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Chantry

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About Chantry

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  • SASS #
    28543
  • SASS Affiliated Club
    CT Valley Bushwackers

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Central CT
  • Interests
    I have become addicted to English hammered shotguns to the detriment of my wallet.

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  1. Since 9/11 there have been armed fighters on alert around various high value targets in the United States. At times they will be launched to investigate an aircraft that is not behaving as it should, this is almost always pilot error for the "suspicious" plane.
  2. What is this "turn signal" you speak of? It's not something those of us in the Northeast are familiar with....
  3. It would probably be considered "fruit of the poisoned tree". The officer would have to explain WHY he decided to look for the beer cans so without overhearing that conversation it would be unlikely that the officer would have known to go look for the beer cans.
  4. First, I'll note that vet bills have gone way up since I adopted my Jack Russell Terrorist ten years ago, so $1100 for the biopsy and test doesn't sound too outrageous. There is no "right" answer, I'm currently in a similar position as my JRT's kidneys are only functioning at about 50%. You have to decide what is best for your pet, as a pet owner we have an obligation to take care of them, but we also have the obligation to make sure they aren't suffering. As to the rest, it's subjective and dependent on your income and how much more time you will get for your money.
  5. Probably either USS Sacramento (AOE-1) or USS Camden (AOE-2). When the decision was made to scrap the USS Kentucky (the 5th Iowa class ship laid down) the engines were taken out and split between USS Sacramento & USS Camden. "Now, I've heard all those wild Enterprise (CVAN-65) and New Jersey (BB-63) super-speed stories during the eight years of my enlistment. The Enterprise could certainly outrun Bainbridge and we never sailed with New Jersey. But, I have to say, I never saw any ship run away from us like the Sacramento did that day. She was running light (she looked like she
  6. American ingenuity USS Lexington supplies power to the city of Tacoma, Washington: https://historylink.org/File/5113 "In 1929, western Washington state suffered a drought which resulted in low levels in Lake Cushman that provided water for Cushman Dam No. 1. The hydro-electric power generated by this dam was the primary source for the city of Tacoma and the city requested help from the federal government once the water in the lake receded below the dam's intakes during December. The U.S. Navy sent Lexington, which had been at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in Bremerton, to Tacoma, and
  7. The disappearing gun would have the ability to traverse, probably 30-45 degrees to each side depending on the fortification and what it was intended to cover. If one goes on Google Earth you can see the firing pits, it is just to the north of all the barracks with the red/orange roofs and the just southeast of that weird man made lake with the structure in the middle of it. Sadly at least one of the pits seems to be used as a junkyard for cars. The two pits were for 12" Model 1890 M1 breech loading mortars and there would have been four of them, two in each firing pit and would
  8. The disappearing gun was often used in the early days of breech loading coastal artillery as the best way to engage enemy warships while still protecting the gun from return fire. Aviation was still in it's infancy and the main batteries of warships lacked enough elevation to get "plunging fire" so overhead protection for coastal artillery was not needed.
  9. Not quite as fast as people believe, I'll let the link explain why far better than I ever could: http://www.navweaps.com/index_tech/tech-028.php
  10. One wonders how it would handle with battle damage or engine failure. My guess is very poorly.
  11. That's not spoiled, spoiled is when she has her own chair, which is arranged so she can look out the sliding glass door and is equipped with a heating pad to help with her back pain.
  12. What a superb gun. At the Battle of Samar Strait, the 5"/38 used with the Mark 37 fire control system, US destroyers were hitting Japanese warships at the maximum range of the gun, which was farther then the maximum effective range of the Japanese heavy cruisers. As an aside, the destroyer escort USS Samuel B. Roberts with a designed maximum speed of 24 knots, achieved a maximum speed of 28.7 knots, just under 120% of maximum power during the battle, a tribute to the engineering crew of the ship and the build quality of the engines and related equipment. Link:
  13. Perhaps in WWII, but biplanes were normally seen on even US Carriers into 1941: The Grumman F3F was a biplane fighter and the Vought SBU Corsair & Curtis SBC Helldiver were dive bombers, all of which saw service lasting until 1940. Another side note is that the Royal Air Force had complete control & procurement of the Royal Navy's aircraft until the beginning of 1939.
  14. Based on the aerials on the wing for the radar, these appear to be Swordfish MKII's which were introduced in 1943 and the ship is an Illustrious class aircraft carrier. The one glass enclosed biplane is the Fairey Albacore, the "replacement" for the Swordfish which ended being removed from service before the end of WWII while Swordfish continued in front line service until the end of the war against Japan. The Swordfish was roughly the same size as the F6F Hellcat. With a landing speed of about 58 knots and the wind over the deck of at least 20 knots, it was landing at 38 knots ,
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