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Is your club being destroyed by feral hogs?


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Parts of ours looks like they have been carpet-bombed.  I threw down a bag of deer corn several weeks ago and sat after dark with my suppressed thermal scope equipped pig gun, and that was only barely successful, with only one of the beasts being eliminated.  Within the last few days, it looks like hordes have moved it, and they're not tearing up the areas where the corn had been thrown, which surprises me a bit.  I tried a sit last night but a cold front passed through while I was out there and the temp dropped from 59 to 41 in four hours and was still dropping, and I was not fully prepared.  More nights behind the rifle are planned, but I'm sure it is a project doomed to fail -- there's just too many of the bacon-carriers.

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11 minutes ago, Nostrum Damus SASS #110702 said:

More nights behind the rifle are planned, but I'm sure it is a project doomed to fail -- there's just too many of the bacon-carriers.

 

When I was in college, I occasionally went and killed hogs for a few bucks (not much but it covered expenses). There was a myriad of places where I could go and shoot pigs and does for free. Now it has become a business, and it costs a ridiculous amount of gold for city folk to hunt hogs, hence far fewer people are doing it which is resulting in the mass explosion of bacon carriers. Wish more ranches would open up the range to responsible hunters for free.

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If there is a lot of thatch from brush hogging tall grass lying around and decomposing it attracts grubs and the grubs attract the hogs. They also love pecans and acorns.

 

Invasive feral hogs may have finally met their match. A study by the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service reports that a poison made with with warfarin, a type of blood thinner, has shown to be effective in reducing feral hog numbers in the state and in turn preventing landowners' property and economic destruction, according to a recent news release. 

 

Poison is 'highly effective' in reducing feral hogs in Texas, study shows

Landowners who followed the correct steps in administering the poison reported drops in feral hog numbers. 

 

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4 minutes ago, Sedalia Dave said:

If there is a lot of thatch from brush hogging tall grass lying around and decomposing it attracts grubs and the grubs attract the hogs. They also love pecans and acorns.

 

Invasive feral hogs may have finally met their match. A study by the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service reports that a poison made with with warfarin, a type of blood thinner, has shown to be effective in reducing feral hog numbers in the state and in turn preventing landowners' property and economic destruction, according to a recent news release. 

 

Poison is 'highly effective' in reducing feral hogs in Texas, study shows

Landowners who followed the correct steps in administering the poison reported drops in feral hog numbers. 

 

Kind of interesting about warfarin. I had a catalog from 1958 showing a warfarin product for that. I myself take warfarin, but excessive doses can cause internal bleeding and subsequent death from it.

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Won't be long before the activists that want to end hunting start crying about the damage these critters cause. Especially when the grizz start taking out fifi.

Edited by Eyesa Horg
Missed a word
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We don't have this problem YET.  How close can you get?  I know the weapon of choice is a night scope with suppressor but it still looks tough.

 

Must not be able to get in buckshot range and run 5-6 thru the shotgun in 3 seconds?

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So ...

Warfarin-based pest control poisons have been around for a long time.  The problem with them, until the A&M development, has been that they accumulate in the flesh of the dead target animal and then kill every carrion eater as well, including Bald Eagles and every other creature.  It has taken years of work to find a delivery mechanism and form of Warfarin that avoids that problem, and the Aggies say they've succeeded where many have tried and failed.  We'll see ....

As to pigs being "smart" -- I'm sure they are just as smart as many people I've met, but the bar is very low.  We are shooting them in darkness -- the best blind out there.  They don't seem to notice us sitting 50 yards away, in reasonable cover.  But they scatter at the first shot at them, so having multiple shooters count down and shoot simultaneously at different pigs helps, as does shooting a semi-auto and shooting fast.  You only need clean head shots on the ones you're going to butcher and eat; all the others can be gut-shot or wounded and go die someplace else for all I care -- in fact, I prefer that.  

As far as other gunshots in the area scaring them off in general, our club is situated in an area where there is gunfire all day long and into the evening, whether by another nearby gun club or the friendly neighbors.  Our pigs are well accustomed to neighborhood gunfire and they don't give a you-know-what about it.

As for acorns -- have you been in the woods this fall?  The 2023 acorn mast in Texas is UNBELIEVABLE.

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It's Thanksgiving.

Been very busy.

Let my SASS Membership expire.  Looks like it was 11/1 due.

Paid for another year on-line a few minutes ago.

Have not been able to CAS shoot this year much, just indoors to keep cch skills fresh.

 

Just HAD to comment on the first post viewed, since renewed.  

