Jump to content
SASS Wire Forum
Sign in to follow this  
Dirty Dan Dawkins

Colt reproductions

Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)

Probably a dead horse but the search engine is too broad.....so let’s beat this horse again, and I can learn something.....

 

Colt clones: I’m not interested in originals for this conversation or such irrelevant comments as “I don’t know, I only shoot Rugers” or “I don’t know I only shoot originals.”

 

So, four-click, three-click, hammer block, floating firing pin: who makes what, why the change, what for, what are any issues, are any issues reasonable to address? Can you get mechanically authentic replicas still or are they a thing of the past?

 

 

Edited by Dirty Dan Dawkins

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Warden nailed it. You could pay more but not necessarily get better. I bought a pair of 38/357's awhile back and didn't do anything to them except change the grips.

Lucky

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

UBERTI CATTLEMAN

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, cajun bandit said:

UBERTI CATTLEMAN

Easy on the Cattleman. They've swithed to the hammer with the "safety" firing pin. Some folk have reported problems, although the one I bought to match an older one with the 4 click that I already owned hasn't had any problems.

I believe that currently only the BP frame Uberti and the Pietta made Californian/ Alchemista have the traditional "4 click" hammers. 

I could be off, so there's that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Dirty Dan Dawkins said:

So, four-click, three-click, hammer block, floating firing pin: who makes what, why the change, what for, what are any issues, are any issues reasonable to address? Can you get mechanically authentic replicas still or are they a thing of the past?

 

 

Single Action Cartridge Guns. Pietta vs Uberti, which is better quality and why?
It is surprising how often this question is asked. And you'd think that the answer to your question would be simple. Ford vs.Chevy, (Oy!) But, it's not. All Ubertis are not alike. All Piettas are not alike. Uberti's Colt-repro cartridge guns are broken down into 3 main categories. The "Conversion" guns, (Open Tops), the "Old Models", (copies of the Colt SAA Black Powder Frames), and the Pre-War models, (copies of the Colt SAA, after 1900) with the more convenient, spring-loaded cylinder pin release.
Pietta Models are broken down into specialty lines available through some major distributors.
For a comparison to the first Colt Single Action Army revolvers, the Uberti "Old Models" comes very close, for a mid-priced revolver. They are pretty faithful reproductions. You can tell which ones they are, the cylinder pin is retained by a locking screw in the front of the frame. These are easily found on the Cimarron Firearms website.
 
Then comes the most numerous of the Uberti models, the "Pre-War" (WWI), with the more convenient cross-pin cylinder pin latch... in 2016 Uberti announced a new "safety system" that would safely allow the carrying of 6 rounds in your 6-shooter. For those who do not know, conventional 6-shooters could only be safely carried with 5, and the hammer down on an empty chamber. That is because the firing pin would rest directly on the primer of the 6th round, dropping the gun, (as many have done, even Wyatt Earp), or even knocking something against the hammer, has resulted in unfortunate consequences and a number of lawsuits. This is what caused Ruger to go to a Transfer Bar Safety in all their revolvers in 1972.
 
Anyway, Uberti went a different way with their Pre-War models, with a Retractable Firing Pin. in 2017 the first reports of light primer strikes and Failure to Fire started cropping up. Some of it is user error. The new system requires that the shooter hold the trigger all the way back locking the firing pin forward. This intentional over-travel in the trigger is designed in, and those used to black powder revolvers or other single-action revolvers were not used to this slightly different trigger-hammer mechanism. Some of it was a mechanical error. As in all relatively inexpensive, mass-produced items, roughness of fitting at either the trigger end, the actuator bar, or at the hammer end of the mechanism, caused light primer strikes. 
 
This happened with a minority of Uberti's guns. More disconcerting to a number of shooters is that this mechanism has only "3-clicks" as the hammer is pulled back instead of the customary "4-clicks". Those who want a more historically accurate gun, do not like this. Please note, that if everything is working properly there is no difference in the final operation between the 3-clicks and the 4-clicks. Except for the trigger pull and those guns with mechanical difficulties that caused the light hammer strikes, the guns have, for the most part, proven satisfactory.
 
