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Brooklyn Slim

Baikal vs Stoeger Shotguns

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Looking to buy a Coach Gun. Is there any real difference between a Stoeger or a Baikal once they've been slicked up by a good smith?

 

As always, appreciate any input or advice.

 

B Slim

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Yep. Baikals are usually able to give quite a bit longer service than Stoegers, for folks who run their shotgun fast. Lots of folks share that experience. The Baikal is just built out of better, heavier steel.

 

Either work well if you shoot in the "not so fast" category.

 

The weak spot for Baikals - the ribs on barrels sometimes are not soldered well. The weak spot for Stoegers - the forearm lug is easily detached.

 

Both will need good gunsmithing before they are fun to shoot.

 

To get "real" difference, step up to an SKB/Ithaca!

 

Good luck, GJ

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Yep. Baikals are usually able to give quite a bit longer service than Stoegers, for folks who run their shotgun fast. Lots of folks share that experience. The Baikal is just built out of better, heavier steel.

 

Either work well if you shoot in the "not so fast" category.

 

The weak spot for Baikals - the ribs on barrels sometimes are not soldered well. The weak spot for Stoegers - the forearm lug is easily detached.

 

Both will need good gunsmithing before they are fun to shoot.

 

To get "real" difference, step up to an SKB/Ithaca!

 

Good luck, GJ

 

 

Joe covered everything I have experienced.

 

I broke 3 Stoegers in my first year, the 1st one I bought used, but the other 2 were bought brand new and tuned. I went to the Baikal (on RRR's advise) and it's been an awesome shotgun, I still love it. It's built like a tank and it works great. I shot it for 5 years, averaging 4 matches a month with zero problems. I had bought a 2nd Baikal as a back-up about 6 months after I got the 1st one. I shot 4 rounds through it, put it in the safe, and I never shot it again since the 1st one is just so reliable. I just sold it a few months back.

 

I'd still be shooting the Baikal, but I now have a really, really, pretty Silver Coin SKB :wub: and the Baikal is now the back-up.

 

Just to add. I don't shoot the SKB because it's any better or faster than the Baikal (it maybe even slower on real close targets due to the trigger re-set). I choose to shoot it over the Baikal because even thoe the timer doesn't show it I feel I'm more consistant with the SKB. Also, did I mention that the SKB is really really pretty?

 

If your not looking to spend the money on the SKB or a Browning then buy the Baikal. You won't be disappointed.

 

JEL

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I'm still usin' the Stoeger Coachgun I bought new in 1986. The ONLY two things that have bewn done are disabling the "auto" safety feature and slickin' up the chambers and relieving the forcing cones. Same with my 26" Uplander Stoeger. Minimal work. I think you can oversmith a gun. Spend the money on ammo practicin' yer technique, then think about gunsmithin'. You might find it ain't needed. I ain't slow 'cause of my shotgun. I'm slow cause I stop shootin' and talk durin' a run!

 

I couldn't tell ya about a Baikal.

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Have had both.

Still shoot the Baikal if that tells ya anything.

 

 

Mine was done by Gunslinger and it runs pretty darn good.

Like the SKB better. But wife shoots that and I don't have the $1,200 bucks for another one.

So I went back to the Baikal. I prefer the double trigger anyway.

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My son and I both shoot Stoegers .

We have shot the same guns now for 4 years,with,

NO brake downs :blink:

I am very Happy with my Stoegers .

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I find I can shoot the Baikal faster because of the design of the extracter. The Stoeger has the bottom half of the hourglass, and sometimes the crimp of the shell can get hung up on the top or it if you don't hit the holes right. The Baikal starts with a full hourglass extracter, and let Gunslinger work it over. If you get the shells anywhere near the gun they go in perfect.

 

Just my opinion, but he sells them ready to go and they are faaaaaaast!! :)

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I'll stand by my Stoeger 12 gauge Coach Gun, It's been

a great gun and I've been using it for 5 years now.

Yes, I'm looking for a spare for back-up just in case.

Happy trails

QDG

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It's generally accepted that a Baikol is a somewhat stronger and better made gun than the Stoegers.

 

However I have a 2-1/2 year old Stoeger with single trigger that has operated flawlessly since purchased, and I have no reservations about it's performance. I of course slicked it up and made it CAS friendly when new, but I am totally satisfyied with it's performance. I have another Stoeger that I picked up used with double triggers that works perfectly also.

