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Boulder Canyon Bob# 32052L

Depriming problem

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All of a sudden I'm getting primers separating when I deprime my brass. Brass is Starline used, but number of times ,loaded varies, Federal large pistol primers, caliber is 44-40. Out of 100 pieces of brass I got about 15 that this happened on. The sides or anvil stays in the brass and the top is ejected , of course a new primer can't be seated. Hate to just recycle the offending pieces, but thought I'd check and see if anyone else has run into this. 

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Odd. Doesn't usually happen, unless it's crimped military stuff, or old mercuric primers that have corroded.

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Check the depriming pin for a round point. When they get sharp they will do that.

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Bad lot of Federal primers, most likely.  Folks reported having this same problem with some Federal primers a few years ago.

 

You can usually pop the remainder of the primer out of the pocket with a sharp tipped awl.

 

Good luck, GJ

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Well, I thought I was the only person having this issue. Never noticed the separation of the anvil & cup when depriming on 1st stage of the 550 Dillon and dry media tumbling. I now deprime with a universal decapper prior to wet tumbling. Have to hit some primers twice to dislodge the primer parts. The pin is rounded and have tried adjusting the pin depth without any positive result. I believe the primers are seated more firmly & to the bottom of the primer pockets without the usual debris from powder & primers. 

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I didn't get the impression that the anvil and cup were separating (that happens to me all the time and seems normal as they are two separate pieces), I thought BCB meant that the cup was actually coming apart.

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I've used a primer pocket brush and primer pocket reamer in the past to help alleviate that problem . 

 

I've had the opposite problem more recently.  Some of my .38 brass is so old that the primer pockets don't hold the primer firmly.   

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9 hours ago, Boulder Canyon Bob# 32052L said:

 The sides or anvil stays in the brass and the top is ejected , of course a new primer can't be seated. 

 

Bob.. I'm just thinkin ya mean the sides of the cup stays in the brass?? Right??

 

Rance ;)

Just sayin :mellow:

 

 

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Never had this problem until I bought some wet tumbled brass. Looked like new but almost 10% of it was ruined depriming. This was bought from a range. Wet tumbled with primers still in it.

I'll ask for uncleaned next time and pass on their wet tumbled.

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I dry tumble, but I would think that wet tumbling would be best suited to de-primed brass. Specifically to clean the primer pocket.

Thoughts?

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I would take out the stuck pieces, as GJ said with an awl, and then use a reamer to clean out the primer pocket.  I have used a Lyman case prep unit to ream out primer pockets, and it is amazing the amount of crud that comes out.  Now, I use the reamer attached to a RCBS accessory handle instead of the motor driven reamer on the Lyman unit, as it's easier and I don't ream out any brass from the primer pocket.

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►wet tumbling with primers still in will cause this to happen as will very old brass.

 

Once deprimed though, the cases do fine

 

►Some folks say the wet tumbling cleans too much of the carbon out of the primer pocket making it hard to reload new ones.

I just mist them, primer pocket up with some case lube--problem solved.

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Well,

 

I wonder if the condition of the primer pockets depends on the length of wet tumbling. I usually wet tumble about three hours for 45 colt brass. The seating of primers since beginning wet tumbling is very positive and I never a high primer on my 550. Prior to wet tumbling the feel when priming was inconsistent and primers were not set as deep in the pocket unless I occasionally cleaned the pockets manually to remove powder & primer residues.

 

PS I reload with Trail Boss powder, 6.1gr & 200gr RNFP bullet with a good crimp.

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20 minutes ago, Cheyenne Ranger, 48747L said:

►Some folks say the wet tumbling cleans too much of the carbon out of the primer pocket making it hard to reload new ones.

That doesn't make much sense; what about new brass?

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1 hour ago, Cheyenne Ranger, 48747L said:

►Some folks say the wet tumbling cleans too much of the carbon out of the primer pocket making it hard to reload new ones.

 

Those 'folks' are idiots.......;)

BTW-Put'n lube in the p'pocket is pretty 'dum' also. :huh:

Sooner or later, it will cause a FTF.

OLG

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7 hours ago, Rance - SASS # 54090 said:

 

Bob.. I'm just thinkin ya mean the sides of the cup stays in the brass?? Right??

 

Rance ;)

Just sayin :mellow:

 

 

Yeah, sorry for my calling it the wrong name.

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5 hours ago, Tex Jones, SASS 2263 said:

I would take out the stuck pieces, as GJ said with an awl, and then use a reamer to clean out the primer pocket.  I have used a Lyman case prep unit to ream out primer pockets, and it is amazing the amount of crud that comes out.  Now, I use the reamer attached to a RCBS accessory handle instead of the motor driven reamer on the Lyman unit, as it's easier and I don't ream out any brass from the primer pocket.

I briefly tried to pick out the stuck pieces to no avail. I then put them back in the tumbler for 3 hours thinking it might clean them out, still no joy. I tried using a hand held primer pocket reamer, but that made no difference. It's like they're glued in somehow. Gonna set them aside for some time when I have more patience (Yeah like that'll ever happen). Thanks for the responses.