In competition guns, as in Cowboy Action Shooting, there was a big push to get the new Uberti pre-war models to operate the same as they had before. Stocks of older hammers sold out quickly for all the distributors and parts houses. There are gunsmiths who have converted over hundreds of these guns, back to the functioning of the "Old Models". When Cimarron or Taylors gets a small shipment of replacement Old Model hammers they are quickly sold out.
 
There are several ways for the handy user to defeat the Retractable Firing Pin System, including some that are completely reversible, should you ever wish to part with the gun. A converted Uberti's action is smoother and lighter than that of a gun with a functioning Retractable Firing Pin.   Uberti has not put this new safety system in its "Old Model" guns or its Conversion, or Open Top models. If you wish to have a reproduction of the Single Action Army of the 1800s, Uberti does a nice job.
 
Pietta: As with Uberti, all Piettas are not alike. As with Ruger and Uberti, Pietta found that many of the buyers on the mass market are not aware of the need to carry only 5 rounds in a 6-shooter. So, those models sold through Cabelas, Heritage, and many mass marketers, have a Transfer Bar Safety.   Unfortunately, Pietta's Transfer Bar was found to be fragile. Many of them failed, and energy could no longer be transferred from the hammer to the frame-mounted firing pin. Of course, this is completely covered under warranty, but the user is without a gun until it comes back from repair. People described the Pietta Transfer Bar as being made of "pot metal".   Pietta, realizing the problem, has now upgraded their Transfer Bars.   But, if buying a used gun, or one that has been in a dealer's stock for a while, be aware of at least the potential for a breakage.
All that being said, Pietta did not put a Transfer Bar Safety in all its single-action revolvers. Pietta bought the distributor, EMF. On the EMF website, Pietta markets a line of revolvers called the "Great Western II" This is an extensive line of revolvers that is as close to a "Pre-War" Colt Single Action Army as one can get in a mid-priced gun. Cimarron, another distributor of Old West firearms, began marketing some Pietta guns. They now have many models without a Transfer Bar Safety, starting with the lower cost Brass back-strap and trigger guard model called the "Pistolero". which is limited to one barrel length, 4-3/4".  It also comes in stainless steel at a little higher price, where the backstrap and trigger guard are all steel. These guns also appear on Bud's site occasionally.
Cimarron also markets an extensive line of "Frontier" revolvers, similar to EMF's "Great Western II" line. They have many with Black Powder Frames, including one that looks and feels like the original 1873 Cavalry Colt, and many of the "Pre-War" frames. Quite a lot to choose from.
 
Back to the original question, "Which is better, Uberti or Pietta?" The answer is "both". For an "Old Model" Black Powder Frame reproduction of the Colt Single Action Army, the Uberti and Pietta have some very nice examples. For a more convenient, post-1900 model, the "Pre-War" frame, certain Pietta models seem to hold an edge over the Uberti.   But both Uberti and Pietta have very nice black powder frame models that are faithful to the 1800's Colt.
 
Of course, there is always another option. For sheer reliability and longevity, it is hard to beat a Ruger. Yes, the New Vaquero is one ounce heavier than the same caliber and barrel length of Pietta or Uberti, and it balances in the hand a bit differently, but when shooting, the differences seem to go away. 1970's technology over the 1840's technology. It is probably best to add in an inexpensive lighter spring kit when investing in a Ruger.
There seems to be endless choices. So, you, the buyer, have to factor in a number of "wants" along with your budget considerations, before you buy.
 
 
  • Like 12
  • Thanks 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, Hendo said:

Easy on the Cattleman. They've swithed to the hammer with the "safety" firing pin. Some folk have reported problems, although the one I bought to match an older one with the 4 click that I already owned hasn't had any problems.

I believe that currently only the BP frame Uberti and the Pietta made Californian/ Alchemista have the traditional "4 click" hammers. 

I could be off, so there's that.

I have the older models

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
42 minutes ago, McCandless said:

 

...  Uberti has not put this new safety system in its "Old Model" guns or its Conversion, or Open Top models....
 

 

I think the new 1862 pocket pistol .380 conversion uses a retractable firing pin as well.  Don't know if that is a predictor of what is to come on the OT/conversions but we will see.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
36 minutes ago, cajun bandit said:

I have the older models

I honestly didn't know about the changeover to the new hammer when I bought my second shooter. 

