Jump to content
SASS Wire Forum

Need a shotgun


paradiddle

Recommended Posts

Howdy - I'm a shotgun away from having my guns purchased for getting into SASS.

 

I've done a lot of searching and reading on this and other forums.

 

SKB seems to be the "favorite" and perhaps "best" but finding a good older Japanese one, that doesn't have cracked wood, seems to be an expensive challenge.  There is one, in my state actually, that has a Johnny Meadows action job on it - but the seller is asking $2500.  That seems like a LOT but frankly I don't know - it could be worth it.

 

The Stoeger is typically thoughts of as an entry level and doesn't interest me at this point.

 

The Browning BSS is also no longer made, and has a pretty high premium but I've read the least about it at this point.  The consistent feedback I see is "it's heavy".

 

Griner does his CZ Shaprtail all in for $1400.  This seems like a fair/good price for the work from a gunsmith that is very well regarded.

 

I read about Longhunters CZ Sharptail but there is no information on their website if they still work on them - it only shows handguns and rifles.

 

I live in California if anyone can think of a local vendor/source for them - it appears all the Cowboy smiths have wisely fled this state...

 

So - with all that typed up, and I know it's nothing new, what is the consensus on a SXS?

 

1 - get the CZ, practice with the extra $1000 saved over a SKB, and enjoy?  Which gunsmith should I go with?

2 - save and spend the cash on a SKB - either get a stock one and have Fast Eddie do it (as Johnny Meadows is retired) or find one built?

3 - do something else?

 

Thanks for your time


Jeff

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Call Fast Eddie first and see if he has any available at this time.

 

Your other options are wisely numbered.

 

Best regards

 

..........Widder

 

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Get a slicked up Stoeger and start playing. No need to break the bank right away. 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Howdy Para, and welcome to the game.

 

I started with a double trigger Stoeger and quickly discovered that my speed was restricted by having to move my finger between shots.  The CZ Sharptail replaced the Stoeger rather quickly but we never really got along.  It had an annoying habit of closing slightly when trying to shuck hulls thereby preventing the rims from clearing the receiver.  Shortening the cocking rods would have solved the problem but I was hating CZ and on the hunt for a better shotgun by then anyway.  On the advice of some shooters I had been trying to catch for a while (and still am), I ended up with a Fast Eddie SKB.  It was such a game-changer that I bought a second.  Yes, they are expensive but worth every penny, in my humble opinion.  Looking back, I wish I would have started with the SKB.  

 

The direction you go will depend on what your goals are for CAS.  Just going to shoot to have fun without concern about your placement on the scoresheet?  The Stoeger will do just fine.  Want to get good enough to remain at or near the top of the standings?  Bite the bullet and get a worked-over SKB or BSS.

 

Of course it's not a SxS but the other option is a Winchester 97.  Some folks can run them as fast or faster than a SxS but not me.  I run mine like a drunk monkey.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Too many prospective new shooters assume that they have to stay home until they have purchased all of the gear.  Those of you who have SOME notion that you MAY be interested should attend a local match BEFORE buying anything.

 

Let’s assume that someone has done that and has decided to get started.  Get to a local match with whatever you have.  Bring SASS-legal ammunition.  Chances are good that you will get a chance to try some different firearms.  In my area it’s not unusual to find good used gear for sale at matches.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You won’t go wrong with an SKB. 

Fast Eddie

Johnny Meadows

Doc Noper 

Shotgun Boogie

 

there are others, but these are all excellent smiths. 
 

if you don’t like it, you can sell it easily, probably at a profit! 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Stogger or bakal  when slicked up a bit works just fine. I normally shoot my stoger single trigger that was slicked up by Johnny meadows and have used it at bordertown, winterange and eot.  I also have a taylors single trigger that was more expensive also slicked by Johnny. Sure skband browning are top shelf but never going to make you a world champ. Practice loading and transitions.

