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Bitterroot Jake, SASS #9532

Capping a precussion revolver question

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This was brought up in a discussion with a friend recently and I could not give him an answer that I knew was absolutely correct. I have looked through the Shooters Handbook and RO1 mamual,did it very quickly at work so I may have missed the answer to the following question.

 

Is a shooter allowed to remove the charged cylinders from his C&B revolver at the loading table to cap them by hand the put them back into the revolver?

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Sure - but if you drop it , even with only one cap installed, you're done for the day. Not sure why one would want to do it.

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Once you place a cap on a charged cylinder, it becomes a gun. I suspect you could do it, but you'd be bound by the rules for handling a whole revolver from the point of installing that first cap on. The cylinder would have to remain pointed down range during the entire process of capping and re-assembling the gun.

 

I've disassembled and cleared a jammed cap gun on the firing line on several occasions. I'm very careful to keep both the barrel and the cylinder pointed down range when the situation arrises!

 

 

Hey PaleWolf!! How'd I do??

Edited by Blackwater 53393

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Too dangerous IMHO

Most of us use cappers

Split Rail, a national and world champion, uses his fingers to put caps on the nipples

He always has

But the cylinders are in the guns

My short stubby Italian fingers won't let me do that

I wouldn't share the loading table with a shooter who took the cylinders out to cap them

Too many chances that something would go wrong

Just my two cents

--Dawg

Edited by Prairie Dawg, SASS #50329

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He doesn't like using a capper because of sometime they fall off, his reason is he can squeeze the caps and put them on with confidence that they will stay on.

 

I did for one match by hand with the cylinder in the gun and it was a pain. And that was on new nipples, the match before I had at least one cap per gun come off per stage with the new nipples.

I had replaced them because the other were becoming deformed. They had been on the cylinders for about 12 years

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Sounds like your friend needs to replace the nipples with some that the caps fit.

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Actually with a conversion cylinder, there is much less manipulation

You drop in the 5 rounds, put on the backing plate, and put it in the gun

With a cap gun you have to individually install the 5 caps and then seat them

Then install the cylinder in the gun

There are so many better and safer ways of capping the gun that I would wonder about a shooter who wants to cap the cylinder off the gun

 

And yes he should replace the nipples with Treso or Slix

I've heard that track of the wolf stainless are good, but I have never used them

Treso/Slix and Remington number 10 caps are the ticket

--dawg

Edited by Prairie Dawg, SASS #50329

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Sounds like your friend needs to replace the nipples with some that the caps fit.

This is the best solution.

 

Until he can do this, he could "pre-pinch" the caps before coming to the range and put them in a capper.

Edited by J-BAR #18287

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He also pointed out that a lot of conversion cylinder must be taken out to be loaded so what is the difference?

 

There isn't, it's basically the same thing.

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He doesn't like using a capper because of sometime they fall off, his reason is he can squeeze the caps and put them on with confidence that they will stay on.

 

I did for one match by hand with the cylinder in the gun and it was a pain. And that was on new nipples, the match before I had at least one cap per gun come off per stage with the new nipples.

I had replaced them because the other were becoming deformed. They had been on the cylinders for about 12 years

 

Best thing since beer in a can is the wooden or antler boolit pushers people have, I use them to set my caps after using the capper.

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Too dangerous IMHO

Most of us use cappers

Split Rail, a national and world champion, uses his fingers to put caps on the nipples

He always has

But the cylinders are in the guns

My short stubby Italian fingers won't let me do that

I wouldn't share the loading table with a shooter who took the cylinders out to cap them

Too many chances that something would go wrong

Just my two cents

--Dawg

If you haven't noticed Split Rail is not of this world. He operates in some sort of a time warp.

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Anyone that recommends "squeezing" caps to make them "fit" on the nipple is osmeone you don't want to be taking advice from. Sure sign the shooter does not know what they are doing.

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Anyone that recommends "squeezing" caps to make them "fit" on the nipple is osmeone you don't want to be taking advice from. Sure sign the shooter does not know what they are doing.

