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Shotgun Butt Crack


Buckshot Bear
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The stock needs to be relieved and fitted to the Stoeger frame and tangs.  The crack needs filled with epoxy and the whole shebang bedded with Acraglass.  The wood above the crack is going to splinter off. 

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7 minutes ago, Colorado Coffinmaker said:

The stock needs to be relieved and fitted to the Stoeger frame and tangs.  The crack needs filled with epoxy and the whole shebang bedded with Acraglass.  The wood above the crack is going to splinter off. 

 

 

I'm thinking it likely to eventually splinter off as well.

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I agree. This isn’t the first Stoger that wasn’t inletted enough. This allows the recoil forces to hit there, instead of inside on the anchor lug. Relieve the inletting and get those forces moved back inside where they belong. Once that is done and the stock is bedded into the anchor lug, glue and pin the cracked area. Should last a long time. 
 

Sam Sackett 

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Short grain on the stock there, too.  Wood's gonna be wood.  

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Thanks fella's I was thinking of drilling two long holes and turning down some walnut that I have and making walnut dowel to the diameter of the smallish drilled holes and dowelling and glueing.

 

I have to admit that my knowledge of you guys saying "it needs inletting and bedding" is over my knowledge threshold of even understanding what you mean as to what needs to be done.

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The problem is as much the short grain in the stock at that point. In other words, the grain angle is diagonal across the stock rather than parallel with the stock. Short grain is fragile by comparison to long grain (parallel to the stock).  There could also be a crack in the wood from the mfg or milling process. May be tough to fix that, but reinforcing the stock with dowel stock is not a bad idea.  

 

Inletting and relieving the stock involves removing stock so that the recoil forces are resisted by a solid facing on the stock, in a direction parallel to the stock. I'm not sure that's possible when the grain is running off like it is at the stock's wrist. 

 

I'd give the reinforcing a try, but be prepared to replace the stock. If it were Ruger or other reputable mfg, you might get some relief from them, but it's a Stoeger. Que Sera Sera. 

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14 minutes ago, Ripsaw said:

 

 

I'd give the reinforcing a try, but be prepared to replace the stock. If it were Ruger or other reputable mfg, you might get some relief from them, but it's a Stoeger. Que Sera Sera. 

 

I bought it mail order from another State, I can imagine that a warranty claim would be a right royal pain in the behind + I've slicked it up so that would be an 'out' for them (pretty sure that Beretta Australia is the importer here in Oz).

 

I was thinking of drilling and dowelling from the bottom?

 

20210917_151833.thumb.jpg.1fdc6f80697925115092ca8c51d19989.jpg

Edited by Buckshot Bear
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14 minutes ago, Buckshot Bear said:

 

I bought it mail order from another State, I can imagine that a warranty claim would be a right royal pain in the behind + I've slicked it up so that would be an 'out' for them (pretty sure that Beretta Australia is the importer here in Oz).

 

I was thinking of drilling and dowelling from the bottom?

 

20210917_151833.thumb.jpg.1fdc6f80697925115092ca8c51d19989.jpg

 

 

But that won't solve the problem of the fit. If you aren't comfortable with the inletting, you can simply use a piece of old credit card plastic to make a spacer to go between the tang and the stock. Cut it the size of the tang and drill a hole for the bolt. It may leave a space between the metal and wood, but that's better than splitting your newly repaired stock. BTW, I do this on every Stoeger I buy BEFORE they split.

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2 minutes ago, Rattlesnake Slim said:

 

 

But that won't solve the problem of the fit. If you aren't comfortable with the inletting, you can simply use a piece of old credit card plastic to make a spacer to go between the tang and the stock. Cut it the size of the tang and drill a hole for the bolt. It may leave a space between the metal and wood, but that's better than splitting your newly repaired stock. BTW, I do this on every Stoeger I buy BEFORE they split.

 

Its Sunday morning here, not sure if I had a hard Saturday night or I'm just thick (didn't have a hard Saturday night so that must mean the later :( ) but I really don't follow what inletting the stock at the union between the wood and the steel actually means?

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The stock is splitting because the receiver is hitting the stock near the crack with every shot. You need to create some space. You can either inlet the stock near the receiver (and everywhere else it is touching) or add a spacer at the back where the tang touches the stock.

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9 minutes ago, Rattlesnake Slim said:

The stock is splitting because the receiver is hitting the stock near the crack with every shot. You need to create some space. You can either inlet the stock near the receiver (and everywhere else it is touching) or add a spacer at the back where the tang touches the stock.

 

Do you mean relieve the wood where I've marked green?

 

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Edited by Buckshot Bear
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Inletting means creating more space between the stock and receiver where the contact pressure is uneven. Kinda like when a dentist removes material after filling your tooth. Too much filling, the tooth above/below the new filling makes contact putting uneven pressure on it. If left uncorrected, the tooth can fracture. 

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I don't know how helpful this may be, but in a "pinch," the wise folks at Duluth Trading may provide "Derriere Repair."  Might could be helpful ???  In light of the OP title perhaps ??  Maybe ??

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27 minutes ago, Marshal TKD, Sass # 36984L said:

This thread could have went all kinds of sideways, Sadly it did not.

"Day ain't over yet"  Curly- City Slickers

 

Imis

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If I remember coreectly the stock in that area is pretty thin and you might do more damage by trying to drill it and use a dowel or screw.  Fill and bond is the way to go. There are some videos on the Midway website that show crack repair.  Here is a short clip from one.

 

 

Edited by Larsen E. Pettifogger, SASS #32933
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  • 2 weeks later...

Between some of Midway USA videos and some of Anvils videos, I've fixed some pretty ugly ones. 

 

Plan out your work first, your first kick at the cat is your best opportunity for success. The 97 in the pictures has dowels, arsenal pins, glue and epoxy. The shotgun was pretty much garbage to begin with, it took lots of work and parts.

 

That poor forend was in 4 pieces, at the time I could not find a three screw forend for sale. 

 

I'm no craftsman, and the pictures are just to illustrate what can be done if you think things out and take your time. 

 

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If you end up pinning it, use some brass machine screws. The threads will hold better than a dowel. Should also be bedded.

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