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Cheatin Charlie

My complaint of the day

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Why do some people who post on forums act as though they are texting someone?  They use a group of letters instead of typing out the correct words.

If you are too lazy to type the correct words I am too lazy to try and figure out what you are saying.

There my complaint of the day.

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3 minutes ago, Cheatin Charlie said:

Why do some people who post on forums act as though they are texting someone?  They use a group of letters instead of typing out the correct words.

If you are too lazy to type the correct words I am too lazy to try and figure out what you are saying.

There my complaint of the day.

 

Do you mean the people who use military acronyms assuming that everyone knows them?

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Charlie, I know what you mean.

 

I was on a gun forum the other day and found several threads where guys (lazy SOBs - we all know what that means) were creating acronyms / abbreviations pretty much out of thin air. I eventually figured out a couple of them, mostly because someone else either called them on it our somehow knew what they meant and wrote it out. 

On the third thread I asked “What does (whatever) mean? I cannot remember what the inane abbreviation was.

The twit that wrote the original post came back with a smartass answer. What was funny was there was a dog pile on this guy of responses telling him to do various things with himself over his idiotic abbreviations and acronyms. Apparently this was not the first time for this PITA POS. :D (A little smartass humor of my own...Sorry)

 

The other thing I see in this other site is using the letter “M” instead of writing “model” as in “S&W M14” or statements like “my M10” is shooting to the right.” 

One zipperhead a while back mentioned the fun range day he had with his “M60 and his M686”. He was referring to his S&W revolvers. :angry: Jackass!

 

Oh, I have another. “GOAT” as in “Just one goat” as in the funny post our esteemed Utah Bob posted regarding “Best Western” - that is hilarious Bob. I am still chuckling. Anyway, there is a short sentence in the middle of the “meme” (stupid freakin’ word) that says “Just one goat”. I asked what that meant. Rye was kind enough to enlighten me that “GOAT” means “Greatest Of All Time” in Internet-speak.

I find this Internet-speak annoying as well...

 

AND this stupid word “meme”! What the hell is that? MEME...sounds like a freakin’ urinary tract infection.

 

Meme in French means “same” or “even”.

In Turkish it means “breast” or “udder”

Meme in Chinese (Mandarin) means “kissing sound” B)

 

I like the Chinese version...all these morons on the internet can Meme My As...uh,....I better go now....

 

Rant mode off...thank you...

 

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1 hour ago, Subdeacon Joe said:

 

Do you mean the people who use military acronyms assuming that everyone knows them?

So I was in the navy and maybe it's an army thing but what does bravo zulu mean? I see it used frequently and I can't figure it out.

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9 minutes ago, Charlie Plasters, SASS#60943 said:

So I was in the navy and maybe it's an army thing but what does bravo zulu mean? I see it used frequently and I can't figure it out.

 

"Bravo Zulu" hails from the Navy.  More specifically, from the 1949 North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), Allied Tactical Publication 1(ATP1), which can be found in the Multinational Maritime Tactical Publication 2(MTP2) and comes from Table B in Allied Tactical Publication 1 (something starting with Alpha, or A, would be from Table A), and is the last alpha entry, BZ, meaning "Well Done."

Image result for bravo zulu

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I am also bothered by the old text speak but I have been using on line communications regularly since 1978 and even earlier ‘73-75 and have learned that it’s better for my health to ignore it.

Edited by Marshal Mo Hare, SASS #45984

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I agree with what Pat said.

 

But there's one he left out. People that take a standard abbreviation, that everyone knows what it means, and use it to mean something else.

 

Everyone - EVERYONE - in the shooting world knows (or damn well should know) what SA means.

 

So this moron starts talkin about his new SA. Not "SA revolver", not "SA auto". Just "SA". Couple or three sentences into his post and I realized that he did not mean single action. He seemed to mean semi-automatic. A few more sentences into the post, and it turns out that he did not mean single action or semi-automatic. He meant Springfield Armory.

 

Whacha gonna do with that type of fecalcephalit?

 

Droopy Dawg.jpg

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14 minutes ago, Subdeacon Joe said:

 

"Bravo Zulu" hails from the Navy.  More specifically, from the 1949 North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), Allied Tactical Publication 1(ATP1), which can be found in the Multinational Maritime Tactical Publication 2(MTP2) and comes from Table B in Allied Tactical Publication 1 (something starting with Alpha, or A, would be from Table A), and is the last alpha entry, BZ, meaning "Well Done."

