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Alpo

Political correctness run amok

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Y'all remember Linda Cristal? Pretty dark-haired girl played Victoria on High Chaparral?

 

I got to wondering if that was her real name. It seems to me to be taking a big chance to name your baby girl Linda if you are of Spanish descent. You would get teased enough growing up named "beautiful", but what if you were ugly. :o

 

So I looked her up. Wiki says that she is an Argentine-American actress.

 

Her father was French, her mother was Italian, and she was born in Buenos Aires. How does that make her Argentine-AMERICAN?

 

And her birth name was not Linda. Stage name.

 

 

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That is interesting, I just assumed that she was from Mexico.  

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A34D0F97-277D-4ED6-B56F-9B1B20E25266.jpeg

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If she became a naturalized citizen, she would be an American citizen. Since her birthplace was Argentina, arguably that would make her Argentine-American. It's a lot easier to say than "an American citizen of French-Italian ancestry born in Argentina."

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My wife and I are both European-Americans.

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More a My favorite Brazilian-American actress. 

6C13A768-CB47-4FE1-84C8-F0F60D59D0AE.jpeg

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This just goes to show... if you are in your 20s and ugly... you have to work at it.

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3 hours ago, Marshal Mo Hare, SASS #45984 said:

She’s been making American films since the 50s, to me that’s good enough, she might even have gotten citizenship.

If she had become naturalized she would not be an Argentine American. She would be an American.

 

This is right up there with calling Chief Dan George and Jay Silverheels "Native American". They are, or I guess "was" would be more correct since I think they're both dead, Canadian. The Canadian term is First Nation.

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3 hours ago, DocWard said:

It's a lot easier to say than "an American citizen of French-Italian ancestry born in Argentina."

The correct term would be American.

 

The politically correct term would be that gobbledygook you spouted there.

 

I had that explained to me rather clearly a few years ago. I was talking to a young lady I know and I said, "You should know this. You are Chinese." She said, "I am not Chinese. I am American. I have papers to prove it."

 

Yep. Not Chinese any longer. Not Chinese-American. American.

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The word “correct” should be removed from the idiotic phrase “politically correct”.

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2 hours ago, bgavin said:

My wife and I are both European-Americans.

That is the first time I have seen someone claimed that distinction.

 

Several years ago I was researching the first Roundup, at Pendleton. I was looking for some information about George Fletcher. I found a website about negro cowboys.

 

They said that the first Roundup had three competitors for saddle bronc riding.

 

A Native American named Jackson Sundown (I bet if you asked, he would have told you he was a Nez Perce).

 

An African American named George Fletcher.

 

And a European American named John Spain.

 

And I read that, and I thought to myself, "what kind of moron would call someone a European American?"

 

 

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Posted (edited)
56 minutes ago, Alpo said:

The correct term would be American.

 

The politically correct term would be that gobbledygook you spouted there.

 

I had that explained to me rather clearly a few years ago. I was talking to a young lady I know and I said, "You should know this. You are Chinese." She said, "I am not Chinese. I am American. I have papers to prove it."

 

Yep. Not Chinese any longer. Not Chinese-American. American.

 

I tend to agree with you and Teddy Roosevelt on the subject. At the same time, from a genealogical perspective, I am happy and a bit proud to know of my mostly Scots-Irish ancestry, and how it informs who I am today. Perhaps in the case of Linda Cristal,  since she is best known for playing roles as Mexican females, it is relevant to mention that she is actually not Mexican, or even Spanish in her ancestry. At any rate, I think Roosevelt said it best:

 

Quote

There is no room in this country for hyphenated Americanism. When I refer to hyphenated Americans, I do not refer to naturalized Americans. Some of the very best Americans I have ever known were naturalized Americans, Americans born abroad. But a hyphenated American is not an American at all … The one absolutely certain way of bringing this nation to ruin, of preventing all possibility of its continuing to be a nation at all, would be to permit it to become a tangle of squabbling nationalities, an intricate knot of German-Americans, Irish-Americans, English-Americans, French-Americans, Scandinavian-Americans or Italian-Americans, each preserving its separate nationality, each at heart feeling more sympathy with Europeans of that nationality, than with the other citizens of the American Republic … There is no such thing as a hyphenated American who is a good American. The only man who is a good American is the man who is an American and nothing else.

