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J Bar Binks, #47015

The story of the Rossi 1892, as best I can tell...

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Some interesting stuff I came across and compiled about Rossi/LSI 1892's -

Rossi made the Model 92 for Navy Arms, EMF, and Interarms. There are some qualitative differences in them based on the level of finish, walnut stock, etc, requested by the re-seller. Legacy Sports (LSI) is one of the successor companies to Interarms and prior to January 1, 2009 Amadeo Rossi made the Puma rifle under contract with LSI after Interarms closed up shop in the mid 1990's. Then, a few years ago, Taurus became involved with Amadeo Rossi and formed the Braztech Corporation to become the exclusive importer of Rossi 1892 rifles. When that happened, the contract to supply the Puma rifle to LSI was terminated. LSI then contracted Armi-Sport / Chiappa of Italy to manufacture a Model 92 clone under the same Puma name for them and the current LSI Puma rifle is made by Armi-Sport / Chiappa in Italy. Consequently, since January 1, 2009, all "Puma" Model 92s have been manufactured by Armi-Sport / Chiappa, although you may still encounter a Braztech Rossi Model 92 in a Puma box - which adds to the general confusion. All of the Armi-Sport / Chiappa made rifles and carbines made for LSI are marked "manufactured by Chiappa Firearms for LSI". They will normally (but not always) have a prefix of "T" for their serial numbers. If a "Puma" 1892 does not have these features, it was probably a model manufactured by Rossi prior to January 1, 2009. This has generated a fair amount of confusion as in the space of a couple of years the same Puma 92 rifles and carbines have been re-sold by LSI, but made by 2 different manufacturers (Rossi and Armi Sport / Chiappa). The Armi-Sport/Chiappa version of the Puma rifle is considerably more expensive than the Rossi version of the Puma was, but the quality is excellent in terms of smooth function and a nice finish. They also do not have the pigtail safety on the bolt. The bad news is that the prices seem to start at around $800. Rossi also still makes the Model 92 and they are usually Braztech marked, and/or marked "Made in Brazil".

So, it would appear that an 1892 coming from Taurus/Braztech today is the exact same Rossi made in the same factory as prior '92's imported from Brazil by LSI and Interarms, except earlier models didn't have the goofy safety on top of the bolt. I don't know just when the safety was introduced, but I bought a Puma in 2001 that was equipped with one. If you know how to get one back together after smoothing the insides up and reducing the ejector spring pressure, they're really not a bad entry level rifle for the average shooter, and can still occasionally be found for under $400 NIB.

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I like the 92, but I am being told that it will never be as fast or smooth as a 73. Hence, I am told, I will grow out of it quickly. What do you think?

Certainly, it is less than half the price of a new or even used and slicked 73. I have seen some video footage and it seems Kiowa Jones is the man for that weapon. He seems very convincing in his statements that a 92 can be made as smooth as a 73.

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Like most shooters, I'll never be fast enough to outrun a '92. I don't enjoy the competitive aspect of CAS nearly as much as I do shooting all the different guns that were available from the time period. Marlins, '66's, and '73's are what I shoot most often, but 92's, and others, get their chance too. :) You can't go wrong with Steve Young, aka Nate Kiowa Jones, to make a '92 sing. My daughter was the top overall woman shooter at last year's two day Montana Territorial shoot using a very slick Rossi .357 SRC.

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I shoot 92 Rossi, '66 & '73 with home made action jobs & short stroke when available in various calibers.

A Puma 92 Rossi can be made as smooth as a '66 or '73 (there are on the market good DVDs explaining how to disassemble the gun & make a good action job with lighter springs ), but...it will never be as fast as a Winch clone because there is no short stroke available.

On the other hand, reloading on shell from the top is easier.

I really love the small 92, gorgeously designed by Browning & technically much better than a '66 or '73, but if you try to shoot fast either you don't push ahead the lever enough => no ammo in the chamber..., or you pull your fingers out of the lever... I least, that's what I do! Shame on me...

There is a solution ( but my gunsmith skills are not high enough) : increase the thickness of the carrier in order to have an earlier lever contact at the same time as the cocking...

Hope my French is good enough...

Congratulations to the cowboy who will succeed it!

