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Irish-Pat

Anybody know who can strip and refinish uberti 73 stock

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My uberti 1873 carbine has that Italian gloss finish. Any redo those stocks. Irish Pat

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If you were closer, I would do it. But you could do it just as well as anybody else. Some Zip Strip and light sanding is about all it takes. Hand rub in the stain of your choice and a sealer over. You pick from matte to glossy. You should try it yourself, really.

 

Merry Christmas.

 

Slim

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Listen to Silm

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Get a can of Strypeeze. You can remove all the finish in less than an hour. Also get a small bottle of TruOil. Read up on TruOil and stock refinishing. Time consuming but not difficult.

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I recommend you wear nitril or latex gloves when using stripper. Also safety glasses.

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I have not done my 73 but did my rossi.Strip, light sand and TruOil.

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Prairie Dawg has Longshot Logan's article, I'm sure. Or PM me an email address.

Edited by Yusta B.

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I just took Hopies oil and 0000 stealwool and it turns out pretty good :-)

Just saying .

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Prairie Dawg has Longshot Logan's article, I'm sure. Or PM me an email address.

This is great advice. Recommend at least read it, then decide. GW Both are the same article

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That's the one - thanks Abilene.

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Stripping a stock of its finish depends on what type of finish is there to start with. The new epoxy based finishes are difficult to remove without sanding till you drop.

 

Once the finish is removed the wood should be sealed effectively to prevent moisture penetration.

I prefer to apply several liberal coats of Marine Spar Varnish and Thinner (50% 50%) until the wood will not absorb any more.

Over that you can apply Casey Tru-Oil until the desired finish is reached.

An alternate to Casey's is a 1/3 - 1/3 - 1/3 mixture of Shellac, Boiled linseed oil and Denatured alcohol.

Both of these finishes can be easily touched up if scratched or damaged.

I prefer not to stain. Let the beauty of the wood shine through.

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Howdy- if all you aim to do is take the gloss off, Rooster Ron 's approach is near to what I'd done on my '73 when I'd changed the butt from crescent to the more comfortable ( for me ) carbine style, Got one that was unfinished, and did not want to duplicate the high gloss of the fore end. Got it stained reddish to match closely, and went over it with many coats of Birchwood Casey TruOil ( which is a tung oil based product, I have read ) . I let same cure well, then took down the gloss with 0000 steel wool, Did the same to the glossy fore end. Then dressed both with Minwax Paste floor wax. Got the result I was after, and fore and butt match well, without blinding shine nor slick feel- sort of like how surf board wax works.( Yes, many years ago, I had occasion to surf infrequently )

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I did a my guns year before. Sanded off finish and dents, finished with 10 coats of truoil. Don,the get in a hurry. Looks great and you won't panic if you scratch your would because you know you can repair the damage.

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Birchwood Casey TruOil ( which is a tung oil based product...)

 

Nope, it's a linseed oil base. See the Birchwood Casey web site.

 

Another similar finish is Linspeed Oil. Another linseed oil with a dryer agent added. Both very nice.

 

Just be careful about storing any rags that have the oil on them. They can get hot enough to spontaneously ignite and burn down your work area!

 

Good luck, GJ

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Boiled Linseed oil

Walnut Oil

Tung Oil

 

Are just a few of the oil based finishes. They work by penetrating the wood and then drying to a solid.

Walnut Oil is the slowest drying. Weeks, even months depending on climate.

Boiled Linseed Oil is the fastest drying. Thinned with denatured alcohol this finish can dry in seconds if heated, minutes to a couple of hours under normal conditions.

A top coat(s) of Shellac is the easiest to repair.

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Irish Pat,

All the advice above works. It just depends on what you want for an end result and what kind of protection you are looking for in regards to weather.

 

Something you should know, if you use stain and the gun stocks are checkered the checkered area will absorb more stain and it will be darker in appearance if you do an overall stain job.

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And to get it really interesting: After you have sanded, wetted the wood and raised the hairs for final sanding, you need to get some ArmorAll along with the TruOil. Spray the stock lightly with ArmorAll. Tip the bottle of TruOil to wet down the tips of the three middle fingers and rub on the TruOil lightly. The TruOil should "harden"/ "dry" up quickly. Continue until you have done the stock and fore end. After you get through, you should be able to start with another coat.

Like a lot of other things in the world, we make startling discoveries. And yes, it works. The '73 in the picture was refinished using the method described. And I have done others.

 

No, I did not discover it. I did discover this article. First, for those who don't read the whole article:)

 

"Armor All (yes, the kind you use on tires and your dashboard) will cause Tru oil to harden almost immediately and bond to the coat beneath it. I would spray into my hand and rub the whole stock down with just the film on my hands. It does, however, dull the finish just slightly so don't do this for final finsh. It helped for the wiping on/off phase to get the nice translucence."

 

http://www.rimfirecentral.com/forums/showthread.php?t=331108

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Hi Irish Pat,

 

What Slim said. I've refinished lots of old furniture, with detailed carving. A butt stock would be easy. IMO, finish is the key. I always use lacquer (never polyurethane) and fine steel wool between coats. Shiny (Italian gloss, probably polyurethane) is bad, a mild sheen is the goal for a piece of fine wood..

 

Good luck!

 

Allie

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And to get it really interesting: After you have sanded, wetted the wood and raised the hairs for final sanding, you need to get some ArmorAll along with the TruOil. Spray the stock lightly with ArmorAll. Tip the bottle of TruOil to wet down the tips of the three middle fingers and rub on the TruOil lightly. The TruOil should "harden"/ "dry" up quickly. Continue until you have done the stock and fore end. After you get through, you should be able to start with another coat.

Like a lot of other things in the world, we make startling discoveries. And yes, it works. The '73 in the picture was refinished using the method described. And I have done others.

 

No, I did not discover it. I did discover this article. First, for those who don't read the whole article:)

 

"Armor All (yes, the kind you use on tires and your dashboard) will cause Tru oil to harden almost immediately and bond to the coat beneath it. I would spray into my hand and rub the whole stock down with just the film on my hands. It does, however, dull the finish just slightly so don't do this for final finsh. It helped for the wiping on/off phase to get the nice translucence."

 

http://www.rimfirecentral.com/forums/showthread.php?t=331108

+1 I did this procedure on my Stoeger after sanding odd all the checkering. Did 30 coats in 2 days and then lightly rubbed with 0000 cleaned steel wool. Looks great and not too shiny. The Armour All was a cool trick to make it go fast. If it build up too quick---you may get wrinkles so to speak---just sand out with 400-600 grit and go back to it. Nothing like the satisfaction of doing it yourself. JMHO

 

EH

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My friend did a 97 stock, stripped it, sanded it and applied Tru-Oil, looks nice!! He said it was an easy job too!!

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Lacquer finish on a gun stock will be prone to water discoloring, solvent attack, and will be rather brittle. Great on furniture that will be indoors (except bar or table tops where exposed to alcohol) though.

 

Much better to use TruOil or Linspeed when doing stocks. Just refinished a Swedish Mauser (lots of wood with that 29" barrel) - three coats in three days without ArmorAll. Just a couple drops of Japan Dryer in with the tablespoon of oil.

 

Good luck, GJ

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Anybody know who can strip and refinish uberti 73 stock

 

 

Well... I'll give it a try.

 

But the last time I took my clothes off... and used some paint remover... I got some of that sloshed over on my private parts. PAINFUL!!!

 

Send me the gun... you'll just have to take my words fer it... that I stripped.

 

ts

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