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A Message From The President of Federal, et al.


DocWard

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10 minutes ago, Joke 'um said:

Guess I'll quit looking for their clandestine warehouse.  Or, maybe that what he wants me to do?

I think he blinked rapidly when talking about this so therefore, yes, he must. Go forth on your quest. Report back later...which we know you won’t do therefore we will have someone watch you...but if you find it our watcher might just side with you on keeping it secret so therefore, we must have a watcher to watch our first watcher...but we are so paranoid we have a very limited number of people we trust that this is going to get difficult fast...when I say “we” I am stating it in the “Royal manner”. “We” may mean me except when it doesn’t. 
 

 

 

:P

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Well . . . . It would appear, Remington # 10 Caps aren't tied to the current difficulties "Remington" is having.  Must be Patient.  Must be Patient.  Must be Patient.  Must be . . . . . . . . . .

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I was surprised the CEO started out so testy, especially since this was a staged and orchestrated taping.

He is the CEO of a booming company with a huge backlog of orders for product.
He is paying his people overtime rates to bust their butts and turn out product.
Nobody is going hungry or out of work.

Yet the CEO of this company says his people are butt hurt and demoralized over comments from the tin-foil hat crowd.
A perspective adjustment is needed...

The pandemic has closed down many businesses, and their employees are not earning.
Payments are not being made, vehicles are repossessed, houses are foreclosed.
Ammunition employees are fully employed, working hard and making money.
I was somewhat stunned by the volume of ammunition required just to service the April count of new shooters.

Free Market 101 in play lets the CEO charge a premium for his product.
Price Gouging 101 at the retail level (might) be in play as well.
Those willing to pay $0.30 per round for 22LR are welcome to do so.

As to components, I figure the CEO is putting everything he makes, into loaded ammunition.
 

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3 hours ago, Marshal Mo Hare, SASS #45984 said:

“You don’t have to believe everything that goes out on the Internet.”

 

Heresy!

Now, wait a minute.  Abraham Lincoln said the internet couldn't be trusted with the total truth.  Harry Truman said much the same thing.  I know both of those are true because I read it on the internet.

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3 hours ago, Marshal Mo Hare, SASS #45984 said:

“You don’t have to believe everything that goes out on the Internet.”

 

Heresy!

I salute him for his statement. However I am very disappointed that he says not to believe everything on the internet. 

Shirley, he makes jest! It is all true. True I say. :blink:

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22 minutes ago, Forty Rod SASS 3935 said:

Yep, but I know people who won't believe it.

 

Funny though; everybody saw how panic buying drove toilet paper, sanitizer, and a whole lot of stuff off the shelves. And even a 10 or 15% increase in demand emptied stores of bicycles, tents, kayaks, and numerous other outdoor recreational products during the summer. And try to buy household appliances. Whole bunch of other examples: Supply and demand.

But with ammo-- it must be a conspiracy....

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1 hour ago, bgavin said:

I was surprised the CEO started out so testy, especially since this was a staged and orchestrated taping.

He is the CEO of a booming company with a huge backlog of orders for product.
He is paying his people overtime rates to bust their butts and turn out product.
Nobody is going hungry or out of work.

Yet the CEO of this company says his people are butt hurt and demoralized over comments from the tin-foil hat crowd.
A perspective adjustment is needed...

The pandemic has closed down many businesses, and their employees are not earning.
Payments are not being made, vehicles are repossessed, houses are foreclosed.
Ammunition employees are fully employed, working hard and making money.
I was somewhat stunned by the volume of ammunition required just to service the April count of new shooters.

Free Market 101 in play lets the CEO charge a premium for his product.
Price Gouging 101 at the retail level (might) be in play as well.
Those willing to pay $0.30 per round for 22LR are welcome to do so.

As to components, I figure the CEO is putting everything he makes, into loaded ammunition.
 

 

Testy? Butt hurt? I didn't consider that to be particularly testy, considering they are receiving hate mail and have people showing up at their factory. I consider those actions to be more than mere "comments." My guess is they aren't being at all polite about it when they mail the company and show up there. At this point, he and his employees are likely feeling attacked by some of the very people they are trying to make product for. I am confident I would be considerably more testy than he is if that were the case. I also didn't hear him suggest that he or his employees were "butt hurt."  He did at one point say they were trying to keep everyone motivated, which to me is a far different thing. A drop in motivation can come from long hours, trying to keep up with demand, and more.