 

Edited by DocWard
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49 minutes ago, Pat Riot, SASS #13748 said:

The word “correct” should be removed from the idiotic phrase “politically correct”.

How about we substitute STUPID for CORRECT?

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I once saw a reporter talking about the African-American population in London. She then interviewed a guy who had been born in Birmingham, and not the Alabama one. Never saw her report any more stories.

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1 hour ago, Badger Mountain Charlie SASS #43172 said:

How about we substitute STUPID for CORRECT?

 

Hear, Hear! 

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2 hours ago, Alpo said:

And I read that, and I thought to myself, "what kind of moron would call someone a European American?"

 


Those who are thumbing their noses at blatant politically correct pandering and class warfare.
We are Americans of European descent and lineage..  same as the black fella is an American of African descent and lineage.

Adding the prefix adds a layer of entitlement.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, bgavin said:


Those who are thumbing their noses at blatant politically correct pandering and class warfare.
We are Americans of European descent and lineage..  same as the black fella is an American of African descent and lineage.

Adding the prefix adds a layer of entitlement.

Some Americans are not of European lineage at all.

If you will excuse the N word......Navajo and Nisei.

;):FlagAm:

A9B96A49-C8E4-49A4-BDB5-A80204CE9956.jpeg

983FCFEE-885F-4EA1-97AD-3D7D9C8CA6B6.jpeg

Edited by Utah Bob #35998
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my dad's family came to these shores just nine years after the Mayflower landed.  Mom's family have been here since 1847.  I was born in Oregon and other than overseas duty have never had a residence outside of here.  I AM A NATIVE AMERICAN.  Note, I didn't say I am an indigenous American but according to Webster's dictionary I AM A NATIVE AMERICAN!  Political correctness be damned!

 

My tribe? Italian, Scots-Irish, English, Welch, Walloon, French, German and a host of others.

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6 minutes ago, Forty Rod SASS 3935 said:

my dad's family came to these shores just nine years after the Mayflower landed.  Mom's family have been here since 1847.  I was born in Oregon and other than overseas duty have never had a residence outside of here.  I AM A NATIVE AMERICAN.  Note, I didn't say I am an indigenous American but according to Webster's dictionary I AM A NATIVE AMERICAN!  Political correctness be damned!

 

My tribe? Italian, Scots-Irish, English, Welch, Walloon, French, German and a host of others.

You sound like me...A Native American Mutt....A whole bunch of different background.....

 

Texas Lizard

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Posted (edited)
37 minutes ago, Utah Bob #35998 said:

Some Americans are not of European lineage at all.

If you will excuse the N word......Navajo and Nisei.

;):FlagAm:

 

 


Sorry, the "we" I intended for "European-Americans" was my wife and myself.
American Indians are not indigenous either.. they just got here before the rest, over the land bridge.

The North American continent is not a cradle of civilization... nobody is truly indigenous, as they all came here from some place else.
That is why I have to laugh so long, and so hard at all the P.C. pandering and special titles.

Take the time to do the DNA studies... they can tell you where your origins are, long term.

Edited by bgavin

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9 minutes ago, Badger Mountain Charlie SASS #43172 said:

Yeah, but where did the GNOMES come from????????

The word comes from Renaissance Latin gnomus, which first appears in the Ex Libro de Nymphis, Sylvanis, Pygmaeis, Salamandris et Gigantibus, etc by Paracelsus, published posthumously in Nysa in 1566 (and again in the Johannes Huser edition of 1589–1591 from an autograph by Paracelsus).[3]

The term may be an original invention of Paracelsus, possibly deriving the term from Latin gēnomos (itself representing a Greek γη-νομος, literally "earth-dweller"). In this case, the omission of the ē is, as the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) calls it, a blunder. Paracelsus uses Gnomi as a synonym of Pygmæi and classifies them as earth elementals. He describes them as two spans high, very reluctant to interact with humans, and able to move through solid earth as easily as humans move through air.[4] The chthonic, or earth-dwelling, spirit has precedents in numerous ancient and medieval mythologies, often guarding mines and precious underground treasures, notably in the Germanic dwarfs and the Greek Chalybes, Telchines or Dactyls.[2]

