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Do Turkeys have any nutritious value?


Widder, SASS #59054

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I'm sure a few wild animals would love to have turkey, any time of the year.

But,, to humans, do turkeys have any nutritional value?

 

They taste so bland, and sorta dry.

 

..........Widder

 

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Turkey is one of my favorite things in the world to eat. Roasted or smoked. 
It is nutritious as well. It’s about like chicken per serving.
Like @Marshal Mo Hare, SASS #45984said “Protein and fat”. Things that make the world go round. :)

 

(I see a TN joke coming)

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Turkey meat
/
Nutrition facts
 

Main Results

Butcher Boy Meats Turkey FranksCarl Buddig Smoked Sliced TurkeyLOUIS RICH Carving Board Turkey BreastLouis Rich Honey Roasted TurkeyLouis Rich Turkey BreastLouis Rich Turkey Breast and White TurkeyLouis Rich Turkey Nuggets/Sticks breadedOscar Mayer Turkey BreastTurkey, breast, rawTurkey, breast, roastedTurkey, dark meat, rawTurkey, dark meat, roastedTurkey, gizzard, rawTurkey, heart, rawTurkey, leg, rawTurkey, leg, roastedTurkey, liver, rawTurkey, packaged, low saltTurkey, whole, rawTurkey, whole, roastedTurkey, whole, roasted
 
Sources include: USDA
Amount Per 1 oz (28.4 g)100 grams1 bird (3,812 g)1 oz (28.4 g)
 
Calories 54
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 2.1 g 3%
Saturated fat 0.6 g 3%
Trans fat regulation 0 g  
Cholesterol 31 mg 10%
Sodium 29 mg 1%
Potassium 68 mg 1%
Total Carbohydrate 0 g 0%
Dietary fiber 0 g 0%
Sugar 0 g  
Protein 8 g 16%
Vitamin C 0% Calcium 0%
Iron 1% Vitamin D 1%
Vitamin B6 10% Cobalamin 5%
Magnesium 2%    
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
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Cook 'em breast down.  Breast meat will be nice and juicy, thanks to gravity. ;)

 

When done, flip 'em over to carve.  

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Wild turkeys fly...domestic do not. Wild turkeys are all dark meat. Dark meat is muscle that is used. 

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I rarely have a dry turkey.  My wife refuses to cook the turkey and years ago told me if I want one I have to cook it.  Been roasting them for years.  I season with salt and pepper and poultry seasoning and sometimes a little hot sauce before cooking.  I also put a small amount of water in the bottom of the roasting pan and keep it covered until the last 30 minutes.  I also put pats of butter under the skin and olive oil all over and a few pats of butter outside and baste it once in a while as it cooks.  Sometimes I also put white wine in the cavity but this year I forgot and it was still fine but did put lemon slices and carrots in the cavity.  
 

so now my turkey also has vitamin c and A from the carrots. 

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11 hours ago, Texas Lizard said:

If it helps they don't fly......

 

Texas Lizard

 

Oh, they can fly, wild turkeys that is. Not for a long way or very high and they land (if you can call it that) about as gracefully as a water balloon.

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13 hours ago, Widder, SASS #59054 said:

I'm sure a few wild animals would love to have turkey, any time of the year.

But,, to humans, do turkeys have any nutritional value?

 

They taste so bland, and sorta dry.

 

..........Widder

 

Well, all commercially produced meat taste bland if you ask me. They pump poultry with this and that chemicals to make them retain water and be larger than naturally possible so you pay more for what looks like more, but your mostly just paying for water. It’s a scam.

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6 minutes ago, Dirty Dan Dawkins said:

Well, all commercially produced meat taste bland if you ask me. They pump poultry with this and that chemicals to make them retain water and be larger than naturally possible so you pay more for what looks like more, but your mostly just paying for water. It’s a scam.

I don’t care what they inject in them Butterball turkeys but they’re great! They actually inject them with water salt and flavorings! I’m 76 and haven’t died from any commercial meat!

