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I Know, Early For Thanksgiving, But What Makes It For Your Meal


Subdeacon Joe

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Around this time of year I start thinking about what we will do for Thanksgiving Dinner.  Just the two of us, so the elaborate meals and plans usually go by the wayside.  Even so, it is fun to think about it.

For us it is all the sides that "make" the meal.  The dressing/stuffing, sweet potatoes. Yeah, we have them the rest of the year, too, but somehow they are a Thanksgiving Day must have.

The dressing is the usual, cornbread, stale bread, butter, onions, celery, poultry seasoning, black pepper, and chicken or vegetable stock.
Sweet potatoes, scrub 'em, pierce them, line a baking dish with foil and spray the foil with cooking spray, put the sweets into the pan, and bake until soft.  Split 'em open, add butter, salt, and pepper.  Or have for dessert with butter, a touch of salt, and either brown sugar or a little maple syrup.

Green beans cooked with onions and bacon.

There may or may not be turkey.  In fact, lately we have been cooking the turkey the next day.  Or cooking a turkey breast and using it for the "leftover turkey sandwich."

 

 

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18 minutes ago, Subdeacon Joe said:

Around this time of year I start thinking about what we will do for Thanksgiving Dinner.  Just the two of us, so the elaborate meals and plans usually go by the wayside.  Even so, it is fun to think about it.

For us it is all the sides that "make" the meal.  The
dressing/stuffing, sweet potatoes. Yeah, we have them the rest of the year, too, but somehow they are a Thanksgiving Day must have.

The dressing is the usual, ,
stale cornbreadbread, butter, onions, celery, poultry seasoning, black pepper, and chicken or vegetable stock.
Sweet potatoes, scrub 'em, pierce them, line a baking dish with foil and spray the foil with cooking spray, put the sweets into the pan, and bake until soft.  Split 'em open, add butter, salt, and pepper.  Or have for dessert with butter, a touch of salt, and either brown sugar or a little maple syrup.

Green beans cooked with onions and bacon.

There may or may not be
turkey.  In fact, lately we have been cooking the turkey the next day.  Or cooking a turkey breast and using it for the "leftover turkey sandwich."

 

 

Looking good Joe.

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We will be having dinner with another pair of couples who don't have family in the area.  One of the gents is on a gluten free diet so I will make some GF bread and use some of it to make stuffing with.  I'm planning on smoking a turkey this year and bringing it as well. 

 

For us, it's not the food but the company that makes it.  While I'm a traditionalist regarding the menu, we could eat meatloaf and mashed potatoes and I would be good with it.  It's all about enjoying the company of those we are with.  We will spend some time with our families later this year so we want to enjoy this time with our friends.

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The years have gone where the wife and me would have all the neighbors, her mom, my mom for the feast. Even some of the neighbors family would come. All gone except the memories. Like last year lucky for the K of C having dinner for the lonely. I'll be there by myself once again. But, what the heck, will be the last one thank goodness for that. But I'm happy and so thankful for the memories.

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For me all I really need is turkey, stuffing., mashed potatoes and gravy. The stuffing is the biggest hit or miss variable. One year at my sister in laws, we sit down for dinner and the stuffing was as if it had been run through a blender. Like a thick gruel almost a paste. What a disappointment! 

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29 minutes ago, Smokin Gator SASS #29736 said:

For me all I really need is turkey, stuffing., mashed potatoes and gravy. The stuffing is the biggest hit or miss variable. One year at my sister in laws, we sit down for dinner and the stuffing was as if it had been run through a blender. Like a thick gruel almost a paste. What a disappointment! 

 

Exactement! We never add liquid of any kind (not counting melted butter), including broth, to stuffing. The bird itself provides enough moisture. Overly dense or gruel-like stuffing is thereby avoided.

 

With just us, our kids and their spouses, and our grandkids and their spouses, we add up to 25. Most of them will be at the table. A few will be at their in-laws so they can be ours at Christmas!