Reply is:  I'll get to the range soon and check out the situation.  Unsure if we have any feral hogs still shooting at the range.  (Laughing to myself)

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1 hour ago, Eyesa Horg said:

Won't be long before the activists that want to end hunting start crying about the damage these critters cause. Especially when the grizz start taking out fifi.

 

Apparently, the environmentalists have been talking with the Biden administration and have reached "some sort of secret agreement" on the "disastrous" 4 dams that are in the Washington/Oregon area that are harmful for the Salmon. Seeing that salmon jump up taller waterfalls than the salmon ladders they built to get around the dams I am not sure what the problem is. I am especially confused as to why the "environmentalists" want to remove a renewable form of energy that powers 9% of Washington state and will require the equivalent of 500,000 cars of fossil fuels to replace. Throw in all of the transportation of goods (including 10% of US wheat) that passes through the four dams and the Columbia River and you are talking far more fossil fuels.

 

Confused in America.

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I can only get one at a time.  That full load BP 45-70 is just too noisy.

 

Onliest way I can get more is at the 500-600 range, but my eyes and knees just ain't what they use to be.

Edited by Presidio
For some clarification
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We have feral Hogs.  Not allowed to hunt them but nobody can stop a landowner... Fish and game helicopter shooting them for now.  Political "thinkers" believe people would import them for sport if open season allowed.  My guess is eventually we the people will get to have our chance.  

 

As a kid in college in NC, way before this was a problem, used to squirrel hunt for food before my UPS package loader PT job at the Raleigh hub began.  Often fell to sleep at the base of a tree until almost dusk when the squires were on the move.  Woke up once to feral hogs that drove me up a tree.  Personally, would love to shoot some for the local farmers....

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16 minutes ago, Nostrum Damus SASS #110702 said:

Here in Texas it isn't called hunting; the state calls it nuisance pest control.  No hunting license is needed.  No closed season, no restriction on method of pest control.

Not correct.

 

Phantom

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In Arizona, if a "wild animal" (2-legged or 4-legged) looks like it is going to attack a human being, or domestic, or non-domestic animal, a citizen of AZ can eliminate that particular "wild animal."

We don't have a "feral human or feral animal problem in AZ."

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Here in Tennessee, it is illegal to release or transport a trapped wild hog; it must be dispatched in the trap. Trapping is legal.

 

https://www.tn.gov/twra/wildlife/mammals/large/wild-hog.html#:~:text=In Tennessee%2C they are classified,or release live wild hogs.

 

During deer season, hog hunters must stop putting out bait. Otherwise, entice as desired. No limits on take. Daytime hours only unless exemption issued, then also night hunting allowed  and can use spotlights.

 

https://www.eregulations.com/tennessee/hunting/wild-hog-regulations

 

 

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6 minutes ago, Lone Spur Jake SASS #7728 said:

In Arizona, if a "wild animal" (2-legged or 4-legged) looks like it is going to attack a human being, or domestic, or non-domestic animal, a citizen of AZ can eliminate that particular "wild animal."

We don't have a "feral human or feral animal problem in AZ."

Have you seen your border lately...

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2 hours ago, Phantom, SASS #54973 said:

Not correct.

 

Phantom

What is not correct?

 

"As of May 31, 2019 you do not need a license to kill feral hogs on private lands in Texas. This includes hunting on a private ranch or a deer lease. The only place you are required to have a valid hunting license while hunting feral hogs is on public hunting grounds in Texas." (source: https://landassociation.org/do-you-need-a-hunting-license-to-hunt-hogs-in-texas/)

 

"Texas is a private lands state (over 93% of Texas is privately owned) ..." (source: https://tpwd.texas.gov/huntwild/wild/wildlife_diversity/nongame/listed-species/landowner-tools.phtml#:~:text=Texas is a private lands,we enjoy in our state.)

 

I suppose if you are unlucky enough to not be able to shoot nuisance wild pigs on any of the 93% of Texas that is privately owned, you will, in fact, need a Texas hunting license.

Capture.JPG

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3 minutes ago, Nostrum Damus SASS #110702 said:

What is not correct?

 

"As of May 31, 2019 you do not need a license to kill feral hogs on private lands in Texas. This includes hunting on a private ranch or a deer lease. The only place you are required to have a valid hunting license while hunting feral hogs is on public hunting grounds in Texas." (source: https://landassociation.org/do-you-need-a-hunting-license-to-hunt-hogs-in-texas/)

 

"Texas is a private lands state (over 93% of Texas is privately owned) ..." (source: https://tpwd.texas.gov/huntwild/wild/wildlife_diversity/nongame/listed-species/landowner-tools.phtml#:~:text=Texas is a private lands,we enjoy in our state.)

