentist named Greene Vardiman Black (G.V. Black) and shared his knowledge of the use of

amalgam. Dr. Black further refined Doc Silverfinger's technique, demonstrating it to the authorities around 1900.

Doc Silverfinger died in 1903. G.V. Black went on to win acclaim as the father of modern operative dentistry.

................and that's my story folks............................

FWIW, Doc

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I had a long list of Alias when I called SASS...this is the one on the

list she couldn't find.

My wife says I should change it to Diablo Gordo...since I have gained a few LBS.

Her Alias Is Sally Skull...a real person in history who allegedly Killed all 3 of her husbands.

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....so now, in the middle of a hurricane here's the story of my alias.....

Doc Silverfinger was a mythical dentist, as I am in real life, who represents a person who knows he's right about something, but is castigated by his peers for his

beliefs and later is vindicated when he is proven to be "right-on.....................

 

Doc was born in Kentucky in 1821. He graduated from the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery (1st dental school in the U.S.) in 1843. He promptly set up a travelling

dental practice in two oversized covered wagons throughout the Kansas, Colorado, and Arizona territories.

About 10 years before this, what we now know as "Dental Amalgam" was introduced into this country by two French brothers named Crawcour. These brothers were really

hucksters and "quacks" as they promoted the product in what today would be described as a "medicine show", giving it names such as "silver paste" and "Royal Mineral

Succedaneum". Moreover, the material as well as its handling procedures (people inserted the material with their fingers) were not standardized, all sorts of failings

resulted from its (mis)use - so much so, that the true dental authorities of the day decried its use and said that they would have nothing to do with "THOSE SILVER-

FINGERED DENTISTS".

Doc however saw great promise in this new substance, and found that when the ingredients were standardized, correctly mixed and handled, and inserted into a tooth that had been properly prepared, with a set of instruments that he had rudimentally fashioned, the material showed great promise. For the most part, until his later years, he

kept his knowledge a secret, lest he be chastised and banned from the professional dental associations of the time.

During the Civil War, he served the South as a Surgeon - amputating limbs that could not be saved, fixing teeth that could be fixed, and extracting those that could not.

After the war, while continuing to practice, he made the acquaintance of another dentist named Greene Vardiman Black (G.V. Black) and shared his knowledge of the use of

amalgam. Dr. Black further refined Doc Silverfinger's technique, demonstrating it to the authorities around 1900.

Doc Silverfinger died in 1903. G.V. Black went on to win acclaim as the father of modern operative dentistry.

................and that's my story folks............................

FWIW, Doc

 

verrrrrrrrrrry interesting Doc. I thought it was just because dentists charge a lot of money. LOL!!! Are you shootin' with the Harvard Ghost Riders Sunday?

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Pulp: 1. the stuff in certain cactus plants that kept Hollywood cowboys alive in the desert; 2. the type of paper dime novels were written on; 3. what I would be beaten into if I ever got into a bar fight.

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Interesting topic. I'll contribute too.

My Grandpa would tell me stories of his uncle Henry out west in the Cavalry, fighting Indians and riding a scout with William Cody. Having been in the Cavalry my ownself, a military alias seemed approprete.

Called SASS for "Cpl. Henry" and lady told me they had too many Henrys already. So as my usual thought, guess I was just born too late. Hence "Cpl. Henry B.(for born) Tolate". She said that'll work.

Have since been allowed to change to just "Cpl. Henry", but the "Tolate" still sticks.

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Pretty simple:

Bones - I'm an x-ray tech and trekkie. Been in medicine for 30 years - Navy Hospital Corpsman, EMT, Combat Medic, Medical evac coordinator, X-ray tech, Hospital administrator, NBC trained, etc.

Zook - My last name, A nod to my grandfather, who moved from PA to KS in 1900 or so.

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My last name is Flanagan so I wanted something Irish for an alias. I had always used the name Seamus to torment and tease my new daughter in law. I told her that their first child would have to have a good Irish name like Seamus. If she had twins they had to be Seamus and Angus. I got a lot of mileage out of that for a while. At the time I joined SASS, my daughter and daughter in law had just finished had just finished a 5K race. We were sitting at a restaurant and talking about an alias. My daughter suggested Seamus. I figured that was a natural and added Sixgun in front because it kinda flowed. BTW - that grandson was born this week without the name of Seamus. I posted about him earlier this week. Maybe in a few years he can be Little Seamus when he starts to shoot Buckaroo.

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The Diamond part of my Alias is that my birthday is April. The Curly was in honor of my sixth grade teacher who saw me taking to the streets with bad company and took the time to take me under is guidance and keep me off of the streets and back into the classroom. I wore a flat top at the time thus the name Curly was attached to me by him. Mr Spurza from Gloversville NY took the time and effort to keep a young kid like me out of trouble with the law and I could not think of a better way to remember him than to attach his nick name to me as my alias in CAS. If it were not for him I doubt I would have qualified to even own a firearm what with hanging out with some of the kids that I was at the young age of twelve. I was fortunate to spend some time with him over the years on my visits back to NY to share with him how I felt with what he did to turn my life around in a positive manner. He passed this summer at the age of 91 and I am sure many other kids also looked up to him the same way that I have over the years.

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My other hobby is gardening and canning. I've won the canned salsa contest at the Iowa State Fair twice. Most shoots that I go to I bring chips and salsa for afterward.

 

Yeah but never enough!

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....so now, in the middle of a hurricane here's the story of my alias.....

Doc Silverfinger was a mythical dentist, as I am in real life, ....

.

................and that's my story folks............................

FWIW, Doc

 

I was just glad to read that you aren't a proctologist. :D

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