So, you tell me: When, in your opinion, should Mr. Vanderbrink and his employees be allowed to be "testy,"  frustrated, or heaven forbid, butt hurt by the actions of the madding crowd? When they go beyond hate mail and showing up at the factory and actually start picketing? When they start blocking ingress and egress from the factory? When they start making overt threats? When they start doing actual harm? What do you consider a bridge too far in this scenario? As far as I'm concerned, we involved in firearms, whether as hobbyists or within the industry, have a duty to quell rumors and the like before they become a problem. If we don't do so when we have the opportunity, we are a part of the problem.

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His message kinda reminds me of jobs I have had in the past. i worked for Tyson at a chicken processing plant. We processed about 3,000,000 chickens a week and our sister plant down the road processed about 3,500,000 chickens a week. PETA and other groups were always complaining about how we treated the birds and posting videos and sending hate mail. These same people complain to no end when there is not any food on the shelves to buy at the store.

 

I never realized just how much chicken was processed in a week by food companies to feed people. I think there are 12 chicken process plants owned by Tyson and if all of the run about 3,000,000 birds a week then you processed 36 million birds a week. This is just one company as I asked google for chicken processing companies and it list 12 more companies. If Tyson ( the biggest) process 36 million birds a week, what would be the total in a week for all companies?  if all of them processed the same amount of birds a week, that would be 432 million birds a week. That is a lot of chicken and where would you get that many birds each week? The numbers for cattle and hogs may not be as high, but do you get the picture? There are a lot of people to feed in the world.

 

Ammo is the same way right now. High demand and limited production. If the companies invested in new equipment to meet the demand and it goes back down to lower levels, will the companies go broke because of the drop in demand?  These are tough question right now and we have to be patience to see how things turn out.

 

However, after sitting at home for 9 months with no job and no income, I ran out of patience  a while back. I have survived this so far better that others, but I am looking forward to life returning to something closer to normal soon.

 

Maddog McCoy 

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It's all just supply and demand, the conspiracy theorists aside. Seen it before, after Sandy Hook, seen it recently with toilet paper, hand sanitizer, and other products. I remember a run and shortage of toilet paper in the 70's due to rumors. 

 

Firearms and ammunition are even more susceptible to runs and panic buying as the industry is smaller and more specialized than say the food or paper products industry. The firearms and ammunition industries can't scale up as easily and they are under constant threat from politicians and activists. Worldwide firearms and ammunition are typically even more regulated and restricted than in this country (though they are over regulated here too in my opinion). Such being the case there isn't a huge worldwide capacity to make up the supply when demand in this country increases due to panic, new shooters, and politics. 

 

Took almost 2 to 3 years for the last great shortage to end and for things to return to normal with firearms and ammuniton. I don't expect this time will be any different. 

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1 hour ago, Maddog McCoy SASS #5672 said:

Ammo is the same way right now. High demand and limited production. If the companies invested in new equipment to meet the demand and it goes back down to lower levels, will the companies go broke because of the drop in demand?  These are tough question right now and we have to be patience to see how things turn out.

If not bankrupt, at least financially damaged. It isn't just the actual presses, it is the square footage (building), the manufacturing machines, the conveyor/roller systems, forklifts, and so much more; and it takes 15 to 20 years to pay off those investments. If, in a year or two after they get put into production (which can take a year or two), they are no longer needed, they still need to be paid for.

 

What we can expect is some investment in new higher volume machines in preparation for taking older equipment off line. And then a few workers will no longer be needed. This is usually managed through normal attrition (the usual quitting and retirement). But those workers will not be replaced.

 

This last from an ammunition production analysis about a year ago. Now we have a spike in demand. To the extent materials and staffing are available, all equipment at all plants is running all shifts. Anything put in the pipeline does not "stick," it flushes right through to fill demand.

 

And from another paper (based on investor briefings), Federal will not ship primers to consumers or re-manufacturers until they are able to build every possible round for which there are orders.

 

Now pause and consider this last part... Federal is building every possible round itself rather than ship primers to other companies which were building rounds before. No conspiracy, it is good business. Running 3 shifts and using every available machine, ammo is more profitable than primers. And since re-manufacturers are not getting primers, as 

Federal can build rounds with them... even more orders are going to Federal. Or any Vista company.

 

I don't see a conspiracy, I see good business practices. But is is disruptive to many companies, not just us who want our own personal CAS rounds.

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1 hour ago, Badger Mountain Charlie SASS #43172 said:

Shirley U. Jest. Famous Woman.

 

Her married name is Cantbeserious

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i always believe what i see with my eyes and hold in my hand - i need small pistol primers , ill give him the benefit of the doubt for a bit yet tho , 

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