Jef

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Some interesting stuff I came across and compiled about Rossi/LSI 1892's -

 

<SNIP>

So, it would appear that an 1892 coming from Taurus/Braztech today is the exact same Rossi made in the same factory as prior '92's imported from Brazil by LSI and Interarms, except earlier models didn't have the goofy safety on top of the bolt. I don't know just when the safety was introduced, but I bought a Puma in 2001 that was equipped with one. If you know how to get one back together after smoothing the insides up and reducing the ejector spring pressure, they're really not a bad entry level rifle for the average shooter, and can still occasionally be found for under $400 NIB.

On this site you will hear a lot of arguments for getting the 'rifle you'll end up with', instead of buying a 92. Typically it's a toggle bolt 73 or maybe a '66, occasionally a Marlin. That logic is probably sound if you're going to be a competitive shooter who is willing to invest a lot of money and time in getting good in this game. If you are a shooter who has a budget that won't go there, or if you want a rifle that will do double duty for hunting, the '92 is a very sound choice.

 

The '92 was a top contender back in the day, and there are shooters who can make music with it. Nate Kiowa Jones (Steve Young) is a master gunsmith with this rifle, he's done two for me so far. Would I like a Henry? Yes, I would, for style points. A '73 - not so much - the gun doesn't appeal to me, and I'm really not going to buy equipment like that until I'm feeling the need for more speed. One can shoot a very good match using this rifle, and if you need to trade up there are almost always other new shooters on a budget that will buy it to get started, giving you back a good portion of your money to upgrade. Or you can leave it in the vault as a back up gun, it is less likely to break than many other rifles.

 

I like the 92, I've got a stainless carbine, and a blue octagonal 24" rifle. They're both fun to shoot, the carbine is an easy carrying woods rifle, and in SS is fine for rainy Washington.

 

YMMV,

Shadow Catcher

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I am a 92 shooter for several years now .

I love the rifle so much I have three of them.

 

Like others have said .

Its not the fastest rifle in the game .

 

With that said .

Most shooters can NOT out run the rifle .

 

Great Inexpensive rifle to start with .

You might never need a 1000 Rifle (66 or 73 ).

 

If you can afford to buy the best .

Then by all means do so .

 

If you can not or dont want to spend that kind of cash to play the game.

You dont have too.

 

Good luck with what ever you decide to shoot.

The main thing is to have fun and shoot safe !

 

God bless.

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On this site you will hear a lot of arguments for getting the 'rifle you'll end up with', instead of buying a 92. Typically it's a toggle bolt 73 or maybe a '66, occasionally a Marlin. That logic is probably sound if you're going to be a competitive shooter who is willing to invest a lot of money and time in getting good in this game. If you are a shooter who has a budget that won't go there, or if you want a rifle that will do double duty for hunting, the '92 is a very sound choice.

 

The '92 was a top contender back in the day, and there are shooters who can make music with it. Nate Kiowa Jones (Steve Young) is a master gunsmith with this rifle, he's done two for me so far. Would I like a Henry? Yes, I would, for style points. A '73 - not so much - the gun doesn't appeal to me, and I'm really not going to buy equipment like that until I'm feeling the need for more speed. One can shoot a very good match using this rifle, and if you need to trade up there are almost always other new shooters on a budget that will buy it to get started, giving you back a good portion of your money to upgrade. Or you can leave it in the vault as a back up gun, it is less likely to break than many other rifles.

 

I like the 92, I've got a stainless carbine, and a blue octagonal 24" rifle. They're both fun to shoot, the carbine is an easy carrying woods rifle, and in SS is fine for rainy Washington.

 

YMMV,

Shadow Catcher

Plus one on the above. I'm a '92 shooter as well and although it'll never be as fast a a short stroked '73, it's every bit as smooth and faster than any Marlin I've ever shot. That said, I really like the looks of the '73 but feel the '92 is quicker on target due to the weight

difference. I tried just about every thing(pistols and rifles) when I first started.....I've settled on what I like . Everyone should do the same. :)

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I also shoot a 92. Love it! Im not sure who did the action work as it was purchased used from another shooter. It is smooth. it is a lot faster than I will ever be.But does have some age on it. I just purchased my second. Brand new Puma . I will attempt to do the Nate Kiowa Jones action job that he displays in his video . I expect good results.

Crash

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I've had two Rossi '92s since I began shooting CAS (1992) and I realize that a tricked out '73 or '66 would improve my scores, I've gotten to the point to where I shoot to have fun and if I come in first then halleliua and if not, hey, I had fun doing it. I have had one tuned by Mad Dog McCracken and it sings and the other (a SS model)has had a spring kit put in (by me) and it sings even better. As long as I keep the crud out of the action they do their job flawlessly. I'll never be a top champion but enjoy being the comic relief for the posse while shooting Frontiersman. I highly recommend the Rossi '92s for those getting started in CAS for fear that the cost of fancy tricked out '73s are gonna price the new shooter out of even trying the sport. If they are pretty good shooters and want to do their best then go for it and get the faster actions. The original "gamer gun" was a Rossi '92 Short Rifle before the short stroke kits were developed for the '73s.

