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Use of the word Sir.


Deuce Stevens SASS#55996

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I have called a few world class jackasses Sir........... :rolleyes:

 

Well you do what you gotta do sometimes. :lol:

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IF his alias is "Peppermint Patty" he was just playing his part.......

 

Hmmm....hadn't thought about that....just goes to show you can always learn somethin' on the SASS Wire.

 

The "gentleman" coulda been one of them loosbians!

 

I guess you need ta be more gender sensitive there Dooce.

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Duece,

 

I would suggest you continue to be polite. For this person, perhaps an explanation would have helped. Something along the lines of "Ah, my mistake, I took you for a gentleman."

 

Very Best Regards,

BJT

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Dude, Dude, Dude....

 

you wasted the all time great opportunity to use a Monty Python line:

 

“Excuuuuuuuuse me, Sir. We are no longer the knights who say ni! We are now the knights who say ekki-ekki-ekki-pitang-zoom-boing!”

Oh....Knights who....so...recently...said ni...

hud (LOVE that movie)

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We are in cowboy shooting. In the cowboy code it says respect others and your elders. So you are doing it the cowboy way as the Riders in the Sky would say. We are here to have fun, shoot and respect each other. There is no reason for anyone to be upset about things, when this is a fun thing that we are here for. This is not called grumpy shooting style.

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Guest Paniolo Cowboy SASS #75875

I was shooting the mini match at Witer Range and a older gentlemen cleared me at the unload table. Like I always do when done I said "Thank you Sir". Well he ripped me a new one telling me that he was no longer in the Military and to not call him sir. As I didn't know his alias I was only trying to do what my Mom and Dad taught me and be polite. Not being in the military ever I kinda would say that the rules don't apply to me, not to mention I have heard "Sir" and "Ma'am" used a million times over and over again. This is about the third time it's happened to me. So what's the deal? Usually I just don't call them anything for the rest of the match. Just kinda wanted to see what other folks' takes are on this were.

 

Howdy Deuce!

 

In the military there was a kinda sorta joke that's been around for more years than I've been alive. And these days since I spend a lot of my time taking care of the American Legion Post here, I hear it all the time.

 

The joke is that someone will call someone else "Sir", and in response that person will say "Don't call me Sir, I was an Enlisted man and I worked for a living."

 

Meaning that you only call Officers "Sir" and the inference being that they don't work for a living.

 

It's an old joke, and being honest it's gotten even older since I've heard it over and over again for almost 40 years.

 

When someone says it to me these days, and has a cranky attitude along with it, well I politely say, "OK Pops, I didn't know your prune juice was kicking in!"

 

;):lol::lol:

 

After that, they'll appreciate you being courteous and calling them "Sir". ;)

 

Semper Fi!

 

:FlagAm:

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Some people need to be ignored....some make it harder than others. "why Johny, I forgot you were there. You may go now."

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+1... and not only was I raised by a good Baptist, God fearin' Texan mother, but the old man was career enlisted (E8). We could expect the spoon or the belt if/ when we ever forgot our manners.

 

"It's always time for good manners."

 

But, I've also found that the Mason- Dixon is the approximate boundary for the "Southern custom" of using Sir/Mam. If you use it in New Jersey you may only use it once. I'm sure some Yankee can explain why, but I'm not sure I want to know.

 

Bet he was a Yankee. :D

 

Use "Sir" and "Ma'am" all the time. Never had a problem up here.

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From now on you may call me "Sir Buffalo Dick." :lol:

 

You were knighted?

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Deuce,

 

after much thought, the following response would work great for only a handful of shooters. And, your one of them.

 

When the feller jumps you on your usage of 'Sir', you could politely reply with another comment and a smile like:

 

"Wow, that new mixture of K-Y Jelly and WD40 sure do make a great lubricant for my pistols and rifle".

 

Then walk away.....with a smile!

 

 

..........Widder

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I was shooting the mini match at Witer Range and a older gentlemen cleared me at the unload table. Like I always do when done I said "Thank you Sir". Well he ripped me a new one telling me that he was no longer in the Military and to not call him sir. As I didn't know his alias I was only trying to do what my Mom and Dad taught me and be polite. Not being in the military ever I kinda would say that the rules don't apply to me, not to mention I have heard "Sir" and "Ma'am" used a million times over and over again. This is about the third time it's happened to me. So what's the deal? Usually I just don't call them anything for the rest of the match. Just kinda wanted to see what other folks' takes are on this were.

 

My thinking is the same as yours on this issue Deuce - my reply to the man would have been: 'Well, that's an issue you would have to take up with my mom, and knowin' my mom...I ain't changin' my ways!!'

 

No need to change your ways because of a cranky ole fart! (although we are grateful for his service ;) )

 

GG ~ :FlagAm:

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Deuce pard, ya did right. I wuld say the same to you bein' twice yer age (or so).

 

Jes figger them that suffer from the Cranial/Anal Syndrome probly shuldn't be checkin' guns at the unloadin' table anyways......

 

http://www.psnw.com/~walksfar/cra-anl.html

 

hOOt B):FlagAm:

 

 

 

I was shooting the mini match at Witer Range and a older gentlemen cleared me at the unload table. Like I always do when done I said "Thank you Sir". Well he ripped me a new one telling me that he was no longer in the Military and to not call him sir. As I didn't know his alias I was only trying to do what my Mom and Dad taught me and be polite. Not being in the military ever I kinda would say that the rules don't apply to me, not to mention I have heard "Sir" and "Ma'am" used a million times over and over again. This is about the third time it's happened to me. So what's the deal? Usually I just don't call them anything for the rest of the match. Just kinda wanted to see what other folks' takes are on this were.

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Deuce pard, ya did right. I wuld say the same to you bein' twice yer age (or so).