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My wife just read not to feed dark meat to dogs. It isn't good for them. White meat is ok. I didn't read the article but we make sure only to give our dog bits of the white meat.

 

TM

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1 hour ago, Texas Maverick said:

My wife just read not to feed dark meat to dogs. It isn't good for them. White meat is ok. I didn't read the article but we make sure only to give our dog bits of the white meat.

 

TM


 The people that posted that think that dark meat has too much fat in it and feel that it may cause digestive issues especially in small dogs. 
Other than that it’s perfectly safe for dogs to eat. 

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3 hours ago, Rye Miles #13621 said:

I don’t care what they inject in them Butterball turkeys but they’re great! They actually inject them with water salt and flavorings! I’m 76 and haven’t died from any commercial meat!

A lot of commercial poultry gets fed arsenic and copper sulfate

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17 minutes ago, Sedalia Dave said:


 The people that posted that think that dark meat has too much fat in it and feel that it may cause digestive issues especially in small dogs. 
Other than that it’s perfectly safe for dogs to eat. 

 

Onions, raisins and real chocolate. Those household items probably poison dogs more than anything else.

 

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42 minutes ago, Sedalia Dave said:


 The people that posted that think that dark meat has too much fat in it and feel that it may cause digestive issues especially in small dogs. 
Other than that it’s perfectly safe for dogs to eat. 

Thanks, I wasn't sure what the dark meat had other than more blood circulation that white meat didn't.

 

TM

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2 hours ago, Dirty Dan Dawkins said:

A lot of commercial poultry gets fed arsenic and  copper sulfate 

https://sites.dartmouth.edu/arsenicandyou/arsenic-in-meat-and-animal-products/

 

https://www.verywellhealth.com/copper-sulfate-benefits-4684436

 

Looks like no harm to humans!!

Edited by Rye Miles #13621
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7 minutes ago, Dirty Dan Dawkins said:

Knock yourself out….

Thanks, I will . I’ve made it 76 years without any problems because of any of the meat I eat. 

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7 hours ago, Rye Miles #13621 said:

I don’t care what they inject in them Butterball turkeys but they’re great! They actually inject them with water salt and flavorings! I’m 76 and haven’t died from any commercial meat!

Have t died from any non-commercial meat either.

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I stuff mine with fresh sage, chopped white onions, cut up apples and add chicken stock and Apple juice. Baste to your preference.

And the cooking upside down thing mentioned earlier really works good! Cook until the thickest part of the breast is 165°

If you go much over that it will start to dry out.

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I usually roast the bird until the meat temp gets to about 155, then pull it, cover it with foil and an old towel, and let it rest for about a half hour before I carve it.

 

Then meat temp gets up to 165, the juices run clear, and the meat is juicy and tasty.

 

I know the skin will never be crispy with the turkey covered that way, but I'll take the trade-off for keeping the meat from drying out. Given any specific piece, you give up a thin sliver of maybe crispy skin, and get a thick slice of juicy meat.

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54 minutes ago, Ozark Huckleberry said:

I usually roast the bird until the meat temp gets to about 155, then pull it, cover it with foil and an old towel, and let it rest for about a half hour before I carve it.

 

Then meat temp gets up to 165, the juices run clear, and the meat is juicy and tasty.

 

I know the skin will never be crispy with the turkey covered that way, but I'll take the trade-off for keeping the meat from drying out. Given any specific piece, you give up a thin sliver of maybe crispy skin, and get a thick slice of juicy meat.

 

That's how I cook my arsenic and copper sulfate also, just the foil though. Don't like dry turkey at all. Glad Mrs. Sun likes the white meat, I like the dark meat with dressing, real giblet gravy and jellied cranberry sauce.

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 If a Turkey didn't have nutritious value, no critter would want to eat it. Wildanimals eat them, they eat all the parts. Why wouldn't my dog be able to eat dark meat?

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