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Might be just the two of us this year. Haven't thought about menu yet, but am leaning towards a turkey breast, real mashed taters( not flakes), Stove Top Stuffing as the amount is just about right for the two of us, and pie/pies of some sort. Not sure about veggies yet. Might depend on the wife's appetite as sometimes it isn't very big...........:blush:

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54 minutes ago, Badger Mountain Charlie SASS #43172 said:

WAIT A COTTON PICKING MINUTE HERE. 

 

WE FORGOT THE PUMPKIN PIE!

 

 

I knew I had left something out!  Three pies - Shoo Fly Pie, Mince Meat Pie, and Pumpkin Pie.  If one is left out it will be the Pumpkin Pie.

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1 hour ago, Badger Mountain Charlie SASS #43172 said:

WAIT A COTTON PICKING MINUTE HERE. 

 

WE FORGOT THE PUMPKIN PIE!

I've been trying to forget pumpkin pie for about 70 years.

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Left over turkey breast on Artisan white bread and left over gravy.  Side it with a half cup or more of mashed potatoes and butter and an equal size serving of real cranberry sauce.....and more gravy, thick enough to sculpt.  I get Jonesing for that about once a quarter.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Cranberry salad (Mama's recipe) and pecan pie.  The cranberry salad is for me.  I'm not sure I'd be let in without a pecan pie.

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17 minutes ago, Texas Lizard said:

Read somewhere there might a shortage of turkeys this year and cranberry......

 

Texas Lizard

Now you are starting rumors and gossip, Lizard. :lol:

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Just now, MizPete said:

Cranberry salad (Mama's recipe) and pecan pie.  The cranberry salad is for me.  I'm not sure I'd be let in without a pecan pie.

Well, I should hope not. :)

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Beside the usual turkey, we tend to have a green bean casserole which I can’t stand.  I eat it because of tradition because it is served out of tradition.  We have no children, which means my niece makes and shares it.  I blame my sister in law.

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I usually stuff a boneless Turkey breast with a corn bread,sage sausage, minced apple,dried cranberry and pecan stuffing. Candied sweet potatoes and pecan pie.Anything else is unimportant.

(And I agree with 40Rod.Not a fan of pumpkin pie)

Choctaw Jack 

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18 minutes ago, South-Eye Ned said:

Beside the usual turkey, we tend to have a green bean casserole which I can’t stand.  I eat it because of tradition because it is served out of tradition.  We have no children, which means my niece makes and shares it.  I blame my sister in law.

I can't take it either. Who dreamed that up? Certainly not the indigenous people. 

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1 hour ago, Badger Mountain Charlie SASS #43172 said:

I can't take it either. Who dreamed that up? Certainly not the indigenous people. 


It was invented by a woman named Dorcas Reilly in 1955.  She was a supervisor in the Home Economics Department of Campbells test kitchen in Camden, NJ.

 

Quote

 she was tasked with creating a recipe for a feature that would appear in the Associated Press. The recipe had to be based on ingredients that any home cook would have on hand, including Campbell’s mushroom soup and green beans.

 

Dorcas, who had earned a degree in home economics from Drexel University (known then as the Drexel Institute of Technology), got to tinkering. According to Today’s Vidya Rao, she and her team initially toyed with adding celery salt and ham to the recipe, but ultimately settled on six simple, affordable ingredients that could be stirred together in a casserole dish and popped into the oven for 25 minutes. The prep time was minimal; the dish worked well with frozen or canned green beans, and the fried onions were pre-packaged.

It was the perfect recipe for post-War America, when cheap, fuss-free cooking was all the rage. The lifting of wartime rations on canned goods, coupled with innovations in canning and freezing that made packaged foods more accessible than ever, created a culture of convenience cooking. Though they continued to shoulder the responsibility of keeping the family fed, an ever-growing number of women were entering the workforce, fueling the demand for easy-to-make meals.

Originally called “Green Bean Bake,” Dorcas’ dish really took off when Campbell’s began printing the recipe on its mushroom soup cans, according to Karen Zraick of the New York Times. Dorcas had created many recipes for the company (among them tuna noodle casserole and Sloppy Joe’s made from tomato soup), and was somewhat surprised that the green bean casserole proved to be such a hit.