 

I suppose if you are unlucky enough to not be able to shoot nuisance wild pigs on any of the 93% of Texas that is privately owned, you will, in fact, need a Texas hunting license.

Capture.JPG

Two things:

 

1. You proved my response to your post to be correct.

2. You can not kill them in any way you wish...you didn't respond to that...Can you use poison???

 

Phantom

 

 

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Decades ago whrn I worked for the park service in Florida, I was stationed at a 15,000 acre state park. We had a serious problem with hogs. They destroyed large areas of wetlands and endangered plant species. I was able to kill over 100 but at their annual birth rate of 2 litters of 10-13 piglets individual hunting was ineffective. We built 8-10 ft on a side traps of chain link fence. The could be quickly dismantled and moved to another area. Fitted with a trap door and trigger that would be tripped once several pigs git to the far side of the trap we were able to get several at a time.

Edited by Utah Bob #35998
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8 minutes ago, Phantom, SASS #54973 said:

Two things:

 

1. You proved my response to your post to be correct.

2. You can not kill them in any way you wish...you didn't respond to that...Can you use poison???

 

Phantom

 

 

You win -- congrats.  This is the SASS website, and one of those letters stands for SHOOTING.  So, I suppose I should have been more specific.  You can use any Texas-legal gun that you legally own to SHOOT AND KILL nuisance wildlife wild pigs ... on 93% of Texas lands ... without a hunting permit.  So, if you are a convicted felon prohibited from possessing any firearms, at least according to federal law, you can't even shoot them.  But that hopefully doesn't apply to anyone reading this.  But you still win tonight's "let's split hairs" contest.

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5 minutes ago, Nostrum Damus SASS #110702 said:

You win -- congrats.  This is the SASS website, and one of those letters stands for SHOOTING.  So, I suppose I should have been more specific.  You can use any Texas-legal gun that you legally own to SHOOT AND KILL nuisance wildlife wild pigs ... on 93% of Texas lands ... without a hunting permit.  So, if you are a convicted felon prohibited from possessing any firearms, at least according to federal law, you can't even shoot them.  But that hopefully doesn't apply to anyone reading this.  But you still win tonight's "let's split hairs" contest.

You didn't answer the other point. Can you poison Pig/Hogs?

 

Phantom

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33 minutes ago, Phantom, SASS #54973 said:

You didn't answer the other point. Can you poison Pig/Hogs?

 

Phantom

https://www.chron.com/life/wildlife/article/feral-hogs-texas-poison-18438169.php

 

If you are referring to this....yup, I suppose you can.  Also see Sedalia Dave's post above.

 

Now what else is on your mind?

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1 hour ago, Nostrum Damus SASS #110702 said:

What is not correct?

 

"As of May 31, 2019 you do not need a license to kill feral hogs on private lands in Texas. This includes hunting on a private ranch or a deer lease. The only place you are required to have a valid hunting license while hunting feral hogs is on public hunting grounds in Texas." (source: https://landassociation.org/do-you-need-a-hunting-license-to-hunt-hogs-in-texas/)

 

"Texas is a private lands state (over 93% of Texas is privately owned) ..." (source: https://tpwd.texas.gov/huntwild/wild/wildlife_diversity/nongame/listed-species/landowner-tools.phtml#:~:text=Texas is a private lands,we enjoy in our state.)

 

I suppose if you are unlucky enough to not be able to shoot nuisance wild pigs on any of the 93% of Texas that is privately owned, you will, in fact, need a Texas hunting license.

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I'm betting that a lot more of Texas is owned by the state and federal governments than a puny 7% that would be left over from your 93%.  Likely that much or more is military bases, interstate highways, state highways, public streets, and major airports. Throw in government buildings, national parks, public schools and colleges, and a host of other places and your percentage goes WAY down!

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7 minutes ago, Forty Rod SASS 3935 said:

I'm betting that a lot more of Texas is owned by the state and federal governments than a puny 7% that would be left over from your 93%.  Likely that much or more is military bases, interstate highways, state highways, public streets, and major airports. Throw in government buildings, national parks, public schools and colleges, and a host of other places and your percentage goes WAY down!

Might want to re-read that high lighted sentence in the provided link again.  It's the percentage from the Texas Parks and Wildlife.