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I started with a 92 and still have one of them.I shoot a 73 and I am a little faster with my 73 than I am with my 92 but My 92 in the hands of I really great gunfighter is way faster than me with my 73.I may someday sale one of my 73s but I will never sale my 92.It was done by Nate and IT is as smooth as my 73s.

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I've gotten to the point to where I shoot to have fun and if I come in first then halleliua and if not, hey, I had fun doing it.

I think we all shoot to have fun, whether that's going as fast as you can, or shooting C&B's, or dressing up like a B Western hero, or shooting Spencers or being the posse joker. ;)

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J Bar,

Here is my take on Rossi history. For years dating back to before 1975 the made in Brazil Rossi 92 was imported by InterArms of Alexandria VA. Before InterArms 1975-1999, Firearms International of Washington DC imported Rossi in the 1960’s. From about 1968-74Garcia Corp. of Washington DC imported Rossi. InterArms was the first to market the Rossi made 92 as their Puma model.

About 1999 the owner of InterArms passed away. It is my understanding the heirs didn't care to continue with the operation of InterArms so the stock on hand was sold off at a reduced price. (I bought new Rossi 92's at that time for $190). About that same time period, Rossi sold off their gallery gun, the pump 62 and the revolvers to Taurus, so some folks thought there would be no more Rossi 92's available. I can't tell you how many people ask me what I was going to do now.

About this time, around 2000, Rossi completely re-tooled with all new CNC machine. This new machinery has allowed them to make some parts better fitted. There are still some that are over sprung but overall the current guns are much nicer than the pre-2000 92’s. About this same time Navy Arms had started importing the Rossi 92's. Then not long after, the ex-employee's of InterArms started up Legacy Sports International (LSI) and began importing the Rossi 92 as their Puma. These were the first to have the ugly bolt top safety. LSI was even in the same building as the old InterArms company and were using the Puma name as the model name, too. Then and I don't remember exactly, LSI moved to Reno NV.

During the mid to late 90’s, EMF was importing the Armi San Marco Italian made 92's, (ASM's) and had contracted me to do warranty work on those for them. But ASM's QC was so bad EMF ask me to help them decide how the Rossi 92's should be spec-ed for import as there EMF Hartford 92. From about 2000 to 2006 the EMF imported Rossi 92's did not have the ugly safety. From then until 2009 they did have it.

 

In 2009 Taurus finally acquired Rossi and the 92's and have taken over the distribution under the Braztech name. Both EMF and LSI lost their deal once the Taurus buyout took place. LSI now carries the Armi Sport/Chiappa 92 but it's still called the Puma Model.

 

 

Think about this. All the folks that made the original 92's are long dead and gone. The folks with the most experience building 92's now are the Rossi folks. They have been doing it for over 40 something years. They aren't finished as nice as the others but they don't cost twice as much either and Rossi knows more about making a 92 work with straight wall cartridge than the others.

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I started with a Rossi 1892 tuned at the factory (#2 of 1000, not sure that they ever did 1000) and had a local experienced 'smith slicken it up a bit more. I shot middle-of-the-pack consistently with it but it was intolerant of short OALs and occasionally stovepiped a round.

I have owned two original 1892s (a .32-20 carbine made in 1906 and a .38-40 made in 1925). Both guns are much more reliable and are faster than the Rossi (now sold). They also continue to go up in value. Originals in shooter condition can be found for $1000 or less.

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I have a Rossi/Hartford 92 in stainless steel in a .45 Colt. Sent it to NKJ and he worked his magic on it and took out the ridiculous safety that kept flipping to ON. I tried to use it in a Wild Bunch Match but got so frustrated with it I shot the rest of the match with a borrowed 73.

I love the Rossi 92 as it is a handy little rifle and pretty smooth action but I cant use it for matches anymore. I will never sell it because it is still a fun little rifle....I would love to have a real Winchester 92 with the original bottleneck cartridges that it was designed for and bet it would be smoother but still not as fast as my 73s or Marlins

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I started with a Rossi 1892 tuned at the factory (#2 of 1000, not sure that they ever did 1000) and had a local experienced 'smith slicken it up a bit more. I shot middle-of-the-pack consistently with it but it was intolerant of short OALs and occasionally stovepiped a round.

