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Safety glasses - why we wear them


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Just a reminder why we wear safety glasses:

This past Saturday while timing for a shooter, a significant portion of his bullet came back and hit my prescription safety glasses so hard it knocked the lens out.  The screw was nowhere to be found, but the glasses were repairable without any permanent damage.  My soft tissue wouldn’t have fared as well.

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I had a similar incident several years ago spotting for another shooter - the major part of the bullet came straight back off the target, over his shoulder, and hit the lower part of my Wiley X shooting glasses. The side of my face was swollen up the next day, and I had a black eye, but no permanent damage. 

 

I'm of the mind that safety equipment that takes a shock or blow, such as a safety harness tether, child safety seat, AND ballistic shooting glasses, should go in the trash and be replaced.

Edited by Three Foot Johnson
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Yikes!  I'm glad you're okay. 

 

A few years ago, a fellow shooter had sliver of a ricochet come back and hit his eye between the lens and the side piece of his glasses.  They were able to remove the piece of lead without any damage to his eye.  A number of us ordered plastic side pieces to slip on our prescription glasses after that.  I won't shoot without wearing them.

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Best teaching moment I've had on a range...

Had a number of different guns and was introducing a young nurse that wanted to learn to shoot to the various calibers.  We had previously been out a few times with 22's.  We had a number of targets out aside from paper, including a few bowling pins.  I shot at one of the bowling pins with a 20ga with birdshot (not a bright idea) and one pellet came right back at me and pegged me on the cheek right under my glasses.  I felt the blood start running down by cheek before I could clear the gun and set it down.  I turned to her, pointed at the blood dripping down my cheek and said loud enough for others on the range to hear me "This is why we always wear shooting glasses".

 

Love that girl, she thought the 20ga was underpowered and preferred my old school Rem 870 in 12ga.  Was a sight to behold, this skinny little blond leaning into that shotgun and sending lead downrange.  She went out that week and bought her own 870.

Edited by Crazy Gun Barney, SASS #2428
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38 minutes ago, Three Foot Johnson said:

I've of the mind that safety equipment that takes a shock or blow, such as a safety harness tether, child safety seat, or ballistic shooting glasses, should go in the trash and be replaced.

 

Ask any OEM and they will tell you the same thing.

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16 hours ago, TN Mongo, SASS #61450 said:

Yikes!  I'm glad you're okay. 

 

A few years ago, a fellow shooter had sliver of a ricochet come back and hit his eye between the lens and the side piece of his glasses.  They were able to remove the piece of lead without any damage to his eye.  A number of us ordered plastic side pieces to slip on our prescription glasses after that.  I won't shoot without wearing them.

 

Unless the lenses in your prescription glasses are ballistic impact rated they are little better than wearing nothing at all.

 

Way too many shooters are under the mistaken belief that wearing regular prescription glasses will protect their eyes. The truth is they don't unless they are ANSI Z71 ANSI 87.1+ rated

Edited by Sedalia Dave
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Just got my Wyle X Romers this spring. Still getting used to having a different script in each lens, but it's nice to have a clear front sight. They don't work for long distance however as the target is so out of focus I can't see it. CAS distances are excellent though.

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4 hours ago, Sedalia Dave said:

 

Unless the lenses in your prescription glasses are ballistic impact rated they are little better than wearing nothing at all.

 

Way too many shooters are under the mistaken belief that wearing regular prescription glasses will protect their eyes. The truth is they don't unless they are ANSI Z71+ rated

This is it right here. Prescription glasses mean nothing without the Z rating and the little slip on side shields are laughable. They are great for keeping chips out when working on a lathe but not so great on ricochet bullets.

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I'm fortunate not to need prescription glasses.  (Only thing not wearing out.) But I wear safety glasses that wrap around.  One of the first matches I shot, I was shooting and was stuck in the nose by splatter from another posse with an empty stage between.  It drew blood.  Another inch and.... I've since had splatter bounce off my glasses.

