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Tell Sackett SASS 18436

Can anyone explain?

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Had something rather curious happen today. I've been shooting Winchester AAs Light target loads(12ga) in my 97 for quite a while. I consider the recoil from them negligable. Or I did. On one of the stages I went to try out my new Spartan double. Imagine my surprise when the recoil kicked the HELL out of my shoulder!

So now I'm trying to account for the difference in recoil between the 2 guns. The only thing I can think of is that the barrel of the 97 looks to be 5 or 6 inches longer. Can barrel length affect recoil? If so, it's news to me. Does anyone else know of anything that would account for the recoil difference in 2 different guns with the same shells?

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97's have less drop at the cheek and at the butt, enabling recoil to be directed straight back, rather than up into your cheek. Doubles have always been accused of kicking more. Plus, your long barreled 97 probably weighs a pound more than the Spartan/Baikal. It's not the barrel length, although the weight way out there helps, as it is the total weight. To shoot that double so it doesn't hurt you, you have to lean into it more, get your head down on the stock, and perhaps add some weight (like a dead mule "recoil absorber") to the gun.

 

Good luck, GJ

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Several things:

 

Barrel length adds weight, and weight reduces felt recoil.

 

Stock fit, longer or shorter stocks affect felt recoil.

 

Drop or lack of drop affects felt recoil. The straighter the buttstock the more straight back recoil you feel. Drop will give more of a barrel rise.

 

Forcing cone length.

 

Amount of right or left cast in the buttstock.

 

I'm sure I've missed several other things, these are just things I've read about through the years. I'm not a stockmaker.

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Yep, weight makes all the diff.!!! I've shot T-Bone's TTN, it's HEAVY don't feel any recoilw/lt target

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The shorter barrels of the double probably make her louder; that will help give the impression, at least, of more recoil.

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Your double weighs a little less than a 97, the stock drops quite a bit more compared to a 97 which more or less recoils straight back so the douple tends to rise more and whack your cheek giving the perception that it recoils harder, which it does. You can add a recoil reducer or even some lead shot in the stock bolt hole tightly packed will lessen that recoil.

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Several things:

 

Barrel length adds weight, and weight reduces felt recoil.

 

Stock fit, longer or shorter stocks affect felt recoil.

 

Drop or lack of drop affects felt recoil. The straighter the buttstock the more straight back recoil you feel. Drop will give more of a barrel rise.

 

Forcing cone length.

 

Amount of right or left cast in the buttstock.

 

I'm sure I've missed several other things, these are just things I've read about through the years. I'm not a stockmaker.

All good sources of differences, but a good or bad recoil pad will also show up a big difference in felt recoil.

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All, the item listed above can contribute to more felt recoil but the biggest difference is in the length of the action. Lay your 97 on top of your SxS and compare where the chamber is in relation ship to the stock. The chambers are so much closer to the shooter,meaning there is less steel between you and the recoil.

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It is sort of like a transmission.

 

This fellow explains it quite well:

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And for those Viper Owners:

 

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Enjoy the freedom of recoil. God bless all those that gave all to allow us to enjoy the freedoms we possess today as Americans.

 

GG

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Guest diablo slim shootist

Don't pull both triggers on your SXS at once...it wont kick so bad!!! :lol:

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"Don't pull both triggers on your SXS at once...it wont kick so bad!!! :lol:"

.

.

Now that would take some of the fun out shooting a double! ;^)

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the biggest difference is in the length of the action. Lay your 97 on top of your SxS and compare where the chamber is in relation ship to the stock. The chambers are so much closer to the shooter,meaning there is less steel between you and the recoil.

:lol:

And that shorter distance means the recoil is transmitted faster, sometimes even before you are ready for it!

 

GJ

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I'm nobody's glutton for punishment when it comes to recoil, but I can fire both barrels at once with a coach gun using AA or STS light targets and not get beat up IF I simply make sure I mount the gun properly. Get my head down, face welded to the stock, so all I see is the bead, not the top rib.....

 

You can't PUNCH somebody if they are already in contact with your fist, and a gun can't HIT you if yer already pressing hard against it. Folks with new shotguns tend not to glue themselves to em enough, and yeah buddy, they will hit ya then.

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It's physics. A heavier gun will exhibit less felt recoil. The coach gun you have is fairly light. Drop at the comb will transmit said recoil differently and you'll feel it more. Your going to want a recoil pad on that little russian coach gun.

 

Coffinmaker

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Howdy

 

You have discovered the difference between 'recoil' and 'felt recoil or perceived recoil'.

 

Simple Newtonian physics tells us that for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. This is true. So you might think that with the same load, two different guns will kick the same. But the weight of the gun figures very greatly in the equation. Although the actual amount of recoil with two different guns is exactly the same, the heavier gun will move backwards slower than a light gun. So the slam of recoil with a heavy gun feels more drastic than the slam of recoil with a heavy gun. On top of that, stock design also makes a difference in how recoil is felt.

 

My little Stevens hammered double is pretty light, but I learned a long time ago how to put it to my shoulder so that it does not kick bad with moderate Black Powder loads. Same with my Model 12 Trap gun. I can shoot it all day long with loads that a lot of CAS shooters would cringe at. Just have to make sure to place the stock firmly against the shoulder before pulling the trigger.

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Theoretical recoil is (Bullet or shot weight in pounds) times velocity divided by the weight of the gun. This simple physics.

Felt recoil is subjective: noise, angle of stock, pistol grip versus straight stock, butt pad design, etc..

The 1897 was designed by the most effective gun designer of all times. It was designed to be used by hunters and professional shooters who might unload several hundred rounds in one day. John Moses Browning and his brothers understood how to difuse theoretical recoil with details in stock design and gun balance. I shoot a double and original '87s and '97s. The genius of the Brownings' is obvious with every shot.

Good for you for noticing. Most shooters that I see just blast through shotgun, happy to make it through the load/shoot/unload challenge.

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I'm nobody's glutton for punishment when it comes to recoil, but I can fire both barrels at once with a coach gun using AA or STS light targets and not get beat up IF I simply make sure I mount the gun properly. Get my head down, face welded to the stock, so all I see is the bead, not the top rib.....

 

You can't PUNCH somebody if they are already in contact with your fist, and a gun can't HIT you if yer already pressing hard against it. Folks with new shotguns tend not to glue themselves to em enough, and yeah buddy, they will hit ya then.

Hi AJ,

 

That is excellent information!

 

Hug your SG like you love it!

 

Regards,

 

Allie Mo

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Thanks for all the feedback. Much food for thought.

I shot a double for 10 or 11 years before I switched to the 97 a couple years back, so I'm very familiar with a double. The difference in recoil between the 2 caughht me off guard. I'm going to need some gettin' used to, again.

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It is sort of like a transmission.

 

This fellow explains it quite well:

 

 

Golllleeeee Marauder,

I never learned so much in such a short period of time in all my born days. :ph34r:

I am thanking you for the opportunity to so further my education.

I can hardley wait to learn about the "Viper".

So...on with my continuing education program via the SASS wire. :excl:

it's a process! :blink:

Texas Tell Sackett. Please excuse the thread hijack. Best I just shut up and go mow the lawn. :D

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Check the choke on the two shotguns. The smaller the choke, the more a given load will kick.

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