 

Those were not tuned. They were Rossi's first ever stainless gun imported in the late 90's by Interarms. They did a 2nd run marked #? of 2000. Eventually they continued with the stainless guns just with regulat serial #'s.

I have owned two original 1892s (a .32-20 carbine made in 1906 and a .38-40 made in 1925). Both guns are much more reliable and are faster than the Rossi (now sold). They also continue to go up in value. Originals in shooter condition can be found for $1000 or less.

 

Apples and oranges. Bottleneck cartridges always feed better than straightwall cartridges.

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I like the 92, but I am being told that it will never be as fast or smooth as a 73. Hence, I am told, I will grow out of it quickly. What do you think?

Certainly, it is less than half the price of a new or even used and slicked 73. I have seen some video footage and it seems Kiowa Jones is the man for that weapon. He seems very convincing in his statements that a 92 can be made as smooth as a 73.

 

What are your goals in the game? Do you have any? What do you want to get out of the game? Good questions to ask yourself when selecting gear. Also go to a couple months worth of matches and count the number of 92's on the line. Look what is sitting in folks gun carts. When you invest in a gun for the game you are also investing in your enjoyment of the game.

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I like the 92, but I am being told that it will never be as fast or smooth as a 73. Hence, I am told, I will grow out of it quickly. What do you think?

Certainly, it is less than half the price of a new or even used and slicked 73. I have seen some video footage and it seems Kiowa Jones is the man for that weapon. He seems very convincing in his statements that a 92 can be made as smooth as a 73.

Plan on spending the most money and effort on your rifle to get started. I see more rifle trouble with new shooters than anything else. Stock revolvers and shotguns will function just fine. They get better with just a bit of work. Rifles can be quite different. There are VERY FEW rifles that will work well right out of the box. I cringe when I see a new shooter show up with a new 92 cuz I know they'll be fighting it.

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I have a 92, a 66 and a 73. None of them modified since I shoot with NCOWS I can't have short stroke or any of that speed stuff. It wouldn't matter anyway since I would never do that to my guns. I don't shoot for speed or points, I shoot for pleasure and the enjoyment of hitting a target with a well aimed gun. Nothing more fun than playing cowboy (or in my case Townsman).

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I have a 92, a 66 and a 73. None of them modified since I shoot with NCOWS I can't have short stroke or any of that speed stuff. It wouldn't matter anyway since I would never do that to my guns. I don't shoot for speed or points, I shoot for pleasure and the enjoyment of hitting a target with a well aimed gun. Nothing more fun than playing cowboy (or in my case Townsman).

 

 

I fail to see what the purpose was for your post. Do you stroll through the mall to tell young mothers that their babies are ugly?

 

I tried to get on the NCOWS forum to report you missing, but was not successful since my internet protocol was a post 1880 version and ,therefor, not allowed.

 

I'm sure I'll regret this in a few minutes, so I will post quickly.

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Oh, and by the way; thanks to Steve and J-Bar for all the great info. I do not know why you chose to put this post together at this time, but I have a 92 that I just purchased and had some real questions about its pedigree, All were answered by this post.

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I've got five '92's, and have owned three others -

 

Current

Rossi .44-40 RB SRC's, no safety (2)

Rossi .357 RB SRC's , no safety (2)

Rossi .44 mag RB SRC - I just bought it four days ago, NIB, and am awaiting delivery. No need for it, but @ $397, shipped, I couldn't pass it up. :P

 

Previous

Browning .357 - a very, very nice rifle, but it choked on .38's, so rather than have ONE gun I needed .357 brass for, I sold it and bought the two Rossi .357's with the proceeds. The Rossi's have never had a hiccup with 125 grain .38's.

Rossi .45 Colt (2) - 1 20" and 1 24" stainless, both octagon.

 

I've done some tuning & smoothing on them, except the Browning and one of the Rossi .357's, which was absolutely the smoothest rifle I've ever handled when I bought it - maybe it went through Steve's shop sometime in its past. ;)

 

All have worked just fine - my daughter won her category at the Montana state match two years running with the aforementioned smooth Rossi .357, 2nd place Cowgirl the next two years, third Cowgirl last year, and was the top woman shooter at the 2 day Montana Territorial match last year with it. :) All things being equal, I can't beat her anymore, no matter what I shoot. :(;):)

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I fail to see what the purpose was for your post. Do you stroll through the mall to tell young mothers that their babies are ugly?