I only suggested "pre-pinching" because the shooter said he was already having to pinch his caps at the loading table. I've never done it myself.

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I only suggested "pre-pinching" because the shooter said he was already having to pinch his caps at the loading table. I've never done it myself.

I was referring primarily to Post #5. Pinching caps is not the solution to loose fitting caps.

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Best thing since beer in a can is the wooden or antler boolit pushers people have, I use them to set my caps after using the capper.

Don't you have to worry about setting off a cap by pushing on it with something hard? Saw a pic once of an exploded thumb from pushing on a cap with it. Just curious.

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Don't you have to worry about setting off a cap by pushing on it with something hard? Saw a pic once of an exploded thumb from pushing on a cap with it. Just curious.

There's hard and then there is HARD. No one in their right mind is going to use a steel rod to push on a cap. Most people use deer antler, a piece of wooden dowel or plastic. One of the purposes is so you don't wind up with an exploded thumb. Remember the word "pushing." The object is not to hammer, smash, use a hydralic press, etc., the object is to "push" the cap on until it seats. Many posts are made about center fire rounds not going off on the first hit. The first question usually asked is are the primers seated to the bottom of the primer pocket? Same with a C&B. You want the top of the nipple cone to be in contact with the priming compound inside the cap. You also want a friction fit between the nipple and cap otherwise the cap will fall off when the gun fires. So with proper fitting nipples AND caps they are a sliding fit and merely need to be "pushed" onto the nipple. Anything other than that and the shooter needs to work on their nipple/cap fit.

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I would not be at the loading table either if someone capped a cylinder outside the frame and then replaced the cylinder. The original post did not say what brand of caps he was using or what size cap. I have had good luck replacing any of the three caps that Dawg mentioned with Remington #10. I use the back of my in line capper to seat the caps because you do not have to have that much pressure to seat the cap. I have used other cap brands and was not pleased. Put on better nipples and use Remington caps and he will not have to squeeze then to make then stay in place. Works for me.

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Before I knew any better, I used to pinch caps to keep them from coming off of stock nipples during recoil. Then years ago I discovered correct replacement nipples and proper fitting caps. Haven't pinched caps in the last decade or so...

 

I don't see why anyone would want to load percussion caps on their cylinders off the gun. It's a pretty simple affair to stick them on properly at the loading table.

I use my fingers instead of a capper, (personal preference), and if they need seating, seat them with the eraser of my trusty number 2 unsharpened pencil.

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My friend uses #10 Remington caps as do I. Before I changed the nipples I never had a problem with caps falling off. I had shortened the old nipples a bit so that when seated the caps where we're on a fatter section of the nipples. I never had time to do these as I got the nipples the day before the match. I use a short plastic rod to set the caps.

 

I do occasionally have a spent cap fall off,usually between my hand and the grip,not a fun experience.

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IThe original post did not say what brand of caps he was using or what size cap. I have had good luck replacing any of the three caps cones that Dawg mentioned with Remington #10. I use the back of my in line capper to seat the caps because you do not have to have that much pressure to seat the cap. I have used other cap brands and was not pleased. Put on better nipples and use Remington caps and he will not have to squeeze then to make then stay in place. Works for me.

Having capped my cylinders out of the gun in the past, (the few times I shot with an 1858, back in 1987), I can't say I wouldn't share a loading table with someone who did, but... I'd watch 'em like a hawk!

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There's hard and then there is HARD. No one in their right mind is going to use a steel rod to push on a cap. Most people use deer antler, a piece of wooden dowel or plastic. One of the purposes is so you don't wind up with an exploded thumb. Remember the word "pushing." The object is not to hammer, smash, use a hydralic press, etc., the object is to "push" the cap on until it seats. Many posts are made about center fire rounds not going off on the first hit. The first question usually asked is are the primers seated to the bottom of the primer pocket? Same with a C&B. You want the top of the nipple cone to be in contact with the priming compound inside the cap. You also want a friction fit between the nipple and cap otherwise the cap will fall off when the gun fires. So with proper fitting nipples AND caps they are a sliding fit and merely need to be "pushed" onto the nipple. Anything other than that and the shooter needs to work on their nipple/cap fit.