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I agree that Z rated glasses are the best.  When I bird hunted (and didn't need glasses) I always wore quality wrap-around shooting glasses.  Today I no longer bird hunt and I now need prescription progressive lenses.  

 

The truth is most of our shooters are not going to spend the money to acquire Z rated prescription glasses.  The vast majority of the stuff we deal with is low velocity splash backMy regular prescription glasses, and "laughable" side shields, have successfully blocked splash back that would have struck my eyes multiple times and I will continue to wear them.  Now if someone shoots me directly in the face with an ounce of 7 1/2, I'm going to regret not having worn better prescription shooting glasses. 

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I've always worn Z71 wraparound glasses when shooting SASS. Matter of fact, I wear the same in sunglasses also, although the ones I wear shooting are clear lensed. Over the last 25 years of SASS, I've cut or picked enough lead out of me to probably make 10 - .38 spl 158 grainers.

 

Once your eyesight is gone...it's gone. There is no repairing or replacing it.

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8 hours ago, Sedalia Dave said:

 

Unless the lenses in your prescription glasses are ballistic impact rated they are little better than wearing nothing at all.

 

Way too many shooters are under the mistaken belief that wearing regular prescription glasses will protect their eyes. The truth is they don't unless they are ANSI Z71+ rated

 

I can find ANSI Z87+ certified and MIL-PRF 32432 rated glasses, are they ok?

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(right thread this time, I think)

 

I used to be okay with ANSI, but after doing a little research I'll only wear wrap-around MILSPEC rated ballistic lenses:

 

 

ETA: Lists of MILSPEC ballistic rated eyewear:

 

U.S. Army ballistic eyewear list

 

Safety Glasses USA website list of MILSPEC ballistic rated eyewear

 

ETA: Found a picher!

 

Ultimate Guide to Military & Ballistic Eyewear Infographic

 

 

Edited by Ozark Huckleberry
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7 hours ago, Quiet Burp said:

 

I can find ANSI Z87+ certified and MIL-PRF 32432 rated glasses, are they ok?

Mine are the Mil spec polycarbonate. 

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Son was the Unloading Table Officer with his back towards the fire line.  Someone smacked him HARD in the back of his head.  He turned around to let whoever know that the smack hurt and wasn't appreciated.  Wasn't anyone there?!?!  Son discovered a hole in his hat and blood from his scalp.  He had gotten shot with a bounce back.

 

Recently the Daughter-in-law was have having a nerf gun battle with the 6 year old grandson.  She took a nerf to the eye.  Her eye site is gradually restoring as the blood in her eye clears.

Edited by Matthew Duncan
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Our eyes are bad enough from whatever gene causes you to be nearsighted.

 

Just to be safe we wear shooting glasses OVER our prescription impact resistant lenses.

 

Not an appealing look, but nice to have when the splatter storm comes in.

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32 minutes ago, Lawdog Dago Dom said:

Our eyes are bad enough from whatever gene causes you to be nearsighted.

 

Just to be safe we wear shooting glasses OVER our prescription impact resistant lenses.

 

Not an appealing look, but nice to have when the splatter storm comes in.

The US Army now calls them BCGs (Birth Control Glasses) because you don't look sexy wearing them.

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I have a friend I shoot with and we were at the California STATE match in April. He got hit in eye from the side - his glasses had no side protection - and fortunately only suffered from red-eye for a few weeks. Darn scary. Side flaps or wrap arounds are pretty important. 

RR

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41 minutes ago, Irish-Pat said:

what are some good shooting glasses that can be worn over bi-focal glasses

We use these with clear lenses.

 

https://www.cabelas.com/shop/en/champion-over-spec-shooting-glasses

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I picked up six pair of shooting glasses myself the other day... Ive never used them in the past and never have been bit by any flying objects... but would rather be safe than sorry.

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