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2 hours ago, Alpo said:

The word comes from Renaissance Latin gnomus, which first appears in the Ex Libro de Nymphis, Sylvanis, Pygmaeis, Salamandris et Gigantibus, etc by Paracelsus, published posthumously in Nysa in 1566 (and again in the Johannes Huser edition of 1589–1591 from an autograph by Paracelsus).[3]

The term may be an original invention of Paracelsus, possibly deriving the term from Latin gēnomos (itself representing a Greek γη-νομος, literally "earth-dweller"). In this case, the omission of the ē is, as the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) calls it, a blunder. Paracelsus uses Gnomi as a synonym of Pygmæi and classifies them as earth elementals. He describes them as two spans high, very reluctant to interact with humans, and able to move through solid earth as easily as humans move through air.[4] The chthonic, or earth-dwelling, spirit has precedents in numerous ancient and medieval mythologies, often guarding mines and precious underground treasures, notably in the Germanic dwarfs and the Greek Chalybes, Telchines or Dactyls.[2]

That sounds like Badger!  :D

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I think the correct way is to say, for example:

 

I'm an American.... born and raised here...... but I have Italian heritage.  

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Posted (edited)

Apparently it’s important to some people and to some people it’s not.

The End. 
:)

Edited by Utah Bob #35998
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19 hours ago, Texas Lizard said:

You sound like me...A Native American Mutt....A whole bunch of different background.....

 

Texas Lizard

Yep, great grandpa was a travelin' man.  :P

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21 hours ago, Utah Bob #35998 said:

I once saw a reporter talking about the African-American population in London. She then interviewed a guy who had been born in Birmingham, and not the Alabama one. Never saw her report any more stories.

 

Didn't see that one, but I saw a reporterette talking to a black south african and called him an african american south african.  He looked at her like she was an idiot and said "I'm not american". 

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15 minutes ago, Ramblin Gambler said:

 

Didn't see that one, but I saw a reporterette talking to a black south african and called him an african american south african.  He looked at her like she was an idiot and said "I'm not american". 

 

Had a co-worker originally from Rhodesia (before it renamed itself) that would put "African-American" on forms just to screw with people. He was of European descent.:D

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My father’s ancestors came from Europe to the US as children in the 1890’s.  
My father was a Native American.

 

My mother’s ancestors came from Europe to the US in 1620....maybe earlier.  

My mother was a Native American.

 

Me?  I am a Native American.

 

Cat Brules

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19 hours ago, Alpo said:

The word comes from Renaissance Latin gnomus, which first appears in the Ex Libro de Nymphis, Sylvanis, Pygmaeis, Salamandris et Gigantibus, etc by Paracelsus, published posthumously in Nysa in 1566 (and again in the Johannes Huser edition of 1589–1591 from an autograph by Paracelsus).[3]

The term may be an original invention of Paracelsus, possibly deriving the term from Latin gēnomos (itself representing a Greek γη-νομος, literally "earth-dweller"). In this case, the omission of the ē is, as the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) calls it, a blunder. Paracelsus uses Gnomi as a synonym of Pygmæi and classifies them as earth elementals. He describes them as two spans high, very reluctant to interact with humans, and able to move through solid earth as easily as humans move through air.[4] The chthonic, or earth-dwelling, spirit has precedents in numerous ancient and medieval mythologies, often guarding mines and precious underground treasures, notably in the Germanic dwarfs and the Greek Chalybes, Telchines or Dactyls.[2]

 

Alpo, how can you possibly know all this and still have so many questions about everything else?  ;)

 

Angus

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On 4/28/2020 at 11:31 AM, Alpo said:

If she had become naturalized she would not be an Argentine American. She would be an American.

 

This is right up there with calling Chief Dan George and Jay Silverheels "Native American". They are, or I guess "was" would be more correct since I think they're both dead, Canadian. The Canadian term is First Nation.

 

It changed again, we went from "Indians" to "First Nations" and they are now officially "Indigenous People".  Not sure what it will be next week.

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