Jump to content
SASS Wire Forum

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Three Foot Johnson

The story of the Rossi 1892, as best I can tell...

Recommended Posts

My goal is to get in the game. Presently I am shooting my own Blackhawks, my own SxS and borrowing a rifle for every match. Not a problem, just want my own and can't afford to put out $1000+ right the moment. I am saving my gold tho. As to my goals within the game, I am very competitive. I have always been "top of my class" in any shooting I have done. So, yes, eventually I want the slickest, fastest rifle out there. Am I good enough right now to justify the cost? Accurate, yes, but certainly not fast enough...yet. But speed will come with practice. This is my first foray into cowboy type gun competition. So, the question is ...Buy what I can afford right now and upgrade later, or keep borrowing and save for the "dream rifle"? BTW...not a single 92 at any match I have watched or shot in.

Good honest straight forward answers. My advice would be to keep borrowing and save just a bit longer. If you buy a 92' you will soon out grow it. Save yourself time,money and wasted muscle memory.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Good honest straight forward answers. My advice would be to keep borrowing and save just a bit longer. If you buy a 92' you will soon out grow it. Save yourself time,money and wasted muscle memory.

+1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think I paid $220? for my M92 in .357 back in late 90's, I really like it, wish I could get one in SS but hate the silly safety.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think I paid $220? for my M92 in .357 back in late 90's, I really like it, wish I could get one in SS but hate the silly safety.

 

That's about what I paid for my .44-40 in 1998, at a gun show down in Belton, Texas. Dealer said he was tired of taking it from show to show because everybody wanted .357s. I'd been shooting a 24" 73 in the same cartridge, and that thing felt like a light saber in comparison. Did Rossi really stop making them in .44-40?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good honest straight forward answers. My advice would be to keep borrowing and save just a bit longer. If you buy a 92' you will soon out grow it. Save yourself time,money and wasted muscle memory.

Thanks Deuce,

I asked my mentors about this exact thing today. Their answers matched yours to the "T". I guess that is what I am gonna do then.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

I fail to see what the purpose was for your post. Do you stroll through the mall to tell young mothers that their babies are ugly?

 

I tried to get on the NCOWS forum to report you missing, but was not successful since my internet protocol was a post 1880 version and ,therefor, not allowed.

 

I'm sure I'll regret this in a few minutes, so I will post quickly.

Sorry my post got your panties in a wad. Guess you're one of those gamer types who are always offended when others choose not to do it your way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello All,

 

Don't want to highjack this thread, but thinking it's as good a place as any to step in the cowpie.

 

I'm VERY new to this game. Basically, would say I'm only in the parking lot, haven't made into the stadium, much less the field of play. Learned a lot from this thread, but still have a nagging question. Also, have looked through this and other forums and can't locate the answer to what I'm sure is a very silly question. Saw above about BP through a 92. So? If I have a .44 navy, can I use a cartridge rifle (92 or 72) and shotgun? And if so, how do I use BP in the cartridge weapons? See? SUCH a silly newbie question. Newbies! Don't ya just hate 'em? You can lead 'em to water but you can't shoot 'em. (Okay, well maybe this group can!)

 

Regarding my goals in the game - have fun, share in the fellowship while being a safe and considerate shooter.

 

Kind of reminds me a bit of golf. I'll never be the course champion, but I don't want to hold everyone else on the course up while I practice butchering the game. I simply want to go out and fire these .44C&B's, and would love to purchase and safely play with a decent lever gun sometime in the future, all the while dressed up as a cowboy? Who wouldn't want to do that?

 

Thanks in advance for helping the helpless.

 

PF WF

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love my 92 and my 73s.I am not that old in the game Poor.I am just starting to play with BP and a 73 is easier to clean after shoot BP in it.I shoot My 73 most of the time and I shoot smokeless most.one of my 92s is a brass frame and I would never sell it.The 92 is lighter but the 73 is faster in the right shooters hands,not mine.Shoot what feel good to you.I bought my first 92 because I could shoot a match without someone having to loan me a rifle and I am glad I did.Just have fun.My 92 is as much fun to shoot as my 73 they both go bang and sometimes the both go bang ,cling.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Poor Farmer,

To use blackpowder in a cartridge gun, just fill the brass casing with enough blackpowder that it leaves no air space. To make reduced recoil loads you can use less blackpowder but you must fill the void with another material(grits will work). Bullets with blackpowder specific lubes are important also for an easy clean up. I loaded up my first blackpowder cartridges a few weeks ago and will try them out Saturday in my Rossi 92 and my "58" Remington conversion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Again,

 

Thanks for the information. Haven't loaded my own ammunition before. But guess I'll have to get started.

 

Any and all other pointers/advice most appreciated.

