Jump to content

Annealing


Chief Rick
 Share

Recommended Posts

So as not to sidetrack the the other topic referencing annealing 45 Colt cases:

 

How do "YOU" do it?

 

Of course pictures would help with the description if you care to take the time, especially if using a special contraption you built to do it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I haven't used it yet but after researching this topic I bought an Annealeez machine.  Just got it in the mail. I bought it for 45 cases and for my black powder cartridge long range rifle cases.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree that annealing will reduce blow by significantly. However, if you’re annealing for smokeless powder, then try a small batch first to make sure you like it.

 

I anneal for my 38’s to seal up for my APP load and it works great.  I tried it once in my 45C with a TB load and didn’t like the added resistance to extract the spent round. 
 

I haven’t tried it with a 45C APP load yet.  My gut tells me it would works great because it works in the 38’s.

 

YouTube has a fair amount of diy videos to make your own annealing machine if you don’t want to purchase one.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have used this system and it works for me with 45 colt loads using smokeless and black powder loads having 600-800 fps loads. Cuts down a lot of the blow back.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm cheap seats on this one.  I learned to do it with a Socket with a bolt thru it.  Chuck it up in a variable speed cordless drill motor and hold it in the torch flame for the time I have figured out.  As often as I don't anneal, an Annealeez machine would just be a waste of money.

 

Understand, the way I do it is skull numbing boring but I have annealed enough for each cartridge (Straight Wall Pistol) I've only had to do it once per cartridge.  It works superbly for Rifle, but extraction can be difficult for pistol and I don't recommend annealing for Pistol.  The Blow-By problem is only a big deal for straight wall pistol cartridges in rifles (My Opine).

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I use a empty Sardine can. (pie tin or just about any metal pan would work). I put in water just deep enough so it would cover the case of the cartridge I am annealing when the case is lying down on it's side. I then stand a few cases up in the can, not too many, you want all of them to be able to fall over into the water and be covered. I use a torch on the mouth of the case until I get a very dull red showing. Then just bump/move the Sardine can so that all cases tip over into the water. Cheap, easy and it works great.

 

Snakebite

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, The Original Lumpy Gritz said:

Water serves no purpose with nonferrous metals

 

True but it does prevent the residual heat from traveling down the case and making the head too soft.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

50 minutes ago, Cheyenne Ranger, 48747L said:

built my own

 

p1010075a.jpg.2a7516c2cbe287b0f9f1501e78a95bcc.jpgp1010076a.jpg.32074bda8964dab98a3cedc129d71a2d.jpg

Where did you find plans? Nice job.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In the 50 or so years I’ve been reloading, I never found the need to anneal pistol brass.  But I read an article in one of the gun magazines that gave a simple way to do it.  Stand your brass up in a flat pan with about 1/2” or so water, heat the case mouth to red and with the end of the torch knock them over into the water.

 

the water is to keep the base from losing its strength.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, The Original Lumpy Gritz said:

Water serves no purpose with nonferrous metals

The purpose of setting them in water is to keep the heat at the top of the case, and then kick them over so they cool down and you can do some more. It is not to set the hardness. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

55 minutes ago, Snakebite said:

The purpose of setting them in water is to keep the heat at the top of the case, and then kick them over so they cool down and you can do some more. It is not to set the hardness. 

Takes 700+* to anneal brass.

The metal will change color before that temperature is reached.

I can see were handgun brass is more of a concern here.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, The Original Lumpy Gritz said:

Water serves no purpose with nonferrous metals

makes them cooler when I pick them up so   . . . .

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.