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Well, it looks like my season is over for this year...


Dutch Wheeler

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Spent the last five weeks doing physical therapy to treat what was originally diagnosed as a left shoulder sprain resulting from a fall back in June. Unfortunately, the shoulder has not improved, so I had an MRI this week, and a follow-up with my orthopaedic surgeon yesterday. The results of the MRI is that I have a "massive" tear of the Rotator Cuff, and will require surgery to repair. :(

 

I typically shoot a match every weekend. However, the past eight weeks, I have not been able to enjoy my beloved activity as a result of the pain in my shoulder. I have deeply missed Cowboy Action Shooting, and spending time with the good folks that I am usually with. Not looking forward to a long recovery and being out-of-action for the next six months either, but, it is, what it is.

 

See ya down the trail.

 

Dutch

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Spent the last five weeks doing physical therapy to treat what was originally diagnosed as a left shoulder sprain resulting from a fall back in June. Unfortunately, the shoulder has not improved, so I had an MRI this week, and a follow-up with my orthopaedic surgeon yesterday. The results of the MRI is that I have a "massive" tear of the Rotator Cuff, and will require surgery to repair. :(

 

I typically shoot a match every weekend. However, the past eight weeks, I have not been able to enjoy my beloved activity as a result of the pain in my shoulder. I have deeply missed Cowboy Action Shooting, and spending time with the good folks that I am usually with. Not looking forward to a long recovery and being out-of-action for the next six months either, but, it is, what it is.

 

See ya down the trail.

 

Dutch

Sounds like you are now the dedicated TO & PM for the matches you usually attend.

 

Cheers.

 

PS,,, Since you are the PM, you can shoot duelist using pistol on rifle targets and pistol on SG targets too. A new, unofficial category. Stage the approperate pistols at rifle/sg locations. Remember, you can take pistols with you to restage at another location. ;)

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A lot of clubs in Ohio shoot Josey Wales class using staged pistols to shoot all the targets.

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Sorry Dutch... I have been putting off some Hand surgery too, just because I don't want the down time. I wish you a speedy recovery.

 

Snakebite

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Dutch - that stinks, but at least you now have a definitive diagnosis and treatment plan. Lots better than 'take it easy and check back with me in a month'

 

I wish you a successful surgery and rehab.

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Sorry to hear that. Hope you have a speedy recovery.

I shoot three times a month and really look forward to each up-coming shoot.

 

Prayers up for a speedy and swift recovery.

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Wow, sounds like my situation. I have one rotator cuff muscle in my right shoulder completely detached and will be having the same surgery. I fell in April and continued to shoot until I developed Plantar Faciitis in my left foot in late June. I haven't shot a cowboy match since July 2. I had continued to shoot with the shoulder problem, it was the foot problem that sidelined me. Had to miss Guns of August and will miss the Michigan and Indiana state matches as well.

 

While I still can't run, at least I can walk and I am determined to shoot Back at Cha' in September and then have the surgery. I'm going to see if I can get a cortisone shot for the foot before the match. In the meantime I have been shooting various steel challenge type events with semiautos since they don't require any movement.

 

Getting old ain't for wimps!

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Dutch...I have been in and out of shooting from the ongoing chemo so I can understand your sadness being out of commission. I will include you in my prayers for healing....God bless you and your family as you journey thru these uncharted waters...Jim

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We wish you best in your recovery. Had to take six months off for a hip replacement. After 18 months I am still in a lot of pain but able to shoot. SASS shooter have been incredible in allowing me to shoot yet not over do it. I am so appreciative. Heal up and get back soon.

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praying for a speedy pain free recovery!!!

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Dutch I've been out now for 4 years.

 

1st was Rotator with the right shoulder. The Branson, Mo. State match was the only match I made that year

 

The next year it was a left Knee replacement

 

The 3rd was the Rotator on the left shoulder

 

This year I needed the right knee replaced, but have been putting it off as long as I can

And I have been fighting lower back pain. My Docs would do the surgery (I need 1 on the lower back and ! on my neck) but again I have been putting it off as long as I can, and now when I stand up my blood pressure drops 15 - 30m points and some times I look like a drunk trying to walk,

 

But I have been taken off of 7 of my meds. and I'm m starting to feel better

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Been there, done that. If you'll permit me to give you some unsolicited advice, try to get the shoulder as strong as possible BEFORE surgery. Lots of pulling exercises worked for me. The healthier the joint is going into surgery the healthier it will be coming out and that will speed up the healing process.

 

Regardless of that, sending up healing prayers for you. Hope you get back to 100% real soon.

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I had it done last summer. the early care and the PT is the key!! If you can get the "cool suit" sleeve, it will make your early recovery and comfort much more relaxed and you'll be able to get off of the meds much quicker! That way, you won't have to mess with keeping ice packs going all day and night. Plan on being totally USELESS for at least a week!!

 

DO THE PHYSICAL THERAPY RELIGIOUSLY !!

 

Getting the re-attached tendons stretched and supple and the muscles toned and strengthened is essential! DO IT!!

 

Also!! Plan on spending a couple of weeks in the recliner!! You most likely won't be able to or, for that matter, even want to lay in the bed!!

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I've had 4 of them, 2 in each shoulder.

 

do the PT, it does make a difference.

 

I know it doesn't seem like it now but you will be back and with much less pain.

 

I had to realize I no longer am able to pick up heavy stuff--let the young ones do that. My club job now is to cut grass rather than do the heavy lifting when repairing stage buildings and such. Hardest thing for me was realizing I could no long work like I used to. Once I accepted that life got my better

 

did go to a 20" rifle vs. my old 24" but that's about the only difference.