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My brother’s brother in law (my brother in law once removed?) has dogs with electronic collars that he uses to track and pin hogs. He tracks them in a tablet and when they catch the hog he moves in and stabs it to death. He invited me once but I passed. 
 

Seems like a labor intensive way to get rid of hogs.
 

For now our feral animal problem is limited to coyotes. Just last week I heard them take down a neighbor’s dog in the woods behind my house. Not a pleasant sound.
 

I’m just about ready to purchase a suppressor and a thermal scope to start thinning them out.

Edited by Captain Bill Burt
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8 hours ago, Presidio said:

Might want to re-read that high lighted sentence in the provided link again.  It's the percentage from the Texas Parks and Wildlife.

As a stand alone sentence I'm still reading it the same way and it's a BS statement....... as it stands.  If you want it to read differently, rewrite the statement so it's understandable.

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C'mon Forty Rod, learn some facts and history!!  If there is anything other than your imagination and misunderstanding to support your statement, we'd all love to read it.  Different sources publish different numbers, but they differ by only a couple of percentage points.

 

https://tpwd.texas.gov/huntwild/wild/wildlife_diversity/nongame/listed-species/landowner-tools.phtml#:~:text=Texas is a private lands,we enjoy in our state.  "Texas is a private lands state (over 93% of Texas is privately owned), and private land stewardship is crucial to maintaining the diverse array of habitats needed to support the unique and varied wildlife that we enjoy in our state."

 

https://www.texaslandconservancy.org/our-work:  "Over 95% of the land in Texas is privately owned. This creates a unique challenge for Texans, as conservation becomes the responsibility of private landowners."

 

https://stacker.com/texas/see-how-much-land-texas-owned-federal-government:  "Texas by the numbers - Land owned by federal government: 1.9% (3.2 million of 168.2 million acres)."

 

I could go ON and ON and ON and ON with more statistics proving my point.  What are your sources?  You may wonder why, when the federal government owns NEARLY HALF of the western part of the country, it owns a measly 1.9% of Texas.  For the answer, please learn some Texas and American history.  Texas was AN INDEPENDENT COUNTRY after defeating Santa Ana's Mexican Army in April 1836.  The deal made 10 years later between The Republic of Texas and The United States of America for Texas to become a state is VERY different from all of the other ways that areas of the west became states (which, if you don't know, was either (1) for the United States Army to wipe out whoever happened to live there for hundreds or thousands of years and then draw lines and declare everything inside the lines a new state, or (2) for the federal government to BUY it from some other country (see, e.g., Alaska (bought from Russia), and everything in the Louisiana Purchase (purchased from France) including all or parts of Arkansas, Iowa, Missouri, Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska, Minnesota, Louisiana, New Mexico, Texas (the northern edge and Panhandle), North Dakota, South Dakota, Wyoming, Montana, and Colorado).  When these (and other further west) areas became states, the USA required private landowners to turn over much of their land to the federal government.  (So, the USA stole land not only from the tribal peoples, but also from settlers, investors, business owners, shareholders, and other mostly white European-originated people as well -- the federal government stole land from everyone it could steal from.)  The United States of America never conquered The Republic of Texas and therefore got nothing by force, and did not BUY Texas from Mexico or anyone else.  That's why only 5-7%, depending on source, of Texas acreage is publicly owned, and why LESS THAN 2% of Texas is owned by the federal government. 

 

If you are wondering about how much of Texas is owned by the State of Texas, the answer is: less than 4%.  And the University of Texas System, an entirely separate entity created by the Texas Legislature, owns about 1% of the land in Texas.  There's your approximate 7% of publicly held land: 4(Texas)+2(USA)+1(UT)=7%.

Edited by Nostrum Damus SASS #110702
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10 hours ago, Presidio said:

https://www.chron.com/life/wildlife/article/feral-hogs-texas-poison-18438169.php

 

If you are referring to this....yup, I suppose you can.  Also see Sedalia Dave's post above.

 

Now what else is on your mind?

oooookay...did you happen to look at something other than a study on the effects of poisoning? In other words, can YOU poison pigs/hogs on YOUR property?

 

Looking forward to your well informed answer.

 

Phantom

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I have no idea about the use of poison by unlicensed individuals, or the use of Tannerite.  I would guess that using poison to kill wild pigs without proper training in its use and mitigation of undesired consequences (such as, for example, preventing any other animals from being killed by the poison) is a very bad idea, whether allowed or not, and I would also guess that using a sufficient amount of Tannerite to blow up a sounder of pigs could be a lot of fun, albeit very dangerous, too.  But these are just uneducated, uninformed guesses.

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