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This one has been going around a while.  Please look at these details:

1- The watermark on the photo is "US Army XXX Moments," a popular web page that makes fun of stupid stuff in the Army.

 

2- The belt is a US Army issued uniform belt.

 

3- The shorts are US Army physical fitness uniform.  

 

4- The T-shirt is the standard issue shirt for wear with the US Army Operational Camouflage Pattern (OCP), the current camouflage uniform.

 

5- The pistol is a Beretta M9, the standard issue handgun for the Army.  

 

6- Civilian running shoes and white socks are worn with the physical fitness uniform.  WHILE DEPLOYED, the T-shirt from the OCP uniform is an authorized substitute for the black physical fitness uniform shirt due to lack of laundry facilities.

 

7- The environment is obviously a cafeteria, known in Army circles as a Dining Facility (DFAC).  

 

8- There are rarely any means by which to secure weapons in deployed environments; they must be kept on the person at all times; this is true even on large bases where the weapon is unloaded.  It simply cannot be left unsecured anywhere.

 

9- The guy behind him is wearing civilian attire.  Look at his boots -- those are Air Force issue boots.  The Air Force authorizes civilian attire after 1800 hours, even when deployed.  

 

What is happening here is a soldier is stationed on a joint base in a deployed location (Kandahar?), has just completed his physical fitness training for the day and has gone to get something to eat at the DFAC.  He has his weapon for accountability purposes only (so it doesn't get lost or stolen).  The magazine that is inserted is almost 100% guaranteed to be empty, and stored in the weapon to keep dust out.  That would be a matter of a local commander's policy -- it's not one I would implement because you cannot know for certain if the weapon is loaded or not, but I'm not the local commander.  

Edited by Cyrus Cassidy #45437
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10 minutes ago, Cyrus Cassidy #45437 said:

This one has been going around a while.  Please look at these details:

1- The watermark on the photo is "US Army XXX Moments," a popular web page that makes funny of stupid stuff in the Army.

 

2- The belt is a US Army issued uniform belt.

 

3- The shorts are US Army physical fitness uniform.  

 

4- The T-shirt is the standard issue shirt for wear with the US Army Operational Camouflage Pattern (OCP), the current camouflage uniform.

 

5- The pistol is a Beretta M9, the standard issue handgun for the Army.  

 

6- Civilian running shoes and white socks are worn with the physical fitness uniform.  WHILE DEPLOYED, the T-shirt from the OCP uniform is an authorized substitute for the black physical fitness uniform shirt due to lack of laundry facilities.

 

7- The environment is obviously a cafeteria, known in Army circles as a Dining Facility (DFAC).  

 

8- There are rarely any means by which to secure weapons in deployed environments; they must be kept on the person at all times; this is true even on large bases where the weapon is unloaded.  It simply cannot be left unsecured anywhere.

 

9- The guy behind him is wearing civilian attire.  Look at his boots -- those are Air Force issue boots.  The Air Force authorizes civilian attire after 1800 hours, even when deployed.  

 

What is happening here is a soldier is stationed on a joint base in a deployed location (Kandahar?), has just completed his physical fitness training for the day and has gone to get something to eat at the DFAC.  He has his weapon for accountability purposes only (so it doesn't get lost or stolen).  The magazine that is inserted is almost 100% guaranteed to be empty, and stored in the weapon to keep dust out.  That would be a matter of a local commander's policy -- it's not one I would implement because you cannot know for certain if the weapon is loaded or not, but I'm not the local commander.  

Thank you. 

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1 hour ago, Cyrus Cassidy #45437 said:

This one has been going around a while.  Please look at these details:

1- The watermark on the photo is "US Army XXX Moments," a popular web page that makes funny of stupid stuff in the Army.

 

2- The belt is a US Army issued uniform belt.

 

3- The shorts are US Army physical fitness uniform.  

 

4- The T-shirt is the standard issue shirt for wear with the US Army Operational Camouflage Pattern (OCP), the current camouflage uniform.

 

5- The pistol is a Beretta M9, the standard issue handgun for the Army.  

 

6- Civilian running shoes and white socks are worn with the physical fitness uniform.  WHILE DEPLOYED, the T-shirt from the OCP uniform is an authorized substitute for the black physical fitness uniform shirt due to lack of laundry facilities.

 

7- The environment is obviously a cafeteria, known in Army circles as a Dining Facility (DFAC).  

 

8- There are rarely any means by which to secure weapons in deployed environments; they must be kept on the person at all times; this is true even on large bases where the weapon is unloaded.  It simply cannot be left unsecured anywhere.

 

9- The guy behind him is wearing civilian attire.  Look at his boots -- those are Air Force issue boots.  The Air Force authorizes civilian attire after 1800 hours, even when deployed.  