PF WF

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Poor,

I've been shooting 777 in my .357 Rossi 92s and black in my various C&Bs and 12ga doubles. The 777 is easier to clean up in the lever guns but it doesn't make the BOOM that real black does. If you go to BP in the rifle then you will need to get/cast a bullet that carries a LOT of BP lube or you will have a fouled barrel in about the first 10 shots. I learned that back in 1993. If you use 777 or APP you can use any bullet and lube you want without having to cast them. Feel free to PM me or post to the Wire with ANY question you have. No questions are too dumb to ask only the guy who is too dumb to ask.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After having spent a little time with my newest Rossi '92, the aforementioned $397 NIB .44 mag, I would have to say it has slightly better fitted wood than previous models I've had from LSI and Interarms. The action is a bit stiff & rough, but certainly no worse than others I've purchased new in the past, and I'll have that fixed in a couple hours this weekend. The only notable difference I see in the Braztech version is, in addition to the pigtail safety on top of the bolt, Taurus has added their key lock on the lower side of the back of the hammer.

On the left side of the barrel is rolled "ROSSI .44 MAG", and on the right side is etched and gold filled, "BRAZTECH, L.C. MIAMI, FL. MADE IN BRAZIL BY TAURUS" The model and serial number are on the bottom of the receiver forward of the lever. The stock is dull/matte with open wood grain and is reminiscent of an oil finish. Bluing is on par with other mainstream CAS rifles available, the front sight has a brass button inlet into the back, and the rear sight is a relatively large, flat backed, deep semi-buckhorn with a six step elevator.

Overall, it is every bit as good as what has been imported in the past, but that should come as no big surprise, as it appears they are still being made by the same people in the same plant as in the past. It shoots very well, and I don't see any appreciable difference between this one and any of the earlier Rossi '92's I currently or previously have owned.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Howdy,

A stainless 92 saddle ring carbine is a wonderful thing to own.

It was my first choice to take shootin yesterday.

We used snow targets.

Parkin lot fulla ice.

First shooting for me in 2014.

We have some 45 inches over our usual 35.

I need to move.

BEst

Very Chili Ron

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I started with a 92 because a) I wanted to get started b ) I hated borrowing guns (still do, it's one of my quirks) & c) the price on 92s was $300 or so less than a Marlin, $500 or so less than a 73. The sticker shock when first equipping for CAS is pretty bad. Going with the 92 was a way to get started & that's how I approached it.

 

It was a nice gun out of the box, shot high because the front sight was too short. The action was meh at best. I immediately replaced the front sight, borrowed a friend's NKJ DVD, smoothed it up, added the Lee spring kit & it was a LOT better. It is still a dead reliable rifle that will feed anything including SWCs if you give the action a full, solid stroke in both directions.

One day while practicing with some friends who are long time shooters, I did a side-by-side timed comparison using my 92 & the friend's full-race 73, both in 45 Colt. The 73, first time I laid my hands on it, was 2.5 seconds faster than the 92 for 10 shots. That turned my head.

 

Since then, through trading & careful shopping, I have acquired a 1860 Henry, a Marlin 1984 CC & a 73 that I worked over myself so it is my main match rifle - all of which are faster than the 92 would ever have been. The 92 has been sold to a new shooter that also was worried about price.

 

I outgrew the 92. Not everyone does.

 

Holler

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IMO, if the difference between getting started right away w/a Rossi '92 or waiting for a year while you save up for a '73... GET the ROSSI! You have no idea what the next year will bring. Like another fellar I know... what was always waitin' for "everything I need", you could be dead... never having known the pleasure and fun you'd have been havin'! You could be moved across the country where there ain't a cowboy club... (not bloody likely), having never known the pleasure and fun you'd have been havin'! Or bunches of other calamities could have happened... one just never knows. Have your fun...

 

Unless you pay full retail for that Rossi, you'll probably get your money back out of it regardless when you've finally decided to take the plunge for the '73. Or... it'll make a dandy backup for yourself, a 1st rifle for a spouse, kid(s), or loaner for some other person trying to get started like yourself a while down the road!

 

The choice is yours... buy the Rossi now, die with a smile on your face havin' meet a bunch of new friends and enjoyin' yourself no end; or... die the grouchy, grump that's seen no pleasure or had any fun to speak of... :ph34r:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Like a lot of us, I started with a '92 back in the 20th century, and never felt handicapped by it. Today, I normally shoot the three mainstream SASS rifles; 1866's, 1873's, or 1894 Marlins, but I still have 5 1892's around too, as well as a Spencer, 1860 Henry, 1883 Burgess and a Thunderbolt pump, which is essentially a single shot. :( Now THAT one I definitely regret buying. :blush:

 

With a little work, there is absolutely nothing wrong with a Rossi '92, and most people will never be fast enough to outrun it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As is often the case, J Bar said it for me: "With a little work, there is absolutely nothing wrong with a Rossi '92, and most people will never be fast enough to outrun it." That's me, in spades.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like the two I have just fine, if I ever get to where the Rossi will only allow me to have 4 or 5 pieces of brass in the air at one time vs 8 or 9 from a 73, I may decide to retire them. For now I am a one piece of brass in the air kind of guy. I am toying with the idea of a new Win 73 in 44-40 for classic cowboy and BP shooting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.