 

cr

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Show up , shoot what you can and then enjoy every ones company. I had a similar injury back in the mid 80s had the surgery the end of June first of July. It was April before I was able to use my left hand like normal and I still had problems for a year if I got in a certain position it pop out. I know medicine has changed a lot since then, I'm walking with two legs as proof. But if you shot that much you really like it and will miss it. So get in what you can before surgery. After the surgery get all the training videos and books you can and learn their main points. After three months you might be able to start dry firing and transistions with limited live fire with the non injured hand and shoulder. You might need to shoot with the non injured side. Live shotgun will be last. Most docs will not want you moving the injured shoulder for a month to six weeks post surgery that hinders what you can do with the other hand during that time or the majority of it. Move you non injured hand and arm see if the injured shoulder feels it at all if so that action is out during the beginning of the healing. So if your not able to play physically then learn everything again so it fresh in your mind when you go about relearning your muscle memory. You might actually come out faster when you return fully if you want. L

 

Learn the different sweeps so that when you hear a sweep you instinctively know the target order.

 

Watch all five of evil Roy's video as each concentrates on one aspect of the game. You should learn something from each.

Watch long hunters video he has some newer views and ideas that will help.

Read breaking the shot IIRC it's the beginners guide to cowboy action shooting

Read enos book on practical shooting several things in there will help

Also there is a book on competing mentality try it .

 

When you redevelop you training regimen for CAS take all the stuff you learned above and write out your plan to recovery .

 

Include the actual drills that you will be doing create a spread sheet for times so you'll need a timer to track your improvement.

Each training session should have one primary , one secondary and a third goal. The primary goal may be breaking the first shot from the holster, the secondary goal may be transistioning from one pistol to the other, the third goal might be reacting to the timer.

 

That practice session might go something like this

 

ATB draw first pistol fire one shot then holster while drawing second pistol fire one shot holster repeat until tired or out of ammo if done live.

 

Basically you drawing firing holstering draw and firing and holstering over and over until you get tired for dry fire live fire it will be either five or six rounds per gun if you put a round under the hammer if it is safe for your gun( mainly un modified Rugers. Note two ten round Ruger revolvers would be great for live fire.

 

Next take and develop a training plan for drawing and firing five rounds for accuracy and transition ing to the second pistol.

 

Then they're other revolver drills out there that will help you m the you have rifle drills, shotgun. Drills and transition drills plus anew drill is moving from one shooting position to the next then they're mental training that needs to be done. Like the pre shooting mental walk throu first in slow mode to insure you see every step of the stage from loading the guns, three mental runs of the stave, then walking to the line then staging your guns and ammo per instructions then getting ready for the beep the every action to shoot the stage, what gun, what's the sweep where should I be how am I'm going to get there for each position and gun now your done you require you long guns and head to the unloading table was everything done correctly if not what needs changing you hear clean and a time as you head to the unloading table there you cleat you guns and safely head to your cart to put your guns away. Now play it again faster this time, the last time you should being going as fast as you can and hit the targets, if you modified it the it goes back to the first run until no modifications then run is faster each time so when you actually go to the line you have shot this stage at least three times clean so rely on your subconscious to get you thru the stage with the conscious overseeing it. I read that subconscious movement or much faster than conscious movements.

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Dutch, you've gotten a great deal of really good advice from pards who've been through the same mill you're looking at.

I can add nothing to their first hand experience and sound advice, but I can add this having been a rehab nurse for post surgical patients:

Before you head for PT -- BEFORE you go -- take the pain pills and don't try to put your head down and bull your way through it (translation: don't imitate my bad example!)

P.O. meds -- meds taken by mouth -- take a half hour to become effective, and after you hurt like homemade hell is not the time to give up and say okay, gimme the pill.

Take the pain meds, THEN go to the PT, and (*whisper mode on*) it's perfectly okay to flirt outrageously with any sweet young thangs that might be a-workin' Physical Therapy that day (*whisper mode off!*)

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Being a twenty year vet with chronic pain one of the hardest things to accept was take something early while it will help if you wait until the pain is so bad that you have to take something it either fails to work or Thames for ever to kick in because by then the nerves are inflamed and non reactive to the meds. If you hit the meds at the first Sidney of pain it will not hurt as bad and you'll require less meds in my experience.

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First of all, I wish to extend my deepest, heartfelt appreciation to everyone for your kind advice, comments, support and prayers. The SASS community is a wonderful family to be a part of!

 

My opening post was, what I thought to be, the bad news, but it has slipped a little farther downhill...

 

Since I also had a heart attack back in June, and had two stents implanted, my cardiologist advised me this afternoon, that he won't clear me for surgery until I have been on the blood thinner Brilinta for at least six months, which puts the soonest I can even schedule the surgery, into December! :(

 

Not sure yet where I go from here as far as PT and pain management is concerned, but for my mental health, I guess I will at least hang-out at the matches I usually attend weekly, otherwise I will go crazy the next 3+ months!

 

I really miss all of this, and the better part of me already knows the answer, but should I try to shoot through the pain, or just suck it up and sit on the bench and help out the posse where I can?

 

It sure has sucked turning 60 this year! Buffy, you said it best: "Getting old ain't for wimps!"

 

Dutch

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How is the time to plan your trying routines since you got the time to research test some and figure out things, when you see your surgeon ask him about your recovery time frame like how long before you are to the first step up in doing stuff and how long before you are able to use the other hand freely, when will you be able to start moving your operated arm and hand how long til light duty with it, medium activities, then when he exspects fully recovery, then start shooting then finally cleared for shooting shotguns, then recovered completely. That way you'll have an idea of what to exspect. I never thought it would be almost a year recovery in my case and the surgeon had more to do when he opened up than was planned. My incision went from an inch or so to from the top of my shoulder halfway around it.

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