 

Jes figger them that suffer from the Cranial/Anal Syndrome probly shuldn't be checkin' guns at the unloadin' table anyways......

 

http://www.psnw.com/...ar/cra-anl.html

 

hOOt B):FlagAm:

 

 

 

 

 

:lol: Great site...

 

GG ~ :FlagAm:

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As a former U.S. Army lieutenant-colonel and former enlisted before that, I can testify that no officer who rose to field grade or above, did so without the excellent help and experience of his NCO's! Those officers may fool themselves into thinking so, but I can tell you stories where my butt was saved more than once by a good NCO, and at least twice in Vietnam. They truly are the backbone of the military services. Notwithstanding what others may feel, I have no regrets in calling them "sir" in the most respectful way just as I would anyone else. Good manners, kindness and respect are never wrong.

 

I'm just sayin. :rolleyes:

 

Major Payne :FlagAm:

 

+1....from another ole Army Officer. As a Company Commander quite a few years ago, I always respected my First Sergeant's, "Sir, just tell us what you want done....don't try to tell us HOW to do it." ;)

 

And....my kiddos say "Sir" and "Ma'am" or they get throttled by me and the missus. It should not be a lost art form.

 

Chick

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Laugh it off,

Deuce, it's his problem, not yours.

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Thanks for all the responses guys. Working retail and also being a match director for our state shoot has given me a pretty thick skin so I was not really offended. I had just heard it enough and I wanted to see what the concensus was. Thanks again.

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I wouldn't let others bad manners effect my good manners. Forget it, and continue to be polite.

 

Shucks, when Goody is at my unloading table I even say, "Thank ya sir! I got the table" to Goody. :rolleyes:

Good manners are always in fashion. Go ahead Deuce and do what your folks taught ya to do!

 

 

FWIW...YMMV...SOso

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Deuce you could do like the dream of my sleepless nights Pauley Perrette did on an episode of NCIS... She called Gibbs Sir and he told her not to call him Sir so of course she called him Maam.

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The word "Sir" comes from sub-SIR-vient SIRfs in SIRbia SIR-endering dominance and authority to show their

SIR-vility.

 

That being said, you showed manners and the response of the responder showed a lack of manners.

Your rejoinder could have been, "Sorry, I took you for a gentleman, my mistake."

 

TOJS

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Actually sir derives from the latin "senior" meaning older. Oddly enough it eventually lead to the word "surly" relating to sirly or lordly.

 

So while not a sir, he was related to one ;-)

 

Cheers,

BJT

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But, I've also found that the Mason- Dixon is the approximate boundary for the "Southern custom" of using Sir/Mam.

 

Guess I'm the exception to that rule. My grandfather (The 32 year Navy man) taught my father that custom. My father (The Air Force veteran) taught me that custom. And I carry it with me to this day. It's common courtesy. Unfortunately common courtesy seems to be suffering the same fate as common sense. :(

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It's obvious he was neither an officer nor a gentleman.

 

My mother and grandparents were from the South. I grew up with "Yes, Sir", "No, Ma'am", "Please", and "Thank you". Continues to this day. Did have a boss who didn't like me calling him "Sir", even when I explained it was ingrained, second nature to do so. Every time I get my guns checked at the unloading table, it's "Thank you, Sir/Ma'am" to the person who clears my guns and to the person who brings me my brass, regardless of age. This old dog just ain't gonna try to learn a new trick, at least not in this area.

 

Deuce, you did right, Sir!

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Some time back I took my son to a Navy office in Portland. As I spent four years in the Air Force I have no idea of Navel rank and called an enlisted man Sir, to which he gave me the standard NCO reply. I said I did that to tick off the officers, he said it was OK then.

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You just keep being the fine gentleman that you are. I was raised that way(yes mam, yes sir), my daughter was raised that way and now my grandchildren. That is a sign of respect no matter who you are. My dad at 72 still says mam and sir to people half his age. I did have a woman jump down my throat once. She said that's what the slaves were made to call their master. I don't really know, I wasn't there. To me any way you see it, it is a sign of respect!

 

I.M.

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I was born and raised in New York and always say Sir or Ma'am to everyone that I meet or work with. Not sure about the mason dixon line as having any difference in manners but there are rude people from both the north and south of the line I guess. From a Yankee who knows how to treat everyone with respect and always thanking them even if they are grumpy, they have to look in the mirror each day to see what they look like, not me. DC The first post was not what I wanted to say after finally reading it. Sometime my hands move different than my typing.

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I teach 1st-4th graders. I always say "yes sir or yes ma'am" to my students.

...and when I hear them treat their classmates or adults with respect by saying "thank you" or "please"

I will tell them "I love good manners, thank you for having good manners"

most of my students will not be taught those things at home.

I have found that when they know I am going to treat them with respect, they treat me with respect.

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I teach 1st-4th graders. I always say "yes sir or yes ma'am" to my students.

...and when I hear them treat their classmates or adults with respect by saying "thank you" or "please"

I will tell them "I love good manners, thank you for having good manners"

most of my students will not be taught those things at home.

I have found that when they know I am going to treat them with respect, they treat me with respect.

 

I do the same thing in my classroom and I am from New York State, NORTHERN New York. Don't let Diamond make ya think that us New Yorkers are without manors. Just those New York City folk.

 

As for the comment, I probably would have said, "Thank you ma'am" the next time. Keep up the good work.

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I do the same thing in my classroom and I am from New York State, NORTHERN New York. Don't let Diamond make ya think that us New Yorkers are without manors. Just those New York City folk.

 

As for the comment, I probably would have said, "Thank you ma'am" the next time. Keep up the good work.

 

We know New Yorkers have manors. I believe the Rockefellers had a real nice one. :lol:

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