“We all thought this is very nice, etc., and then when we got the feelings of the consumer, we were really kinda pleasantly shocked,” Reilly once said, according to Today’s Rao. “I’m very proud of this, and I was shocked when I realized how popular it had become.”

 

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6 minutes ago, Subdeacon Joe said:


It was invented by a woman named Dorcas Reilly in 1955.  She was a supervisor in the Home Economics Department of Campbells test kitchen in Camden, NJ.

 

 

Campbells  should have stayed with Tomato Soup and Chicken Noodle Soup. 

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This year my mom will be living at the end of my long driveway so I imagine it will include a bigger turkey.  Each year I tinker with putting butter or bacon or fat back under the skin but this year I will put butter under the skin and olive oil around the outside with pats of butter and possibly honey on the outside.   

 

Then dressing , half without onions for us normal folks who don't like onions , green beans, cranberry sauce, hopefully with fresh cranberries,  maybe some brown sugar carrots or broccoli casserole.   

 

Pumpkin pie and sweet potatoes sufle,  with pecans on top, 

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No Thanksgiving turkey dinner is complete without real giblet gravy. I don't mean sorta giblet gravy, I mean the real thing with heart, liver, giblets and neck meat. Seems that no one in my family makes it but me, yet everyone loves it. My Great Grandmother made it the best but she's long gone. I try my best, it's close but not the same.

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31 minutes ago, Cypress Sun said:

No Thanksgiving turkey dinner is complete without real giblet gravy. I don't mean sorta giblet gravy, I mean the real thing with heart, liver, giblets and neck meat. Seems that no one in my family makes it but me, yet everyone loves it. My Great Grandmother made it the best but she's long gone. I try my best, it's close but not the same.

How do you make it?  I make plain gravy.

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Mama made giblet gravy but I don't eat innards.  Tough to pick out the bits from the gravy with everybody waiting for you to pass it.

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7 hours ago, Trigger Mike said:

This year my mom will be living at the end of my long driveway so.....

You’ll have to be more careful backing out of the garage from now on.

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I always seem to find these threads a day late and a dollar short! :) 

We started cooking two turkey breasts for the three of us a few years back. We don't really care for dark meat and we all LOVE turkey sammiches made with real mayo, white bread, stuffing, turkey and cranberry sauce.

Stuffing is Pepperidge Farm mix made with onions, celery, mushrooms, black olives, chicken broth and lots of butter.

Sweet potato casserole topped with pecans and mini marshmallows 

Mustard greens with bacon, red onion and balsamic vinegar

And Mince Pie for dessert!!

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I just had breakfast and reading this thread has me hungry again!

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22 minutes ago, Seamus McGillicuddy said:


Bird flu?????? :)

 

Seamus

No, Coronavirus. Multiple plant shutdowns worldwide. Not the birds, they are fine since 2015. It is the employees. Mainly US and Brazil. But in the case of turkeys, the US will notice this (because of the holiday). I'll be buying a frozen minimally-processed turkey soon. Like maybe tomorrow.

 

Those who like Butterballs will run into the shortage so I will get my "real" (tough if not cooked just right, needs traditional handling and preparation, pain in the a** turkey, true flavor) turkey before everyone else runs out of Butterballs and buys one of the only available "real" (minimally processed not injected pre-tenderized) turkeys at the already normally ridiculously high price. If you do get one of the "real" turkeys, ask or google or duck duck go before cooking or you will get a bird that sucks for dinner.

 

But the shortage will not be that bad, these turkeys have been getting prepared (by employees) for months, it is only a portion of production that would come in the next few weeks that will be impacted. The ones prepped and frozen months ago will still be delivered to stores. There just won't be as many as usual.

 

Please, don't buy extra for next year, they won't last that long in the freezer. Turkeys are not like toilet paper or ammo. But when the Butterballs get bought out, it may require paying more for a traditional turkey and putting some effort into learning how out great-grandparents cooked them. Or just chew harder.

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