I had the first pistol (Cimarron Model P) for quite a few years and shot the hell out of it at the range.

When I joined SASS, it was a no brainer and just ordered another of the exact same thing.

 

Truth be told, I thought I broke it for the first 2 or 3 days. :lol:

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have the discontinued Taurus Gaucho's in .45 Colt.  They are Colt sized, supposed to have Colt type actions, have 4 click hammers, but have the transfer bars like Rugers.  They shoot like a dream so far.  Typical for Taurus, you're either going to get good ones or lemons.  I was lucky and bought mine from another pard here on the wire and got damned good ones.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

 

PLUS ONE too McCandless  :D

 

Very well explained.  Good JOB!!

 

FORGOT.  CAVEAT:  I personally hate the term "Clone(s)".  The available guns are in no way "Clones."  Replicas they are.  Also my personal preference is Pietta GW II.  Best value for dollar in todays CAS guns.

Edited by Colorado Coffinmaker
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When talking accurate reproduction,  I'm of the opinion the Pietta is the winner.  I'm hearing many Pietta parts will interchange with Colt.  The Uberti and now Standard Manufacturing single action are scaled up just a bit.  

 

My BIG problem with Pietta is their limited numbers of calibers available.   Most ever model is only available in 357 Magnum or 45 Colt.  Only a small number of 44WCF and no 38WCF that I'm aware of or even 44 Spacial.  I'd think a stainless 44WCF would be a home run. But no... 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the last 20 years, so many Colt reproductions have come and gone.  Most lamented was USFA, who made quite a nice revolver.  The last time I came across a USFA in a gun store it was some horrendous zippy-looking .22, where you had to put your hand in front of the muzzle to cock it.  I believe the gun store had it on display for four years, without ever selling it.  Standard Manufacturing seems to have picked up where USFA left off.   But, it is not in the realm of a mid-priced gun.

 

Now, if somebody comes along with a working Merwin-Hulbert .44-40, I'll have to pry my wallet open!  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Besides the three click/4 click hammer, there are some other differences. Uberti’s are slightly larger in the frame and cylinders. They beefed these areas up to Get around the weakest point in these types of revolvers in 45 colt: the thin cylinder walls. Pietta did not go this route and still have the same dimensions as a Colt. USFA also went with the Uberti dimensions, as has Standard. As far as I know, both pietta and uberti use a Ruger style coil spring hand/pawl instead of the leaf spring. USFA and Standard use the leaf spring. Pietta uses a long two stage base pin as the safety. They also notch it twice on one side instead of all the way around like a Colt and uberti. Uberti base pins will fit pietta for an easy replacement if one doesn’t like the extended base pin look. A colt base pin won’t fit either model. 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Reader's Digest version:

1. Uberti makes two varieties. 

First: The "smokeless" new model, that has the retractable firing pin, and has "3-clicks".  You can load six in the cylinder, unless you are shooting in a C.A.S. event.  Then you load five. Beretta made the decision to do this for safety's sake, and for legal reasons to help (but not eliminate) their liability when the sheeple shoot themselves, or someone else, because they do not take responsibility to read and follow the common sense safety measures with firearms. 

 

Second: The "old model" or "black-powder frame model".  So far, it still has the non-retractable firing pin, and "4 clicks" and is more like the original Colt revolver design.  You load five, and rest the hammer/firing pin on the empty chamber.  So far, you can still purchase the "old model" or as it is sometimes called, the "blackpowder frame" version.  Again, I say..."so far". 

 

Some Pards, that have purchased the new model, with the retractable firing pin, have no issues with it, and others have had issues with it.  Bottom line, if you purchase one, you cannot load six in the cylinder, and shoot at C.A.S. events, and second, some seem to work fine, with no problems, others not so much, so...you plunk down your money, and you take your chance that you will get a good one.

   

2. Beretta purchased Uberti a while back, and they offer a revolver, or did, with a transfer bar system, similar to the Ruger.  Not sure if they still produce that design, since it seems it went over with the C.A.S. crowd, like a lead Zeppelin.  The general attitude seems to have been if you want a revolver that has a transfer bar system, then purchase a Ruger. I have heard good things about that design, and not so good, so again. you have to research that, and make a decision as to purchase it, or not...if they still make that model, that is.