 

What is happening here is a soldier is stationed on a joint base in a deployed location (Kandahar?), has just completed his physical fitness training for the day and has gone to get something to eat at the DFAC.  He has his weapon for accountability purposes only (so it doesn't get lost or stolen).  The magazine that is inserted is almost 100% guaranteed to be empty, and stored in the weapon to keep dust out.  That would be a matter of a local commander's policy -- it's not one I would implement because you cannot know for certain if the weapon is loaded or not, but I'm not the local commander.  

 

You're either Sherlock Holmes or you've been there, done that.

 

:D

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21 minutes ago, Sixgun Sheridan said:

I immediately suspected it was an Army photo because civilian gun owners usually don't put that much holster wear on their guns. If you see a Beretta with half of its finish gone it's either a military M9 or an ex-LEO pistol.

 

No self-respecting cop would be caught dead (or alive) with a Beretta pistol.

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46 minutes ago, Cyrus Cassidy #45437 said:

 

No self-respecting cop would be caught dead (or alive) with a Beretta pistol.

 

Why do you say that? It was a common LEO pistol during the 1980s and 90s, and when the WA State Patrol turned theirs in for polymer HK pistols many officers lamented the switch. I personally own three and it's one of my favorite pistols, having fired over 20,000 rounds through them in total without ever having experienced a single malfunction. It may not be the best handgun out there but it's far from being the worst.

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Besides the WA State Patrol, the CT State Police, LAPD, LASO, and a host of other agencies also issued it. For a period of about ten years either the 92FS or one of the Smith & Wesson Third Gen pistols were by far the most common semi-auto pistols in police holsters. Then Glock made their move on the LE market and out-priced everybody, even offering to buy up the old sidearms as well. If anyone wonders why the Glock is King of the LE market it's because they were shrewd businessmen, not because their gun is markedly superior.

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My SIL is active duty Navy, currently PCS in Guam.
He has the option of carrying Sigs at his own expense instead of the Barettas.
He has no love for them.

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16 minutes ago, Sixgun Sheridan said:

Besides the WA State Patrol, the CT State Police, LAPD, LASO, and a host of other agencies also issued it. For a period of about ten years either the 92FS or one of the Smith & Wesson Third Gen pistols were by far the most common semi-auto pistols in police holsters. Then Glock made their move on the LE market and out-priced everybody, even offering to buy up the old sidearms as well. If anyone wonders why the Glock is King of the LE market it's because they were shrewd businessmen, not because their gun is markedly superior.

All that is true but it’s not the complete story. Most agencies at the time still used revolvers. The command staffs were reluctant to switch over to semi autos largely because of the expense but also because of the training issues and lack of experience with semis.

Glock made ab affordable weapon and overcame the prejudice of the old guard who only had limited knowledge of the 1911 and believed old anecdotal tales from the military.

Glock sent police instructors to armorer’s their course and provided a firearm that was:

A. Less expensive than most of the US made semi autos

B. Accurate enough for law enforcement purposes

C. Reliable

D. Simple to operate, safe and an easy transition for wheelgun shooters

My department conducted serious testing on the Glock 27 before adopting it.
As a firearms instructor, I never developed a love for the plastic wundergun. But I appreciated it for the reasons above.

But I digress as this has nothing to do with the original pic of which Cyrus has eloquently explained the background.

Edited by Utah Bob #35998
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2 hours ago, Sixgun Sheridan said:

 

Why do you say that? It was a common LEO pistol during the 1980s and 90s, and when the WA State Patrol turned theirs in for polymer HK pistols many officers lamented the switch. I personally own three and it's one of my favorite pistols, having fired over 20,000 rounds through them in total without ever having experienced a single malfunction. It may not be the best handgun out there but it's far from being the worst.

 

Don't forget I'm both retired LE and a career military officer (was active duty, switched to the reserves to go into LE).  On my Army half of life, I've carried that M9 since I was commissioned 20 years ago.  I believe Beretta shotguns are top notch, but their pistols are overpriced paperweights.  Absolute junk, on par with Lorcin and Raven with a higher price tag.  I carried both the original and the modified version of the M9 (aka Beretta 92 vs. 92FS on the civilian market).  The open top slide design is weak, causing the original version to break after a few thousand rounds of use.  The FS is a strengthened slide, but still junk.  The grips were designed for people who can palm a basketball, but average and small-handed shooters cannot grip it properly.  Double action triggers are for duffers; give me a single action every day.  The sights were not designed for rapid target acquisition, but to save cost and meet minimum contract requirements.  The magazines are crap and malfunction after only a few days in hot sandy environments.  

 

Shall I go on?  I'm just getting started.