 

I tried to get on the NCOWS forum to report you missing, but was not successful since my internet protocol was a post 1880 version and ,therefor, not allowed.

 

I'm sure I'll regret this in a few minutes, so I will post quickly.

Do you 'stroll' through the forum just to insult folk? Looks like <_<

Since that was your first post(sic), and after Rick's in this thread. RickB wasn't even talk'n to you........

"Do you stroll through the mall to tell young mothers that their babies are ugly?" WTH is your problem? :angry:

Carry on,

LG

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When you invest in a gun for the game you are also investing in your enjoyment of the game.

 

 

Mr. Deuce,

 

I agree, nicer and smoother guns are more enjoyable to most but what is nicest is a personal thing.

This is an expensive game to get started in. Sometimes we need to economize somewhere when we are starting out. One good point is that we can always move up to something else later :) -- when we get settled in the game. And, whatever we started with has residual value -- we can always sell it and recover much or most of what we put into it :) .

 

My son started with a Rossi 92, which I bought used for $300. When we decided to get him a '73, we sold the Rossi for $300. :) He turned out to be a pretty good shooter but might not have gotten into the game at all if we had to lay out a pile of money just so he could try the game and see if he liked it.

 

But, yes, as you said, nicer guns are more fun to shoot -- but I've had some pretty nice '92s. :)

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Mr. Deuce,

 

I agree, nicer and smoother guns are more enjoyable to most but what is nicest is a personal thing.

This is an expensive game to get started in. Sometimes we need to economize somewhere when we are starting out. One good point is that we can always move up to something else later :) -- when we get settled in the game. And, whatever we started with has residual value -- we can always sell it and recover much or most of what we put into it :) .

 

My son started with a Rossi 92, which I bought used for $300. When we decided to get him a '73, we sold the Rossi for $300. :) He turned out to be a pretty good shooter but might not have gotten into the game at all if we had to lay out a pile of money just so he could try the game and see if he liked it.

 

But, yes, as you said, nicer guns are more fun to shoot -- but I've had some pretty nice '92s. :)

Yes, here are the 92's I've used in the game. 2-20" carbines, 1- 16" trapper, 2-20 Short rifles, 1-brass framed 24" and one Brownng 20" carbine. .357's, 44's and 45's. shot them for the first 2 years. Wife and I started while still in college and newlyweds. Not a lot of spare $$$'to say the least. Know what it's like to shoot on a very tight budget and still do. I also didn't suggest not buying a 92' in my first post.

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What are your goals in the game? Do you have any? What do you want to get out of the game? Good questions to ask yourself when selecting gear. Also go to a couple months worth of matches and count the number of 92's on the line. Look what is sitting in folks gun carts. When you invest in a gun for the game you are also investing in your enjoyment of the game.

My goal is to get in the game. Presently I am shooting my own Blackhawks, my own SxS and borrowing a rifle for every match. Not a problem, just want my own and can't afford to put out $1000+ right the moment. I am saving my gold tho. As to my goals within the game, I am very competitive. I have always been "top of my class" in any shooting I have done. So, yes, eventually I want the slickest, fastest rifle out there. Am I good enough right now to justify the cost? Accurate, yes, but certainly not fast enough...yet. But speed will come with practice. This is my first foray into cowboy type gun competition. So, the question is ...Buy what I can afford right now and upgrade later, or keep borrowing and save for the "dream rifle"? BTW...not a single 92 at any match I have watched or shot in.

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This has been a very good thread and I have enjoyed all the post.

 

I've never owned a 92 but I have been tempted to buy one in .454 Casull. When I view Rossi's website, it appears that their .454 models all use the barrel band on the forend. I've never like those barrel bands. I would prefer one of the short barrel rifles with an end cap on the forearm.

 

But for now, I don't have the funds to be serious about getting one.

 

 

..........Widder

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I have two rossi 92s.

a .357 stainless with 24" octagon and a 45 colt 20' round blue. I did the action job, springs and polishing per Steve's Gunz video and with a little help from them resolved a feed problem with the 45 colt. They are a little bit of a pain the first tear down. They are both good running guns and I enjoy them. the 24" is a little too long and heavy but I ended up with it after a bad deal from a local gun shop (I wont go there again).

I did shoot a pards codymatic 73 last match so that on the radar for the future. But I don't think I will part with either Rossi.