Rafe 

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Been using my Stoeger for 13 years without issue. I reversed the double triggers and your finger just slides back to the rear trigger. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My first SxS was a new double trigger Stoeger that didn't work very well. I took it to Johnny Meadows and he did his magic and it worked like it should for SASS. Decided I wanted a single trigger so I sold my Stoeger to a new shooter and bought a CZ Sharptail. I had some minimal work slicking it up so it opened and closed easily and had the Johnny Meadows bend in the opening lever. Been shooting it for a year now and I love it.

 

Tex

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks guys.  Lots of threads on single versus double trigger.  It seems to be very much a personal preference thing.  Any recommendations?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 minutes ago, paradiddle said:

Thanks guys.  Lots of threads on single versus double trigger.  It seems to be very much a personal preference thing.  Any recommendations?

Go to a match and try some to see what you like.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

21 minutes ago, paradiddle said:

Lots of threads on single versus double trigger.


A lot of the double trigger guns can have the triggers reversed. I’ve seen several fast shooters shoot double trigger guns. This way you can rake or sweep the triggers. 
 

Couldn’t see where it was mentioned, but if you go the route of a single trigger I’d really advise to do a mechanical trigger setup and do away with the inertia. But that is all preference. 

Edited by Leroy Luck
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you wanna go with the "best" SxS, there is really no contest.   And believe it or not, you CAN get one on the used market for less than $1000.  
I speak of the greatest American, or any, SxS ever made, the Parker.   You will never go wrong with one.   And you don't have to spend thousands to get one.   I picked up a Trojan 12 gauge for $700 in 2019, and a 20, another Trojan, for $900 just last year.   Both are in excellent, shootable condition, even if they have no original finish left, which I feel gives them some character.


 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, Shawnee Hills said:

I started with a double trigger Stoeger and quickly discovered that my speed was restricted by having to move my finger between shots.

Move what finger? Index finger on front trigger, middle finger on rear trigger. Only lefties should need a side-to-side trigger swap.

 

Don't pull both at once unless you want to know the meaning of "give 'em both barrels."

 

SKB is the gold standard and my slicked Stoeger breaks open by itself with many commercial loads. Not using it until I have a reliably light load that does not do so. Partly as I do not feel it is safe nor competitive, and partly because removing lockup is a prohibited modification. It is not actually removed, but does not stay reliably locked after the first shot.

 

I have a couple '97s to try out and hope to actually do some shooting after this heat wave breaks. I do like the double-trigger Stoeger and it is fun to run gripping the stock and using two fingers as the design intended.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, John Kloehr said:

Don't pull both at once unless you want to know the meaning of "give 'em both barrels."

 

Oh a rare occasion when I was using my short barreled Parker, with black powder no less, I had a stubborn target that would not go down.   So, out of frustration, I gave it both barrels.   When the smoke cleared, sure enough, the target was down.   People laughed.

Edited by H. K. Uriah, SASS #74619
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Lots of opinions on this thread so here is mine.  I started with a long hunter CZ sharptail and it is an excellent shotgun.  Several months after starting I found an SKB and bought it.  It is a few ounces lighter than the CZ but not a lot.  I switched to the SKB and the CZ became a back up.   I got a young man started in CAS and he was on a budget so I loaned him guns.  He liked the CZ so much he asked me to sell it to him.  I had picked up another SKB so I sold him the CZ.  In my opinion if I were starting out again and wanted a gun that would run with the SKB's but not cost what they do I would go with the CZ again.  The CZ's haven't been in the game as long as the others so can't attest to the longevity of them but so far they have been really good shotguns. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

SKB, one and done. While others will work there is no comparison. I have seen several selling recently at local matches in the 1200-1500 range ready to go.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If not stuck on a SxS you might check out the new 1887s imported through Cimarron.  Very reasonably priced at around $550-575, functional out of the box, legal in every SASS category and can double as a Wild Bunch gun.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.