Jump to content
SASS Wire Forum

balsamic vinegar and ice cream


Trigger Mike

Recommended Posts

5 minutes ago, Loophole LaRue, SASS #51438 said:

Ugh!  Gag!

 

Strawberries or peaches or raspberries or bananas - but NOT vinegar!

 

LL

Balsamic is a whole different animal from white vinegar. The high-end aged brands are Very tasty. But I’m not sure if I want to try it on ice cream.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

The good quality stuff works. not the cheap stuff.  REAL balsamic is thick and rich.  The cheap stuff is just regular vinegar with coloring and flavoring added. 

Not all that far from molasses on ice cream, really.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I just puked in my mouth. What is happening with the world? People will put vinegar on ice cream yet they get grossed out over someone eating squirrels.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Howdy,

Its NOT vinegar pard.

I don't have either one or Id give it a try.

 

After checking it seems it contains sulfites.

So overdo it and risk a headache.

 

Best

CR

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, MizPete said:

A question nobody has yet to answer:  what makes it balsamic?

 The label. :lol:

Link to post
Share on other sites

Being a man possessed of boundless curiosity and always eager to learn, I decided to gird my loins and delve into the mysteies of culinary oddities.

I scooped a dollop of Lucerne vanilla ice cream and applied about a half teaspoon of good balsamic on it. It’s not hideous at all. As Joe mentioned, fairly close to molasses. I would not make a regular practice of it but I neither passed out nor emptied the contents of my stomach in agony.

44F2324D-488B-47DC-8C62-D266FEFB7D43.jpeg

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, MizPete said:

A question nobody has yet to answer:  what makes it balsamic?


Ageing.  Lots and lots of ageing.

 

Quote

How Balsamic Vinegar Is Made

How does a lowly vinegar come to reap such praise? As far back as 900 years ago, vintners in the Modena, Italy region were making balsamic vinegar, which was taken as a tonic and bestowed as a mark of favor to those of importance.

 

Although it is considered a wine vinegar, it is not a wine vinegar at all. It is not made from wine, but from grape pressings that have never been permitted to ferment into wine.

Sweet white Trebbiano grape pressings are boiled down to a dark syrup and then aged under rigid restrictions.

 

The syrup is placed into oaken kegs, along with a vinegar "mother," and begins the aging process. It is required to be aged for 12 years in wood. Over the years it graduates to smaller and smaller kegs made of chestnut, cherry wood, ash, mulberry, and juniper until it is ready for sale. All of these woods progressively add character to the vinegar.

 

As it ages, moisture evaporates out, further thickening the vinegar and concentrating the flavor.

Some balsamic vinegars have been aged for over 100 years. It is this aging process that makes true balsamic vinegar from Modena in Northern Italy so expensive. Luckily, a little balsamic vinegar goes a long way, much like saffron.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well aged Balsamic vinegar as a whole new condiment.  The 7 to 20 year old stuff is likely to be good on salads and fruit.  For a really good experience  try some 50 to 100 year old Balsamic from Modena Italy.

 

Blackfoot

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Allie Mo, SASS No. 25217 said:

BTW, Balsamic vinegar is an excellent addition to a Bloody Mary. It ranks right up there with horseradish.

 

Now, that I can see.  Or Worcestershire sauce.  Seems more likely to enhance the taste of tomato juice and spices.

LL

Link to post
Share on other sites
50 minutes ago, BLACKFOOT SASS #11947 said:

Well aged Balsamic vinegar as a whole new condiment.  The 7 to 20 year old stuff is likely to be good on salads and fruit.  For a really good experience  try some 50 to 100 year old Balsamic from Modena Italy.

 

Blackfoot

 

 

 



During his transit, the prince of the Duchy of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Count Bonifacio III presented Emperor Henry with a gift of the local vinegar. The term balsamic, however, appeared nowhere in the poem. Unlike Orans vinegar that became widely known and mass produced, balsamic vinegar would continue to be a condiment of the local elites until the 19th century. Its popularity would later soar in the 20th century to give it a global appeal and make Italy the leading exporter of vinegar in the world.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Loophole LaRue, SASS #51438 said:

 

Now, that I can see.  Or Worcestershire sauce.  Seems more likely to enhance the taste of tomato juice and spices.