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Mr. Deuce,

 

I agree, nicer and smoother guns are more enjoyable to most but what is nicest is a personal thing.

This is an expensive game to get started in. Sometimes we need to economize somewhere when we are starting out. One good point is that we can always move up to something else later :) -- when we get settled in the game. And, whatever we started with has residual value -- we can always sell it and recover much or most of what we put into it :) .

 

My son started with a Rossi 92, which I bought used for $300. When we decided to get him a '73, we sold the Rossi for $300. :) He turned out to be a pretty good shooter but might not have gotten into the game at all if we had to lay out a pile of money just so he could try the game and see if he liked it.

 

But, yes, as you said, nicer guns are more fun to shoot -- but I've had some pretty nice '92s. :)

It was a totally different time when your son started this game. SASS was growing at a much faster rate, so the market for used cowboy guns of any sort was very robust. Also 92s were a bigger part of this game. Now days a used 92 can linger in the classifieds while a marlin or 73 is snatched right up.

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Howdy:

 

I somehow seem to have amassed a small collection of '92's. I have 1 .44 Rem Mag in blue 20" RB. 1 44-40 SS in 20" RB, 1 44-40 SS in 20" OctB, 1 45 Colt SS 20" OctB, 1 45 Colt Blue and Brass 24" OctB, 1 .454 Blue 20" RB, and 1 .357 CC 24" OctB. I will probably keep them till I leave earth (or the gov calls them in) In any case Nate Kiowa Jones tuned the .45 Colt in SS and it runs like a top. I just have worked the daylights out of the others (over three thousands strokes of the levers on each) and they all work very smoothly.

 

The only thing I have done to them is replace the silly plastic followers with stainless steel one from the Smith Shop, and I have one with a Stainless steel follower spring. The others will be getting the Stainless steel follower springs from the Smith Shop come March (The Smith Shop is the Real Deal, IMHO).

 

I am not a fast shooter. I, like many here, shoot for the pure enjoyment and only want the rifle to be 1) reliable, 2) sage, 3 accurate and 4) sturdy (can be used for hunting). Some of the '92 are EMF, Some are Rossi, Some are Navy Arms, some are LSI, Some are Braztech-Rossi. All are, IMHO, humdingers and keepers. I will hate to leave when I leave earth.

 

STL Suomi

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I think we all shoot to have fun, whether that's going as fast as you can, or shooting C&B's, or dressing up like a B Western hero, or shooting Spencers or being the posse joker. ;)

+ 1 ;)

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Purchased my first Rossi SRC in 1987, .38/.357, 16" barrel and purchased my 2nd Rossi, .44 magnum 20", in 1990. (both pre-safety) (Puma Head and saddle ring on receiver).

 

Most of cowboy shooting was with the 44 mag rifle 20" barrel. Just recently sold it to another Cowboy. I switched to the Marlin CBC in 1998 or 2000 & now switched past couple years to the Beretta 73 and use the CBC for back-up rifle.

 

My Grand-Daughter used the other Rossi Puma .38, as did my daughter and son-in law. I still have it and plan on keeping it as got more youngsters coming up the ladder. None of the above shoot any more but my wife, Sly Puppy got into this action shooting and started with the Rossi .38. She now shoots the Marlin Cowboy rifle.

 

The 92 Rossi rifles may be slower then Marlin and 73's but the price is reasonable for folks starting out in this sport.

 

 

 

See you all on the range:

 

JRJ

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Purchased my first Rossi SRC in 1987, .38/.357, 16" barrel and purchased my 2nd Rossi, .44 magnum 20", in 1990. (both pre-safety) (Puma Head and saddle ring on receiver).

 

Most of cowboy shooting was with the 44 mag rifle 20" barrel. Just recently sold it to another Cowboy.

 

 

 

Yep, that's the one I was trying to research when this thread stated. :)

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I have an original Winchester 92 in 44-40, smooth as butter, and a Rossi 92 in 45 Colt that was smooth right out of the box. Naturally the old Winchester is a little smoother but I have no complaints about the Rossi. Good guns both.

Tascosa

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In the safe is an EMF 45 Colt Rossi '92. it has be 'smoothed' out and has in excess of 15,000 BP rounds down the bore:

* Been field stripped twice

* Never had a broken part

* No mechanical hiccups

* Is accurate to 200yds

* Lubed with Eezox, can cock the finger lever with my little finger ... so;

What else coud one ask from a rifle? :D

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