 

3. Pietta, so far, still makes the "smokeless frame" model with a non-retractable firing pin, and "4 clicks".  They don't seem to offer the revolver in such calibers as .38 WCF, or .32 WCF...so far.  They offer .357 magnum, .44 WCF, and .45 Colt calibers.  I am not sure they offer a revolver with a 7 1/2 inch barrel.  They have come up quite a bit in quality, over the last few years, (they only had one way to go, and that was up) and many Pards now prefer the Pietta over the Uberti.

 

There is an American manufacturer of clone single actions, but they are about as pricy as a Colt single action, so I won't go into that here. You have $1,800 to $2,000 to spend, then why not go ahead and buy a Colt.  I would not spend that much on a clone of a Colt...but....I am sure some would (U.S.F.A. for example).

 

That's the short, Reader's Digest version.  If you want a "War and Peace" version, I can't help you.

 

My Two Bits.

W.K.

 

 

   

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, McCandless said:

 

Single Action Cartridge Guns. Pietta vs Uberti, which is better quality and why?
I
 

 

WOW, great explanation. Thank you for that, this is the info I would have loved to read years ago when I first started looking at single action pistols. 

 

I've had my New Vaquero (.357) for about a year now. Its an early '06 NM Vaquero. I recently picked up an Uberti Cattleman Hombre (.357) in a trade. 

 

I have not had any issues with the Uberti, and honestly I think the trigger pull is better than the Vaquero. The Uberti's trigger pull came in at 2.5-2.75lbs. The Vaquero came in at about 3.5lbs. 

 

The Uberti is definitely lacking in fit and finish compared to the Vaquero as well as "smoothness". The hammer pull on the Uberti is very heavy. I did get a Wolff spring kit for it. It could also use some polishing. 

 

The Vaquero's hammer pull is smooth and light (for an unworked gun). I did get a spring kit for that as well, with the 17lb/30oz kit. 


I've enjoyed owning both and comparing them and will shoot my first match this year with both. I'd love to try out some Piettas. Just my $0.02 so far 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, Waxahachie Kid #17017 L said:

...3. Pietta, so far, still makes the "smokeless frame" model with a non-retractable firing pin, and "4 clicks".  They don't seem to offer the revolver in such calibers as .38 WCF, or .32 WCF...so far.  They offer .357 magnum, .44 WCF, and .45 Colt calibers.  I am not sure they offer a revolver with a 7 1/2 inch barrel.  They have come up quite a bit in quality, over the last few years, (they only had one way to go, and that was up) and many Pards now prefer the Pietta over the Uberti....

 

Yes, you can get Piettas in 3 1/2" through 7 1/2" and at least one 10" model (in .45) that I know of.  Pietta also makes a BP frame model.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The wolff main bring is hardly any better, just as stiff to me

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is good to find out that Pietta makes a revolver with various barrel lengths, and with the black-powder frame.  I do remember now that they make a "Cavalry model", with a 7 1/2 inch barrel,  and an Artillery model, wit a 5 1/2 barrel, both with a black-powder frame. 

Now...if good ole Pietta would just do a better job of all the writing on the barrel, or hide it under the ejector housing, like Uberti, I would really be pleased.

Yep...I'm being picky.  Sorry.

 

The only two Pietta's, that I own, are the Remington "shooters revolver", and the single action Starr revolver, both of which are cap and ball revolvers. 

The price of the shooter's revolver has gone up to nearly a thousand bucks, so I am super glad I bought one many years ago.  I'm not sure they make the Starr reproduction anymore.  They may, but just not sure. 

 

I must say, the Pietta's have gotten a lot better over the years.  That is a win-win for all of us.

 

W.K. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Colorado Coffinmaker said:

 

PLUS ONE too McCandless  :D

 

Very well explained.  Good JOB!!

 

FORGOT.  CAVEAT:  I personally hate the term "Clone(s)".  The available guns are in no way "Clones."  Replicas they are.  Also my personal preference is Pietta GW II.  Best value for dollar in todays CAS guns.