LL

I've used both and like the Balsamic better.

 

A couple of tablespoons is good in chili too. I think it would be good in any dish with tomato sauce.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I saw this on TV about how balsamic vinegar is processed.  I use balsamic vinegar very often so I decided to try it.  It is awesome.  But to be fair you have to use very good Balsamic vinegar and the best vanilla ice cream you can find.  It's something which normally people will cringe at but until you try it you are barking up the wrong tree.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Old people eat some weird stuff. :o I didn't know people bought plain vanilla ice cream, there  are other flavors, with flavor. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
47 minutes ago, Assassin said:

Old people eat some weird stuff. :o I didn't know people bought plain vanilla ice cream, there  are other flavors, with flavor. 

Nothing wrorng with the classics.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Never heard of that combination before. If you're inclined to try it, a little Web research indicates some brands are better than others on salads, and others are better on ice cream (vanilla), etc. Villa Manodori Artigianale Balsamic vinegar is an "affordable" one highly recommended for ice cream - it'll run you about $40 for an 8.5 oz bottle.

I might order a bottle for Thanksgiving, and give it a try.

BalsamicVinegar1.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks to Marshall Mo & the Subdeacon.  Now I know what & how & that I can't afford it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Must be something one must develop a taste for, I never could drink whiskey, gin, vodka,  or other hard liquor. Tasted like solvent. 

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, Assassin said:

Must be something one must develop a taste for, I never could drink whiskey, gin, vodka,  or other hard liquor. Tasted like solvent. 

 

 

 

You either tried the cheap stuff....or you have defective taste buds. :D

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Utah Bob #35998 said:

You either tried the cheap stuff....or you have defective taste buds. :D

Must be defective something, I get that a lot. :) Can't stand the smell of vinegar, makes me gag. Same with tobacco smoke and MJ,  just aint my bag. 

Enjoy that classic vanilla, I'm about to partake in some chocolate, with some kind of toffee chunks.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Assassin said:

Must be defective something, I get that a lot. :) Can't stand the smell of vinegar, makes me gag. Same with tobacco smoke and MJ,  just aint my bag. 

Enjoy that classic vanilla, I'm about to partake in some chocolate, with some kind of toffee chunks.

I prefer chocolate ice cream over all other types.

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, MizPete said:

Now I know what & how & that I can't afford it.

 

Since a very little bit goes a long way it may be more affordable than you think.  Yes, there can be a large initial outlay, as J Bar pointed out, but that 8oz can last you six months or more.  You use it as an accent rather than a major ingredient.

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Assassin said:

Old people eat some weird stuff. :o I didn't know people bought plain vanilla ice cream, there  are other flavors, with flavor. 

Vanilla is a near perfect desert.  You can add whatever you like to each bowlful and have a different flavor every night for s month or more.

 

Can't do that with most pre-flavored ice creams.

Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, Forty Rod SASS 3935 said:

Vanilla is a near perfect desert.  You can add whatever you like to each bowlful and have a different flavor every night for s month or more.

 

 

Exactly.  A decent vanilla ice cream is smooth and rich on its own.  Or you can add coffee crystals.  Or cocoa powder.  Or molasses (my favorite).  Or maple syrup.  Or...or....or.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Just tried the balsamic vinegar, didn't like it, washed it down with Orange marmalade and a bit of OJ over vanilla ice cream.

 

Got all manner of stuff to use: powdered chocolate or strawberry drink mix, milk and Crystal Light peach tea, chocolate syrup, Myers' Irish cream with ocoa and mint, Kalua, Amaretto, maple syrup, jams and jellies and preserves and compotes no end, canned and bottles and dried fruits nuts fresh fruits of all kinds, and the list goes on.

 

BTW, does anyone know a good way to take of some weight?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.