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Subdeacon Joe

WWII Rations

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Then and now, no difference. What the pictures show and what you actually get on your tray table are two different things. :wacko:

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WW2 propaganda, Armor & Co Meat In The Service.jpg

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This one isn't military, but I found it while looking for more like have been posted.  Sounds good enough that I typed it up and saved the recipe.  Seems like a good base for lots of things.

 

Onions and beans.jpg

 

Northwoods Beans

Ingredients:

 

6 Large Onions

2 1lb Cans Baked Beans

3 TBS Fat or Salad Oil

1 Cup Ketchup

1/2 Green Pepper, sliced

2 TBS Worchestershire Sauce

 

Directions:

Cook onions 20 minutes or until tender; drain.

Place onions in baking dish.  Remove centers from each; chop centers; cook with peppers in fat until slightly browned.

Add ketchup and Worchestershire Sauce.  Place beans in centers and around onions.  Add Sauce.  Bake in hot oven, 400 F for 25 minutes or combine in deep skillet.  Heat and serve.  6 Servings.

1952 Ann Page Brand recipe

Northwoods Beans.docx

Edited by Subdeacon Joe
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7 hours ago, Subdeacon Joe said:

Mmmmmm....good stuff. 

 

 

FB_IMG_1605220017975.jpg

 

6 hours ago, Alpo said:

WW2 propaganda, Armor & Co Meat In The Service.jpg


Lyin’ bass-turds :lol:

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I was reading the ad that Joe posted. One of the items listed is evaporated prunes.

 

Isn't that a redundancy?

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20 minutes ago, Alpo said:

I was reading the ad that Joe posted. One of the items listed is evaporated prunes.

 

Isn't that a redundancy?

 

Yes and no.  Prune does usually refer to dried plums of any type but it is also used to refer to the freestone plum that is grown for drying.   Here in Sonoma County it is common to see fresh prunes in stores. 

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Even if it wasn't as advertised, it was probably still better then the bully beef, hard biscuits and soya link sausages that the British troops got.  You know British rations are bad when they consider K rations a significant improvement.

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"C"s were such an upgrade over "K"s that the troops thought they had died and gone to culinary heaven.  I will admit that some of the "C"s were so bad we were sure they had been made so as a training exercise to prove to us we could eat anything if necessary.

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16 hours ago, Subdeacon Joe said:

This one isn't military, but I found it while looking for more like have been posted.  Sounds good enough that I typed it up and saved the recipe.  Seems like a good base for lots of things.

 

Onions and beans.jpg

 

 

 

 

The "11¢ per serving" is a nice touch

 

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I sold a box of unopened WWII K rations for $110 on E bay a while ago.

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16 hours ago, watab kid said:

spam , its whats for dinner ...and breakfast and lunch 

When my Dad came back from WWII he told my mother if she ever served Spam, it would be instant divorce!  They were married 67 years when Dad passed at 98.  We never had Spam! :P  OTOH, I only remember having SOS once in AFROTC summer camp! :rolleyes:

Stay well and safe!

Edited by Trailrider #896

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Cold Spam sandwiches were what I took for school lunches each day in elementary school for several years.  When my father got a raise, that changed and I swore off Spam forever.  My wife and I were grocery shopping this summer and she threw a couple of cans in the basket for hurricane season and I didn’t care.  One evening, my wife heated up the Spam and I was surprised how good it tasted hot.

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4 hours ago, Trailrider #896 said:

When my Dad came back from WWII he told my mother if she ever served Spam, it would be instant divorce!  They were married 67 years when Dad passed at 98.  We never had Spam! :P  OTOH, I only remember having SOS once in AFROTC summer camp! :rolleyes:

Stay well and safe!

Yeah. Ditto.  :D

 

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i never had to eat spam at home - my father said similar after his time in the pacific , but we kids often took it camping - not sure whos folks provided it , not mine , but there was a time or two when it actually was good ....i generally caught fish and cooked that but there was a time or two when they were not biting , 

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LRRP?

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7 hours ago, Alpo said:

LRRP?

LRPs were the best! As long as you had potable water, and as compared to C rats or Mr. E's, anyway.  Still have 4 or 5 packages, just for grins. Of course, the last one I opened about 15 years ago was fuzzy on the inside, and emitted a whitish-blue dust...

 

(Long Range Patrol ration.)

 

Edited by Palouse
...where is spell checker...
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Of course, Top Ramen tended to be the primary nutrition source during field training excercises, with bits and pieces of the issued food packs added for variety.  

 

(C ration canned pork patties = Spam with no flavor.)

Edited by Palouse

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Growing up, my Mom made candied spam( done in a syrup made with brown sugar and cloves). She also made SOS for me and her usually on a Sunday evening when Dad was working. She did a pretty good job with both, I really didn't seem to mind at all:blush:

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On 11/13/2020 at 8:59 AM, Cheyenne Ranger, 48747L said:

 

 

The "11¢ per serving" is a nice touch

 

 

Depending on how and where you shop it would likely be between 50 cents and 90 cents a serving now. 

