Jump to content
SASS Wire Forum

New Brass Question


Recommended Posts

Just purchased some new Starline 45 Colt brass.  Before loading for the first time do I need to chamfer the case mouth edges to facilitate seating bullets?  Inside and/ outside?  Thanks.   :FlagAm:

Link to post
Share on other sites

Part of my reloading process was always to trim my brass to size. After doing so, I always deburred the edge. 

I don't suppose the world would spin off into space if you didn't, but I found it expedient to trim & deburr. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I always trim and de-burr my new brass, before re-sizing or belling. 

I found it surprising how many pieces needed attention.

That said, I'm not sure how critical it is in our game. 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I bought a lot of Starline brass over the years as a commercial operation.

I never had to trim Starline brass.

The brass does have a very sharp edge at teh mouth.

I would toss new brass in to the tumbler for a hour or so before loading it.

This took the sharp edges off and made loading so much easier.

 

Even bottle neck cases did not require trimming.

I think the only trimming I did was 45-70 for black powder and it was more to bevel the flash hole on the inside of the case.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I've never chamfered any pistol brass.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't know whether the burrs on new brass do any harm or not.  I'm certain they don't do any good.  I always deburr new brass.

Chamfer?  No, I don't try to achieve any particular mouth edge profile, if that's what you're asking.

Link to post
Share on other sites

In the 1st or second year of reloading I decided I needed more than the 600 45LC.  The cases were my once fired & once fired cases from a coworker gun nut who doesn't reload.  So, I bought 500 Starline cases.  I ran approx 50 through my XL650 before checking them in gauge.  I found that for almost every one the case mouth was higher than the gauge.  Since then I check every new case's length before loading.  I also check once fired pistol cases length the 1st time I load them; since, they index on the case mouth. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I use Starline brass. Load it brand new just like used brass. Never an issue for our game. The belling would negate the chamfer I presume.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I like Starline brass. I would caution anyone using new brass to at least check to see if they need resizing. My neighbor did not do this when he started into reloading a couple years ago and proudly sent me some photos of his first 100 rounds. He later found out they would not chamber...when asked if he resized the cases and asked if he needed to do that with new brass, the answer was "apparently for your gun..."

Link to post
Share on other sites

Bags of new brass can get smashed with a few obviously dented cases but even when not obvious may get some cases slightly out of round. I  always resize new brass. There are outfits that sell used brass that you can order at different price points depending on how much they are processed.  But that usually only 9mm, 40 s&w and 45acp.

Link to post
Share on other sites

New brass or already fired brass goes through the same steps. Lee undersize resizer (wife shoots a Marlin with a super tight chamber) with the decapping pin in place (I deprime all once fired after tumbling but before a sonic bath). Then primed, charged/ case mouth bell, bullet seated and the separate crimp. On the 38s we shoot, I see no reason to chamfer as the belling of the case mouth would negate the extra work. I will grab a handful of brass and mic for length, but as long as they are all within a few thousandths of each other, I proceed. I see no reason to trim new or old straight wall cases, they don't have the tendency to grow like a bottle neck case does. Now bottle necked cases need trimmed after every resizing in my opinion. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.