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Winchester 92 stove pipe


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I'm  having a problem with my rifle that I hope someone will have a fix for.  I have a very nice original Win 92 in 25-20  At least once every 10 rounds, one live round will stove pipe instead of chambering.  My load is 87 gr. RNFP cast loaded to the correct O.A.L.  Doesn't matter if I try running it fast or slow, same results.

Thanks

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Sounds like the ammo not the gun.  Are you sure you are getting a good crimp on the cartridges.  Maybe  adding some filler like cream of wheat would help keep the bullet from going inside the brass.  Just my 2 cents.

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Could be that your cartridge guides need shimming. This happened with my Rossi 92 .45 Colt and @The Original Lumpy Gritz recommended I look at shimming the guides. I know yours isn’t a Rossi or a .45 but I had the same exact thing happening. Shimming the guides fixed it. 

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15 minutes ago, Nickel City Dude said:

Sounds like the ammo not the gun.  Are you sure you are getting a good crimp on the cartridges.  Maybe  adding some filler like cream of wheat would help keep the bullet from going inside the brass.  Just my 2 cents.

Bullets are crimped with a factory crimp die.  Bullets aren't being pushed into the case, rifle just stands them up and won't chamber them.  I put them back in the rifle and they go in fine the second time.

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Could be the cartridge stop is not working properly. Remove the LH cartridge and clean the cartridge stop and the area in the receiver well. make sure the spring is in good shape. Be sure the spring is installed correctly during reassembly

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First, make sure ALL screws are tight.

If it still acts up---

Place a .005 steel shim between the RIGHT cartridge guide and the receiver. 

See what that does.

OLG 

Edited by The Original Lumpy Gritz
Brain fade
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OLG and Pat Riot have it right.  Take the right cartridge guide out, making sure not to lose any shim already there, and put in a shim.  I use a good grade of bond typing paper for making that type of shim.  It’s about .005” thick so one or two shims ought to do it.  Steel or brass shims work too but are much harder to cut out.  
 

Back 20 or so years ago when 92’s were the go-to gun for SASS stovepiping was a common problem and this was the fix.

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20 minutes ago, Cypress Sam, SASS #10915 said:

OLG and Pat Riot have it right.  Take the right cartridge guide out, making sure not to lose any shim already there, and put in a shim.  I use a good grade of bond typing paper for making that type of shim.  It’s about .005” thick so one or two shims ought to do it.  Steel or brass shims work too but are much harder to cut out.  
 

Back 20 or so years ago when 92’s were the go-to gun for SASS stovepiping was a common problem and this was the fix.

 

Thank you.  I'm working up a '92 made in 1894, and I'll keep this in mind!

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I would do some measuring before randomly shimming the guides. About .003 clearance is allegedly the optimum.

Has this gun always done this or is it a new thing?

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For shim stock I use harbor freight feeler gauges.  They are cheap and you get lots of different thicknesses.  

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You can measure between the guides to see what you are doing ...   

I cut strips from a metalized AAA bumper sticker to shim mine. 

The ones I used measured .003 (stacked two strips for .006) and they haven't desolved yet.

Plus ... they have "sticky" on them so you don't have to chase them around when you are putting the guide back in place. 

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  87 grains is correct but I used a 115 grain. The original spring set ups were slow, as you lighten things or increase speed past cowboy movie speed things change, be flexible in your approach. Never used a 25-20 for sass/cas but it was good on varmints. In 92's my rule is cartridge flips up bullet too light , short, or both. Trouble feeding into chamber,  cartridge too long. You may even have to alter the lifter rate to get optimum operation for sass/cas.

   In the original guns the guide spacing was usually good and doesn't change. But if that fixes it good. I usually measure side clearance and add .001" to each side in increments of spacing. The cartridge stop should always be checked. Cartridge guides shouldn't interfere with the rise of the cartridge or it can flip them up. So the correct guide side clearance especially on original 1892 calibers is critical. The lifter stop spring could be weak letting the lifter come up too fast.There are always a lot of factors using a firearm well past the century mark but it's worth it.

My 92 was made in 1892 so only one choice of caliber that year but I've shot and repaired many of all eras and varieties.

 

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57 minutes ago, Go West said:

I would do some measuring before randomly shimming the guides. About .003 clearance is allegedly the optimum.

Has this gun always done this or is it a new thing?

Haven't had it long, but it has done this from the start.

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Guns made with receivers that handle wide (.38-40 and .44-40) cartridges and narrow cartridges make up the difference with the cartridge guided/springs.

My guess is that the guide springs have become weak.  Replacing or shimmung those spring should help.

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Had the same problem with my Rossi 92. Measure the distance between the guides then I shimmed the right Cartridge guide. Hardest part was making the hole on the shim where the right side screw goes in the cartridge guide right side..

 

You can do it pilgrim.

 

JRJ

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47 minutes ago, Jackrabbit Joe #414 said:

Had the same problem with my Rossi 92. Measure the distance between the guides then I shimmed the right Cartridge guide. Hardest part was making the hole on the shim where the right side screw goes in the cartridge guide right side..

 

You can do it pilgrim.

 

JRJ

 

I use brass feeler gauges for shim stock and punch any necessary holes using a leather punch with a block of lead as the anvil.

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I had a 92 slicked up by a cowboy gunsmith, it stove piped live rounds when feeding after I got it back, never did it before. I finally decided he had cut the mag spring to short to make it easier to load. I put in a new mag spring and that cured my feeding problems. How weak is your mag spring? 

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1 hour ago, Sedalia Dave said:

 

I use brass feeler gauges for shim stock and punch any necessary holes using a leather punch with a block of lead as the anvil.

Yeh Dave good statement with the shim stock.

Placing it down on good surface and used a drill.

 

JRJ

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