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i cant bring anything like this into my home these days , my wife - a navy brat , was raised on rations and will not allow it , i think i can shoot a squill in the backyard if i cook it tho , 

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SOS is frequently on our menu.  Make with burger and put it on biscuits.

SPAM is in the pantry but does not come out too often,

 

I was spoiled by my army experience.We were a heavy artillery unit and our cooks were highly competitive with other branch cooks.  When the 3rd Inf down the street were eating beany weenies we had T Bones and baked potatoes. We could never find out what the cooks were trading to keep a battalion supplied with good eats.

The scroungers were good.  I was S-2 and when all our officers went to VN I became S1, S2, Battalion Exec, S3 and for a while Hqs Battery Commander. S-4 came to my office and asked if I would mind if he got something in trade that we were not supposed to have but would be nice to have around.  He had found an unfired and had like 5 hours on the diesel, 8" self propelled howitzer.  It had been brought to Germany for a demonstration and forgotten.  The Colonel would not let us have it.

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On 11/12/2020 at 4:45 PM, Subdeacon Joe said:

This one isn't military, but I found it while looking for more like have been posted.  Sounds good enough that I typed it up and saved the recipe.  Seems like a good base for lots of things.

 

Onions and beans.jpg

 

Northwoods Beans

Ingredients:

 

6 Large Onions

2 1lb Cans Baked Beans

3 TBS Fat or Salad Oil

1 Cup Ketchup

1/2 Green Pepper, sliced

2 TBS Worchestershire Sauce

 

Directions:

Cook onions 20 minutes or until tender; drain.

Place onions in baking dish.  Remove centers from each; chop centers; cook with peppers in fat until slightly browned.

Add ketchup and Worchestershire Sauce.  Place beans in centers and around onions.  Add Sauce.  Bake in hot oven, 400 F for 25 minutes or combine in deep skillet.  Heat and serve.  6 Servings.

1952 Ann Page Brand recipe

Northwoods Beans.docx 12.12 kB · 1 download

Eat outdoors, in a mild wind? 

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14 minutes ago, Badger Mountain Charlie SASS #43172 said:

Eat outdoors, in a mild wind? 

 

Away from the fire.

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On 11/13/2020 at 6:06 AM, Noz said:

"C"s were such an upgrade over "K"s that the troops thought they had died and gone to culinary heaven.  I will admit that some of the "C"s were so bad we were sure they had been made so as a training exercise to prove to us we could eat anything if necessary.

It has been 50 years since I have eaten C rations.  All I remember is most of them were barely edible cold.  LeRP rations were a lot better.  Knowing that I'd be eating them for 7 days during the 1971 Reforger exercise I smuggled a single burner camp stove & fuel in Co equipment to heat C-rats during the week of war games.

Edited by J.D. Daily
misspelling

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2 minutes ago, J.D. Daily said:

It has been 50 years since I have eaten C rations.  All I remember is most of them were barely edible cold.  LERP rations were a lot better.  Knowing that I'd be eating them for 7 days during the 1971 Reforger exercise I smuggled a single burner camp stove & fuel in Co equipment to heat C-rats during the week of war games.

I didn't see much to recommend them either, during operation wintershield. 

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15 hours ago, Noz said:

SOS is frequently on our menu.  Make with burger and put it on biscuits.

SPAM is in the pantry but does not come out too often,

 

I was spoiled by my army experience.We were a heavy artillery unit and our cooks were highly competitive with other branch cooks.  When the 3rd Inf down the street were eating beany weenies we had T Bones and baked potatoes. We could never find out what the cooks were trading to keep a battalion supplied with good eats.

The scroungers were good.  I was S-2 and when all our officers went to VN I became S1, S2, Battalion Exec, S3 and for a while Hqs Battery Commander. S-4 came to my office and asked if I would mind if he got something in trade that we were not supposed to have but would be nice to have around.  He had found an unfired and had like 5 hours on the diesel, 8" self propelled howitzer.  It had been brought to Germany for a demonstration and forgotten.  The Colonel would not let us have it.

I think I only tried SOS once.  I first had to get beyond its' appearance, looks like the solid stuff in a newborn's dirty diaper.  The taste had nothing to write home about.  The mistake is as a gravy to cover biscuits its' lack of spicy taste makes for bland (meals on wheels) culinary experience.  My mothers creamed chipped beef on toast was much better.  I didn't like the saltiness of chipped beef.

For about half my time in VN I had a special assignment.  I was the broadcast engineer for the 25th ID'd pirate radio station in Dau Tieng.  The radio station & MARS radio station were in the same location & platoon.  The E6 platoon leader traded not having to wait in the MARS station hooch's waiting room for hours to get a chance for a conversation with  loved ones at home to the base S-4 senior NCO for steaks, chicken, spam & LRP rations.  The base mess served only pot roast & spam.  The chicken & steaks went to the guys on top of Nui Ba Dinh & the the S-4 NCO & friends.  I gained a lot of weight at the time & had to work out before meeting the misses in HI.

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That's why I've never understood this nationwide love of sausage and gravy biscuits.

 

It's SOS. And people that would not touch SOS with a 10-ft fork will sit down and scarf up a mess of "sausage and gravy biscuits".

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