You are absolutely correct and I have edited the title to reflect such.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, McCandless said:

Now, if somebody comes along with a working Merwin-Hulbert .44-40, I'll have to pry my wallet open!  


I take it you’re not interested in making a pre-production deposit?

  • Haha 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pietta has a couple of Colt features that are not found on Uberti.

 

2025745250_PiettaEleminatorfiringpinbushingAug2018.jpg.841b2d2d352e2dfbcf28ce908f7fd6d8.jpg

 

One is a replaceable firing pin bushing.  

 

1036252639_PiettaEleminatorhandandhammerAug2018.jpg.86c73b77daa06b5c7947ac1ab70d870f.jpg

 

The other is a replaceable cam on the hammer. 

 

I recently used a Pietta cam to repair a Colt hammer. 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

I don't have any Piettas, but I do have several real Colts, and most of the other clone makers.   Let's do some comparison.

 

Here is what we will be comparing.   For the record, all of my clones, and most of my Colts were bought on the used market.  Everything has four clicks.

 

IMG_0945.thumb.JPG.14bef7f9ea8e754c16bd751a163a8dde.JPG

 

On the left from top to bottom is a First Generation Antique, a Second Generation, an early Third Generation [the kind without the removable cylinder bushing] and a late Third Generation that restored the removable bushing.   These late Thirds have sometime erroneously been called Fourth Generations, but that is a misnomer.   It's the only one I bought new.

 

On the right from top to bottom are the original clone, a Great Western Arms revolver, an original EMF made by Jager Adler in Italy, an Armi San Marco set up in military configuration, a heavily modified by my Armi San Marco on a smokless frame, and an Uberti.

 

IMG_0946.thumb.JPG.f74fd86d7961908038489b7f1a716c59.JPG

When you compare the ASM to the First Gen, you can see how things on the First Gen changed.   The ASM is of course set up like a very early Colt, with the bullseye ejector, which did not last for long on the real Colt.

 

IMG_0947.thumb.JPG.1a83555a428540750072265d9a9919a7.JPG

 

A curious difference is how the ASM has a scalloped firing pin, but the Colt has the cone one.   It is my understanding that the scalloped firing pin is a much later feature.  More on that in in a moment.

 

IMG_0949.thumb.JPG.44be606b04c5894abd4e9e8e2dbce71a.JPG

 

Here is the most significant difference, the ASM has this two position cylinder pin.  If you lock the screw on the rightmost indent, the gun will function properly.  If you lock it on the left indent, that is the safety position, which prevents the gun from firing.   Of all the different safeties on the clones, I find this to be the least obtrusive.   

 

IMG_0953.thumb.JPG.52437b42b3455e26b370d7aa2bfbdcfb.JPG

The above shows how the cylinder pin sticks out of the frame when it is in the safe position.  

IMG_0950.thumb.JPG.ef94ed85a09512474f4348da05d7342f.JPG

 

This compares the cylinder pin from the heavily customized smokless frame ASM to one from a Thrid Gen Colt.   I include this because I want to mention that a Third generation pin does fit and work just fine on all of my clones.

 

IMG_0955.thumb.JPG.9d8c0ab5f738bcef55e374db00f66aca.JPG

 

Here is the EMF Dakota.   The most obvious difference is the brass triggerguard and backstrap.  The frame is also noticeably beefier in my estimation.

 

IMG_0956.thumb.JPG.d3d1c40768ca9280f75e49a70be8b4db.JPG

 

Here is a closeup of the safety on the Dakota.  The red dot means it's in the fire position.

 

IMG_0957.thumb.JPG.3dad5079a63f03a3bf95496b84397617.JPG

 

Rotating the pin puts it in the safe position.

 

IMG_0958.thumb.JPG.0fab72745188f0a43045757afc1d0219.JPG

 

That little cutout in the hammer is how the safety works...

 

IMG_0959.thumb.JPG.f717df820354b9cc0e31b08244ba9e4f.JPG

 

When in safe position that little half moon prevents the hammer from falling all the way.  When it's off, it fits in the cut out in the hammer.

IMG_0961.thumb.JPG.1b8e955d804dbf21fbed858f53193d2c.JPG

 

This is the hammer on an Uberti.  That little block of metal falls down and does something unique.

