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I'm Full of Questions. Uberti '73 and Winchester / Miroku '92 .357 Only?


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So, my friend who has recently begun CAS was at a gun shop today, and they had Uberti 1873 and Winchester / Miroku '92 rifles in. He was about to purchase one, when the salesperson informed him they are ".357 Mag only," and not .38 SPC. I was somewhat befuddled, and nothing I could spot on the respective websites mentioned .38 SPC. So, I bring the question here. What am I missing?

As an aside, I did steer him away from the Henry in .38 SPC/.357 Mag, with side loading gate and tube loading.

 

I'm warning everyone... Don't make me break out the Meh...

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Believe the only thing you are missing is a knowable sales person     GWA

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42 minutes ago, G W Wade said:

Believe the only thing you are missing is a knowable sales person     GWA

 

I thought about that, but the rifles only have .357 Magnum printed on the barrels, and I got to thinking, which is always a dangerous thing, that the '92, at least the Rossi built ones like I have, can be finicky about overall length, so maybe that is it. Of course, it still wouldn't explain the '73, but having limited experience with them I was wondering why they would be .357 only. It made no sense to me. I had a Beretta for a brief period before career change dictated I sell it, and I know I shot .38s through it, and thought it had both .38SPC and .357 Mag stamped on the barrel. Still, one would expect some mention on the Uberti's website.

 

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I have several Uberti '73's.

All of them are marked "357 magnum" or "cal 357 mag"

None of them have ever had anything but 38's run through them.

YMMV

Regards

:FlagAm:  :FlagAm:  :FlagAm:

Gateway Kid

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I have a 73 in .357 and shoot .38’s all the time. The salesperson was uninformed !

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Thanks for the responses. They're pretty much what I expected. Clearly, the .38 doesn't present a problem to a .357 chambered '73 or especially a '92 as far as pressures and the like go. The only thing that made sense to me was an OAL thing. And again, only in the '92.

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I've got a '73 and have noticed that if you are loading deep seated 38's with light bullets you may run into a problem with the COL not being long enough to prevent a second round from just barely entering the carrier, preventing it from rising.

 

One option would be to load 357 cases but to 38 spec loads, but that's a solution looking for a very very rare problem. 

 

Ideally just make sure the COL isn't too short. I think my limit is 1.410 or something around there (=/- a few thou). 

 

Side note, I only experienced that problem with a full or nearly full tube. loaded 3 or 4 shorties and it ran fine. When I loaded all ten is when I got the feeding problems. 

 

As Gateway Kid Says: YMMV

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1 hour ago, DocWard said:

Thanks for the responses. They're pretty much what I expected. Clearly, the .38 doesn't present a problem to a .357 chambered '73 or especially a '92 as far as pressures and the like go. The only thing that made sense to me was an OAL thing. And again, only in the '92.

My OAL for .38's is 1.45 works just fine in my 73.

 

 

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357 nominal is 1.59,

I've seen 38SP loads for cast bullets range from 1.189 to 1.585 OAL
And 357 cast loads from 1.51 to 1.62" OAL

There are many loads for 38SP in the 90 to 158 grain range that are 1.45 and longer.
 

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Any 92 will feed 38 specials when cycled slowly. The problems arise when you try to go fast. 

 

I have seen at least one 73 that would not cycle short 38 specials. A little more ramp on the front of the carrier solved this problem.

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I expect to do a quick google, prove the clerk wrong, and we would all be happy. Instead I found:

 

The online owners manual for the 1892 says to only use the caliber stamped on the barrel. In the marketing info at winchesterguns.com, the 1892 rifles only state .357 (excluding the other chamberings).

 

The 1873 rifles on the same site list .357/.38 (again, excluding other chamberings).

 

I think it is possible the clerk is correct, and it would explain some of the sensitivity of the 1892 I have read about in this sport. Not that a little gunsmithing can not "fix" the problem. I don't see a safety issue, but it might explain some of the reliability issues.

 

Just because it usually works, or can be made to work, does not mean it was intended to work. But with knowledge, I think it can be made to work. From what I see on the web site, I would not expect warranty support for .38 Special in a .357-chambered 1892 without further clarification from Winchester.

 

 

Edited by John Kloehr
typo
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9 minutes ago, John Kloehr said:

I expect to do a quick google, prove the clerk wrong, and we would all be happy. Instead I found:

 

The online owners manual for the 1892 says to only use the caliber stamped on the barrel. In the marketing info at winchesterguns.com, the 1892 rifles only state .357 (excluding the other chamberings).

 

The 1873 rifles on the same site list .357/.38 (again, excluding other chamberings).

 

I think it is possible the clerk is correct, and it would explain some of the sensitivity of the 1892 I have rad about in this sport. Not that a little gunsmithing can not "fix" the problem. I don't see a safety issue, but it might explain some of the reliability issues.

 

Just because it usually works, or can be made to work, does not mean it was intended to work. But with knowledge, I think it can be made to work. From what I see on the web site, I would not expect warranty support for .38 Special in a .357-chambered 1892 without further clarification from Winchester.

 

 

 

My 92 can't tell the difference

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Why in the world does anyone want to fire .38 special in 357 rifles?  Simply load your .357 cases to .38 special velocities and carry on.  Never a glitch from "too short" 38's or the need to load with the bullet out "long".

I fire 357's in my 357 '73 and 38's in my 38 spl '66.

Other than "old SASS tradition", I don't get it.

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3 minutes ago, Joke 'um said:

Why in the world does anyone want to fire .38 special in 357 rifles?  Simply load your .357 cases to .38 special velocities and carry on.  Never a glitch from "too short" 38's or the need to load with the bullet out "long".

I fire 357's in my 357 '73 and 38's in my 38 spl '66.

Other than "old SASS tradition", I don't get it.

For those who reload, sure. For those who don't, there is a bigger cost difference. Of course, mostly anyone who shoots a lot is either rich or reloads.

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My Uberti 1873 tends to jam with .38 Specials, so I used .357s only. The last jam was nasty, as it peeled the mouth of the case back and I couldn't feed nor eject it. I ended up having to completely disassemble the rifle at home.

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Howdy,

And when is it a pard with a jammed rifle isnt handed at least three

others to complete the match??

Have things changed????

Best

CR

 

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