Image result for bravo zulu

O..........K. That still makes no sense (at least to a civilian). Whoever came up with that must have been hitting the rum pretty hard!

JHC :P

 

JHC

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8 minutes ago, Alpo said:

I agree with what Pat said.

 

But there's one he left out. People that take a standard abbreviation, that everyone knows what it means, and use it to mean something else.

 

Everyone - EVERYONE - in the shooting world knows (or damn well should know) what SA means.

 

So this moron starts talkin about his new SA. Not "SA revolver", not "SA auto". Just "SA". Couple or three sentences into his post and I realized that he did not mean single action. He seemed to mean semi-automatic. A few more sentences into the post, and it turns out that he did not mean single action or semi-automatic. He meant Springfield Armory.

 

Whacha gonna do with that type of fecalcephalit?

 

Droopy Dawg.jpg

 

OH, that drives me nuts! I have seen that too! I think we should always respond with “YOU are a DA, and I don’t mean “double action!”

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12 minutes ago, Alpo said:

fecalcephalit

 

Bwah-HAH-hahahahaaaaa...:lol:

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Many correspondents read and respond to a forum using a phone ot tablet.  These devices have no standard keyboard for standard secretary school typing.  Using hunt and peck with one finger or a stylus on a tiny screen keyboard representation, abbreviations greatly facilitate communication.  

Get over it.

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I don't mind the acronyms as much as I do the people who intentionally write stupid jargon (this definition: a form of language regarded as barbarous, debased, or hybrid) trying to sound like a yokel.

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I used IMHO (In My Humble Opinion)a couple of times communicating with a lady shooter and she thought I was coming onto her for some reason. She actually asked me to stop using IMHO because she wasn’t interested in me. After I explained what IMHO meant I don’t think she believed me.

Edited by Yul Lose

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3 minutes ago, Marshal Mo Hare, SASS #45984 said:

Some acronyms go back a very long way: IIRC, IMO, IMHO, IMNSHO,.

 

 

Not for some people, I guess.

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25 minutes ago, Capt. James H. Callahan said:

O..........K. That still makes no sense (at least to a civilian). Whoever came up with that must have been hitting the rum pretty hard!

JHC :P

 

JHC

 

How they came up with the meaning doesn't have to make sense!  Just think of it as a different language.  https://www.navy.mil/navydata/communications/flags/flags.html

https://shippingandfreightresource.com/international-code-of-signals-and-its-application-in-the-maritime-industry/

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14 minutes ago, Marshal Mo Hare, SASS #45984 said:

Some acronyms go back a very long way:

 

Things like SNAFU and FUBAR come to mind.

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6 minutes ago, Subdeacon Joe said:

 

Things like SNAFU and FUBAR come to mind.

Way before the internet...

 

as computers came into use, FOOBAR became common, as well as FOO and BAR, not as acronyms but as names of things that would be quite boring if I tried to explain.

Edited by Marshal Mo Hare, SASS #45984

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36 minutes ago, Joke 'um said:

Many correspondents read and respond to a forum using a phone ot tablet.  These devices have no standard keyboard for standard secretary school typing.  Using hunt and peck with one finger or a stylus on a tiny screen keyboard representation, abbreviations greatly facilitate communication.  

Get over it.

I prefer reality. Many people are too lazy or stupid to communicate properly. ;)

Not an insult to you, just my perspective. 

 

I use a phone everyday online and on forums, as I have been today. Utilizing the hunt and peck process has not diminished my communication capabilities nor has it caused me to have to resort to abbreviating my words due to my need to get my point across any faster. It’s not a competition and I try not to make what I say a guessing game.

 

 

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Sometimes it is necessary to substitute the actual meaning with a letter, as the letter may refer to something otherwise offensive.  For example, in both SNAFU AND FUBAR, as with the meaning of the nickname for the B-52 bomber, BUFF, which can stand for Big Ugly Fat Fellow or something else (also the SpaceX "BFR")! not normally stated in polite society! :o:rolleyes:  Just MHO!

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17 minutes ago, Trailrider #896 said:

Sometimes it is necessary to substitute the actual meaning with a letter, as the letter may refer to something otherwise offensive.  For example, in both SNAFU AND FUBAR, as with the meaning of the nickname for the B-52 bomber, BUFF, which can stand for Big Ugly Fat Fellow or something else (also the SpaceX "BFR")! not normally stated in polite society! :o:rolleyes:  Just MHO!