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Guest Texas jack Black SASS#9362
8 hours ago, TN Mongo, SASS #61450 said:

I've used a primer pocket brush and primer pocket reamer in the past to help alleviate that problem . 

 

I've had the opposite problem more recently.  Some of my .38 brass is so old that the primer pockets don't hold the primer firmly.   

Glue them in. :D

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Did you oven dry cases or let air dry. The latter can cause corrosion & possibly cause primer cup to stick to pocket walls.

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5 hours ago, Boulder Canyon Bob# 32052L said:

briefly tried to pick out the stuck pieces to no avail.

 

Then break out your broken screw extractor of the right size (even if you have to grind the tip off one) and extract the brass shell of the partial primer!

 

Good luck, GJ

 

 

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.38 cases are pennies and most of us have thousands; unless you're having this problem on hundreds of cases, chuck em! Not worth it.

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17 hours ago, The Original Lumpy Gritz said:

Do you wet tumble before repriming?

OLG

No, I wet tumble, then deprime and reload.

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1 hour ago, Yusta B. said:

Did you oven dry cases or let air dry. The latter can cause corrosion & possibly cause primer cup to stick to pocket walls.

I let them air dry. I've done this for a couple of years and this is the first time it happened. My have to send the wife out while I dry them in the oven. When we were racing motorcycles she'd come home and I would have sheets of Lexan in the oven making windscreens for motorcycle fairings 

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Any chance these particular cases were sitting around for a lot longer than normal after tumbling? Were they loaded with BP ?

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Bob - you have received many suggestions why but not these two:

1. The full length sizing/depriming die in the 44-40 die set is not properly adjusted per the instruction sheet

2.  Buy  a Lee Universal decapping die. It will deprime any caliber up to 50 caliber.  This is they only decapper die I use and have never had anvils still in the pocket.  In my case probably 75,000 or more including 44 WCF's

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2 hours ago, Yusta B. said:

Any chance these particular cases were sitting around for a lot longer than normal after tumbling? Were they loaded with BP ?

That could be, I had some that got left in my wet tumbler for quite a while while I recovered from rotator cuff surgery. Those may have been in there. The more I think about it the more likely that sounds. Thanks

2 hours ago, John Boy said:

Bob - you have received many suggestions why but not these two:

1. The full length sizing/depriming die in the 44-40 die set is not properly adjusted per the instruction sheet

2.  Buy  a Lee Universal decapping die. It will deprime any caliber up to 50 caliber.  This is they only decapper die I use and have never had anvils still in the pocket.  In my case probably 75,000 or more including 44 WCF's

Thanks for the tip. 

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13 hours ago, Boulder Canyon Bob# 32052L said:

No, I wet tumble, then deprime and reload.

Deprime first.

The solution is 'gluing' the primers to the case.

OLG

 

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15 minutes ago, The Original Lumpy Gritz said:

Deprime first.

The solution is 'gluing' the primers to the case.

OLG

 

I assume you're referring to the liquid (solution) in the tumbler as opposed to an answer to the problem (gluing)? I'm not the brightest light in the harbor and had to read that a few times!  ^_^

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3 minutes ago, Abilene Slim SASS 81783 said:

I assume you're referring to the liquid (solution) in the tumbler as opposed to an answer to the problem (gluing)? I'm not the brightest light in the harbor and had to read that a few times!  ^_^

YES-the tumblers solution.

And even more so if it has 'hard-water' in the solution.

OLG

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Guest Texas jack Black SASS#9362

29 replies and 504 views in order to solve a problem that does not exist. If just a few cases chuck them out, if many try a new batch of primers and go shoot Spring has arrived.:D :FlagAm:

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18 hours ago, Boulder Canyon Bob# 32052L said:

No, I wet tumble, then deprime and reload.

 

When I did that I had problems with FTF, but the cases may not have been dried enough.  Now I de-prime first then wet tumble, after that my OCD kicks in.  First I get all the pins out then I blow compressed air into every case to make sure it's dry.  After that I let them sit out in the shop for a couple of days and spray a little case lube on them before put them away.  BTW this is for .45LC. 

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I dry mine in an old fruit dehydrator. Takes about an hour.

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Guest Texas jack Black SASS#9362

Corncob media  deprime ,prime ,load and go shooting. They can be a bit dirty.   I do not waste precious time making them pretty. :FlagAm:

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3 hours ago, Tequila Chase said:

 

When I did that I had problems with FTF, but the cases may not have been dried enough.  Now I de-prime first then wet tumble, after that my OCD kicks in.  First I get all the pins out then I blow compressed air into every case to make sure it's dry.  After that I let them sit out in the shop for a couple of days and spray a little case lube on them before put them away.  BTW this is for .45LC. 

10 minutes in a walnut shell dry tumbler  will dry your cases.

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