 

IMG_0962.thumb.JPG.237f2cf3fcab0376a7fa3f534ed0cc50.JPG

 

It apparently falls into that hole in the frame when the pistol is on the traditional "safety" notch, or first click, making it physically impossible for the firing pin to contact the primer of a cartridge.  Theoretically, this would allow the safety notch to actually be safe if there were 6 rounds loaded.

 

I think it's ugly.

 

IMG_0964.thumb.JPG.1ee4c5163b1ea319de2b125a45c278b6.JPG

 

And finally, here's the Great Western Revolver.   As you can see, it has a weird hammer.

 

IMG_0965.thumb.JPG.a7d895c93f393851529b12ae47213b97.JPG

 

And that's why.  The firing pin is in the frame.   I have no idea why they did this, or what purpose it serves.

 

So there are some comparisons for you.   Hope they are interesting.

Edited by H. K. Uriah, SASS #74619
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Thanks for all of the info. If I read this all right.......
 

For those that are looking to buy a new, current production revolver that is an accurate reproduction of the original Colt SAA ( 4 click, base pin, firing pin, etc), there are three primary purchasing options:

 

Uberti Old Model

EMF GW II

Cimarron Frontier

Edited by Dirty Dan Dawkins

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

I shot CIMARRON Evil Roy guns for about 1-1/2 years. Switched to USFA’s rodeo’s in 2005 

switched to USFA premiums in 2009 

Just started shooting a new set of premiums this year.

They appear to be very similar to a 2nd gen Colt.   4 clicks, firing pin on hammer,

These have coil hand springs

Great guns if you can find-afford them.

 

 

good luck

 

3GC

 

 

Edited by Three Gun Cole

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Dirty Dan Dawkins said:

Thanks for all of the info. If I read this all right.......
 

For those that are looking to buy a new, current production revolver that is an accurate reproduction of the original Colt SAA ( 4 click, base pin, firing pin, etc), there are three primary purchasing options:

 

Uberti Old Model

EMF GW II

Cimarron Frontier

Based on the highlighted part, no. There are no accurate reproductions 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

this has been an educational read , thanks to all contributors and know ive not only enjoyed but also made notes for future reference for a couple things ive thought i needed to get one day 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So any 4-click Uberti will have firing pin in the hammer? I found a 7 1/2 44-40 locally advertised ad 4 click. Haven’t seen it other than online

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Dirty Dan Dawkins said:

So any 4-click Uberti will have firing pin in the hammer? I found a 7 1/2 44-40 locally advertised ad 4 click. Haven’t seen it other than online

 

Not all, Uberti is still making the black powder frame models/old models with 4 click hammers. Their pre-war/Cattleman II and other new models they come out with have the 3 click retractable firing pin hammer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Could someone post a pic of these three click retractable firing pin Uberti pistols, both cocked and not?   I'd like to see what they look like, as I have never yet seen one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, H. K. Uriah, SASS #74619 said:

Could someone post a pic of these three click retractable firing pin Uberti pistols, both cocked and not?   I'd like to see what they look like, as I have never yet seen one.

 

 

 

  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And what is the disadvantage of this system? Would prefer answers from someone who actually owns one and has experienced shortcomings, or from one of our knowledgeable gun plumbers who can explain the fix.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Goody, SASS #26190 said:

And what is the disadvantage of this system? Would prefer answers from someone who actually owns one and has experienced shortcomings, or from one of our knowledgeable gun plumbers who can explain the fix.

 

@BoomStick Jay has fixed a bunch of them. 

 

I don't feel like I need to own one in this case. I've read here, Facebook, and other sites on the internet that light firing pin strikes is an issue. A secondary issue is the trigger pull is considerably longer and must be held back until the cartridge is fired(which in most cases is the cause of the light strikes).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like a solution in search of a problem.   Based on the video and description, I would not buy one.

Too bad, in my opinion, as Uberti guns before this were, in my experience, pretty good.  That weird block in the safety notch didn't screw up the gun's functionality, and I suppose if you really hated it, it would be easy enough to get rid of with a new hammer.   But this...  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, Dan, here's what you are lookin for:

:D:D:D

 

 

glock-19-gen-5-category-photo.jpg?t=1507

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.