 

Judging from what I see at the matches, and I attend three every month, the Stoegers outnumber all others that I see being used. However,that may not hold true everywhere.

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I have been shooting a Model 97 for the last three years.This last weekend I shot a Stoeger double trigger for the first time. I liked it but it did a number on my middle finger with the trigger guard recoiling back against it. Is this common? I'm thinking it may have been the length of pull was wrong. Any suggestions?

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I have been shooting a Model 97 for the last three years.This last weekend I shot a Stoeger double trigger for the first time. I liked it but it did a number on my middle finger with the trigger guard recoiling back against it. Is this common? I'm thinking it may have been the length of pull was wrong. Any suggestions?

 

Yeah, you are not holding the gun tightly enough against your shoulder. Doubles kick like a mule when you don't snug them up on your shoulder, and as it travels back, the trigger guard whacks the middle finger for extra emphasis.

 

A 97 with the much straighter stock doesn't recoil the same way.

 

Folks can shoot the double painlessly even with a short stock, once they learn to control the recoil properly.

 

Good luck, GJ

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I started with a Stoeger and now use a Baikal. Interestingly, my wife prefers the Stoeger and still uses it. She has a hard time reaching the lever on the Baikal; the grip is shaped differently between the two with the Stoeger grip being closer to the lever.

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My wife and may others found that the design and weight of the Stoeger gives a different recoil compared to the Baikal. Even with both fully fitted and decked out with recoil pads, recoil reducers, etc. The Baikal seems to recoil more into the shoulder while the Stoeger has more of an upward twist that bothers some folks.

 

Many enjoy their Stoegers and have shot them successfully for several years. With a good tune up, they generally last quite well - if the hammer springs are not lightened too much and are allowed to act as shock absorbers as was designed.

 

But whenever I see someone having trouble handing the SxS recoil, I check to see if it is a Stoeger and then let them try one of our Baikals to see if it helps them. Sometimes it does.

 

Of course, the 97 is often the better option for those who are recoil sensitive.

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I have an almost brand new Stoeger that will not shoot the right barl, has been through the hands of two smiths and the best work I can tell they done was the nice bills that came back with the gun! On the Baikal, it works well, hasnt been to a gunsmith yet :wacko: My biggest complaint on the Baikal, and I have heard it from others also, is that it wraps the back of the birdy finger of some shooters when fired, It is enough of a wrap that it raises a knot on the back on my finger. Both guns seem to feel heavier and chunkier than the old Liberty or Rossi doubles I have handled BUT their control operations are more ergonomic and this is more important. I am sure it would be expensive to have done but both guns would benefit from some wood removal and/or reshaping.

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I have an almost brand new Stoeger that will not shoot the right barl, has been through the hands of two smiths and the best work I can tell they done was the nice bills that came back with the gun! On the Baikal, it works well, hasnt been to a gunsmith yet :wacko: My biggest complaint on the Baikal, and I have heard it from others also, is that it wraps the back of the birdy finger of some shooters when fired, It is enough of a wrap that it raises a knot on the back on my finger. Both guns seem to feel heavier and chunkier than the old Liberty or Rossi doubles I have handled BUT their control operations are more ergonomic and this is more important. I am sure it would be expensive to have done but both guns would benefit from some wood removal and/or reshaping.

I had the same problem with my Baikal. I put a little 3/8 inch tubing on the back of the trigger guard, held the gun more firmly against my shoulder and the problem went away.

 

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I have an almost brand new Stoeger that will not shoot the right barl, has been through the hands of two smiths and the best work I can tell they done was the nice bills that came back with the gun! On the Baikal, it works well, hasnt been to a gunsmith yet :wacko: My biggest complaint on the Baikal, and I have heard it from others also, is that it wraps the back of the birdy finger of some shooters when fired, It is enough of a wrap that it raises a knot on the back on my finger. Both guns seem to feel heavier and chunkier than the old Liberty or Rossi doubles I have handled BUT their control operations are more ergonomic and this is more important. I am sure it would be expensive to have done but both guns would benefit from some wood removal and/or reshaping.

 

 

I had a Stoeger that did the same thing.Left barrel worked all day,but the right wouldn't fire.What my gunsmith found was the inside of the stock needed a small amount of wood removed so the right barrel would cock.