After reading this post, I can't think of a single thing to add. So I guess +1?

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I do occasionally have a spent cap fall off,usually between my hand and the grip,not a fun experience.

 

Sounds like my experience with Remington "1858"s. :lol: That fun moment while the palm of your hand is being branded and you pause in your shooting string long enough to maintain your coolth before pressing on!

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Sounds like my experience with Remington "1858"s. :lol: That fun moment while the palm of your hand is being branded and you pause in your shooting string long enough to maintain your coolth before pressing on!

 

 

That's exactly why I gave up Frontiersman and went back to FCGF. I loved never having cap jams with my Remmies, but I got sick of burning and cutting the palm of my right hand on hot, busted caps. I've thought about buying and slicking up a couple of Navy's, but it will be awhile.

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There's hard and then there is HARD. No one in their right mind is going to use a steel rod to push on a cap. Most people use deer antler, a piece of wooden dowel or plastic. One of the purposes is so you don't wind up with an exploded thumb. Remember the word "pushing." The object is not to hammer, smash, use a hydralic press, etc., the object is to "push" the cap on until it seats. Many posts are made about center fire rounds not going off on the first hit. The first question usually asked is are the primers seated to the bottom of the primer pocket? Same with a C&B. You want the top of the nipple cone to be in contact with the priming compound inside the cap. You also want a friction fit between the nipple and cap otherwise the cap will fall off when the gun fires. So with proper fitting nipples AND caps they are a sliding fit and merely need to be "pushed" onto the nipple. Anything other than that and the shooter needs to work on their nipple/cap fit.

Thank you for that follow up Larsen

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Best way to fix this problem is get caps that fit nipple or nipple that fit the caps. Then use a capper of your preference. Squeezing caps isn't safe in my opinion. They are not suppose to go off just squeezing them. If one does when squeezing it........it will hurt and a trip to hospital will happen.

 

There is a picture of a thumb on the web. It was Cuts Crooked's thumb from pressing on a cap. Not pretty.

 

Be careful out there.

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A couple of our C&B shooters have started applying a little nail polish to the nipples before seating their caps. They claim it helps keep the caps from falling off during a stage. They have had much fewer problems since they have been using this step.

 

Is this a common practice? I had never heard of it before they started doing it.

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Cartridges!!!!! :P:P:P

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A couple of our C&B shooters have started applying a little nail polish to the nipples before seating their caps. They claim it helps keep the caps from falling off during a stage. They have had much fewer problems since they have been using this step.

 

Is this a common practice? I had never heard of it before they started doing it.

I've used nail polish but didn't find any better results. Joe West is a firm believer in it. Keeping hammer face clean, between stages, seems to help from cap sucking. Edited by Blue Wolf , SASS# 29424L

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Sounds like my experience with Remington "1858"s. :lol: That fun moment while the palm of your hand is being branded and you pause in your shooting string long enough to maintain your coolth before pressing on!

 

 

"coolth" -- now there's a cool non-word. So cool I would be so bold as to nominate it to full-fledged word status...

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I wipe my Hammer sides and face after every stage, no cap sucks and usually four out of five caps are still on the cones and must be lifted off at the unloading table.

Polish those Hammer faces and keep them clean !

I can not see nail polish on the cones doing much past the first stage.

Edited by Lefty Dude, SASS # 51223

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You have to use the nail polish on every stage. Some cap then polish and some polish then cap. Cleaning hammer works best for me. To each his own.

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Im new to C&B revolvers.

But I just bought a perfect angled Antler at the Gun Show today.

It is a key chain.

 

I looked at it and said .

That would make a great Cap Pusher ! LOL .

 

And now I just read about it :-)

 

My two new 1858 Remys with My Henry 1860,

And My Single Shot Shotgun Should be a blast to shoot ,

This Year.

 

Yes it will be SLOW .

But the I will see how long everyone can hold there BREATH ! HE he he !

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