This is true. ;)

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"Bless you heart" is a good response.  I use it on FaceBook from time to time.  Most don't know what to make of "Bless your heart." :huh:

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1 hour ago, Pat Riot, SASS #13748 said:

I use a phone everyday online and on forums, as I have been today.

As Pat said.

 

My computer took a dump over 3 years ago. Everything I do I do on my smartphone. With its little bitty keyboard, and one finger.

 

And I still use actual words.

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4 minutes ago, Birdgun Quail, SASS #63663 said:

"Bless you heart" is a good response.  I use it on FaceBook from time to time.  Most don't know what to make of "Bless your heart." :huh:

 

A Facebook friend reposted someone else's conversation in which one party used that phrase and the other responded with,  "Did you just tell me to eff off in Texan?"

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4 hours ago, Charlie Plasters, SASS#60943 said:

So I was in the navy and maybe it's an army thing but what does bravo zulu mean? I see it used frequently and I can't figure it out.

 

Naval History and Heritage Command

Quote

 

Bravo Zulu

This is a naval signal, conveyed by flaghoist or voice radio, meaning "well done"; it has also passed into the spoken and written vocabulary. It can be combined with the "negative" signal, spoken or written NEGAT, to say "NEGAT Bravo Zulu," or "not well done."

There are some "myths and legends" attached to this signal. The one most frequently heard has Admiral Halsey sending it to ships of Task Force 38 during World War II. He could not have done this, since the signal did not exist at that time.

"Bravo Zulu" actually comes from the Allied Naval Signal Book (ACP 175 series), an international naval signal code adopted after the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) was created in 1949. Until then, each navy had used its own signal code and operational manuals. World War II experience had shown that it was difficult, or even impossible, for ships of different navies to operate together unless they could readily communicate, and ACP 175 was designed to remedy this.

In the U.S. Navy signal code, used before ACP 175, "well done" was signaled as TVG, or "Tare Victor George" in the U.S. phonetic alphabet of that time. ACP 175 was organized in the general manner of other signal books, that is, starting with 1-flag signals, then 2-flag and so on. The 2-flag signals were organized by general subject, starting with AA, AB, AC, ... AZ, BA, BB, BC, ... BZ, and so on. The B- signals were called "Administrative" signals, and dealt with miscellaneous matters of administration and housekeeping. The last signal on the "Administrative" page was BZ, standing for "well done."

At that time BZ was not rendered as "Bravo Zulu," but in each navy's particular phonetic alphabet. In the U.S. Navy, BZ was spoken as "Baker Zebra." In the meanwhile, the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) had adopted English as the international air traffic control language. They developed a phonetic alphabet for international aviation use, designed to be as "pronounceable" as possible by flyers and traffic controllers speaking many different languages. This was the "Alfa, Bravo, Charlie, Delta..." alphabet used today. The Navy adopted this ICAO alphabet in March 1956. It was then that "Baker Zebra" finally became "Bravo Zulu."

 

 

Edited by Sedalia Dave
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3 hours ago, Capt. James H. Callahan said:

O..........K. That still makes no sense (at least to a civilian). Whoever came up with that must have been hitting the rum pretty hard!

JHC :P

 

JHC

 

We use Bravo Zulu in the Canadian Military, and use BZ as the abbreviation for it.

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Abbreviations don’t really bother me — if someone wants to say IIRC instead of, “If I remember correctly . . . . “ it’s not a big deal to me. Every forum, most professions, have their slang, some people post on very disparate forums but drag their slang from one to the other. 

 

Meh. It’s not a world-stopper. I think I could grammar-nazi with the best, but it’s just not a big deal. 

 

Consider the poster who stumbles into here and starts reading about TOs, ULTs and LTs,  PMs and SHBs. 

 

Likewise, if someone figgers on goin’ all hick-i-fied whilst they’re a-scribblin’ out a post, whall now — thet thar’s jest a bit o’ spicin’ in th’ jug, if you’uns catch ma drift. 

 

It’s all good. We come from different backgrounds, and a person’s slang — their Tier 3 vocabulary, if you will — is part of who they are. I respect that, and actually kind of enjoy the glimpses that it gives into different people’s backgrounds.   

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