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Stoegers suck...and you pay more for 'em too!!

 

:mellow:

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Got a Stoeger that I bought in 1997. Have shot multiple/multiple thousands of rounds thru it.

No has ever accused me of being gentle with it or very slow with it. Switched the triggers about 10 or so years ago.

Bought another for back-up about 1998 or '99 and have never had reason to use it.

Have an SKB, but I'm faster with the 2 trigger gun. Have 3 '97's but again faster with SxS.

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I've been shooting my Stoger for 12 years opens itself. I seem to win speed double at some of the major shoots this year. Works for me.

Jesamy

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I've been shooting my Stoger for 12 years opens itself. I seem to win speed double at some of the major shoots this year. Works for me.

Jesamy

 

Really?

 

Which ones?

 

And what do you mean "Opens itself"?

 

Phantom

:FlagAm:

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"Opens itself"... if like mine, quick push on the lever, barrels drop like they're spring loaded. Phantom, if by "suck", you mean they're ugly... you're right... but the Baikal ain't winnin' any beauty contests either...

 

My real take on the OP? After reading all the responses so far... you pays your money, and you takes your chances.

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I love my Stoegers .

I never had a issue with ether one .

And Beauty is in the eye of the beer holder ! :lol:

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I love my stoeger. box stock and fast as I need it to be. When I'm not fumbling I shoot it much faster than my 97. And I've won speed match with my 97

Tried a baikal didnt care for the shape of the triggers.

 

You couldnt pay me to shoot a single trigger sxs shotgun.

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My real take on the OP? After reading all the responses so far... you pays your money, and you takes your chances.

 

Well lets sum up the posts so far.

 

You have people who like and dislike Stoegers for various reasons and no complaints with the Baikal's performance.

 

Problems listed with the Baikal, recoil (really??), and a pinched finger issue that can be solved with .34 cents of rubber tubing, and very rarely a bad soldering of the barrels.

 

Problems with the Stoeger (which sounds like a large number of them from the amount of posts complaining of them) Both barrels don't fire consistantly, Shotgun opens when fired, Barrel lugs are weak. (Which BTW I have had at least 1 of these 3 issues with each one of the 3 Stoeger's I have owned. All were all "tuned" by the best gunsmiths talked about on the wire 2 were returned several times)

 

Stoegers cost more than the Baikal.

 

Huh?? Which gun would I choose if I were looking to buy my first shotgun for SASS today?? :wacko::wacko: One that is hit or miss on performance and more expensive or one that is solid and costs less. YMMV but I'll keep my Baikal you can keep your Stoeger ;)

 

JEL

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. YMMV but I'll keep my Baikal you can keep your Stoeger ;)

 

JEL

 

Thanks :D

 

GG ~ :FlagAm:

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Really?

 

Which ones?

 

And what do you mean "Opens itself"?

 

Phantom

:FlagAm:

Smoothed and polished out all of the locking parts and lightened the latch spring.

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The gunsmith, who fixed my Stoeger, that had several of the problems mentioned, said he feel the Baikal was a better gun. I like the Stoeger and have not had any problems since he worked on it. That being said my next shotgun will be a Baikal.

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Smoothed and polished out all of the locking parts and lightened the latch spring.

 

So it doesn't "Open itself".

 

It just does what every other sxs does once it's been cleaned up...got it.

 

:FlagAm:

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So it doesn't "Open itself".

 

It just does what every other sxs does once it's been cleaned up...got it.

 

:FlagAm:

 

 

+1

Thought when he said that, that it opened up when he shot it.

 

Have seen that before and thought that is what he was talkikng about.

Any good slicked up sxs should do what he is talking about. No matter what brand it is.

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I thought a tuned Stoeger was supposed to open after the first shot. There are shooters that hold the Stoegers closed and just let them flop open for their reload. My first Stoeger lasted about 5 years, when it started opening after the first shot, firing both barrels at once, failing to fire, stock cracking, etc. I decided to replace it. The steel in my replacement Stoegers was soft and they lasted about six months each. The Baikals do have better metal. Just my experience, and I use to shoot 20-30 matches a year for many years. I have a plethera of worn out 97's also.

 

My SKB is holding up and was well worth the $700.00, the price of two Stoegers or Baikals.

 

Winning a speed event proves nothing in regards to the reliability of a shotgun!

 

LL'

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