Edited by Cyrus Cassidy #45437
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5 hours ago, Utah Bob #35998 said:

All that is true but it’s not the complete story. Most agencies at the time still used revolvers. The command staffs were reluctant to switch over to semi autos largely because of the expense but also because of the training issues and lack of experience with semis.

Glock made ab affordable weapon and overcame the prejudice of the old guard who only had limited knowledge of the 1911 and believed old anecdotal tales from the military.

Glock sent police instructors to armorer’s their course and provided a firearm that was:

A. Less expensive than most of the US made semi autos

B. Accurate enough for law enforcement purposes

C. Reliable

D. Simple to operate, safe and an easy transition for wheelgun shooters

My department conducted serious testing on the Glock 27 before adopting it.
As a firearms instructor, I never developed a love for the plastic wundergun. But I appreciated it for the reasons above.

But I digress as this has nothing to do with the original pic of which Cyrus has eloquently explained the background.

Also, Glock got them listed as a DAO pistol, which made them politically acceptable to liberal Supervisors.

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Beretta hasn't had issues with broken slides ever since the original cause was found and corrected. It was an ammunition fault, not Beretta's. As a matter of fact Beretta sued the US government over the damage done to their reputation and won. Also the cost of the FS upgrade was paid for by the US government since it wasn't Beretta's fault. As for the magazines, again it's common knowledge that the issue with sand messing them up was the fault of the government once again, contracting out to Checkmate Industries and specifying a Parkerized finish. The rough surface caused too much internal friction when sand got into the magazine body. New mags with a smooth PVD finish were developed, and now M9 mags are no worse than any other in the sand. As for the large grip and heavy DA pull, well that's simply par for the course with any DA/SA metal-framed semi-auto.

 

The biggest problem with the M9 in the military was the same as with the M1911A1: lack of preventative maintenance. Recoil springs were never replaced until they got so bad the pounding eventually caused the frames to crack and locking blocks to fail. We'll see just how long the new M17s manage to hold up, but if they're treated the same way the older guns were soon we'll be hearing about broken and unreliable SIGs as well.

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I've got to disagree with Cyrus.  I carried a Beretta 92FS for about 20 years in a 27 year LEO career.  I never had a problem with the pistol or any magazines.  Some guys did have problems with magazines that were dropped too many times on concrete floors during training.  How many here regularly drop their pistol magazines on concrete?  If you do I bet you have problems, too.

 

One of the most accurate pistols I've shot.  I agree that the DA/SA trigger takes some getting used to.  I never had a problem with it.  Any new trigger pull takes some time to get used to.

 

It has been my go to pistol for Instructor Certification and 3 Re-Certs.  If it wasn't reliable and accurate I'd have never passed the Instructor Qualification.  My EDC is a Sig P-938.  I couldn't pass the qual with that pistol because it does not have a large enough magazine capacity.  The 3" barrel at 25 yards wouldn't be helping me out any, either.

 

Cyrus has me on the military part.  I've never been deployed to a war zone or had to deal with a firearm that is regularly mistreated and/or passed around from person to person.  Mine is a one person gun that gets regular care and stays out of sandboxes.  :D

 

Just my .02

 

Angus

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Our switch from a revolver to a semi-auto ended up with the Glock as the user preferred sidearm.

Initially, some users liked the Beretta, but after some actual shooting trials by a number of potential users of varying skill levels, the Glock 17 for uniforms and the 19 for plainclothes, both in 9mm

A couple of years later we switched, at N/C, to .40s

As a daily carry gun, I felt then, it was the better choice of the offerings we had from the other manufacturers.

Total procurement for our Province was a potential 25,000+ for all forces.

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On 12/30/2020 at 8:42 PM, DeaconKC said:

Also, Glock got them listed as a DAO pistol, which made them politically acceptable to liberal Supervisors.

Other than malfunctions Glock's safe double action have the same DA trigger as DA revolvers.  Thereby not entering DA 1st shot SA follow-up shots plus safety manipulation into training.  The 1st pistol I bought was a H&K USP40 variant 2.  This variant is left hand SA-DA with slide release, safety decocker & mag release on the left side.  I acquired it before Kalifornia's safe handgun law. This version has never been on the list.  It is not a small hand person's gun.  Also, many people who have shot it don't like it for its' snappy recoil pulse & aggressive stippling on the grip.  It bites into your hand.  I bought it because it was an H&K & Sig didn't offer a left hand friendly pistol.  At the time I wouldn't consider a 1911; because, of my 1969-1971 Army experience.  The 1911's I shot must have been knackered; because, I shot torso sized groups at 7 yards.  The misses selected her one pistol a sub-compact 45 Kimber with aluminum frame.  The only pistols we own that has as good as accuracy is a CZ85.  The most accurate is a Ruger Mark II with bull barrel.

P.S. I didn't consider a Glock; because, they don't have a manual safety.  I no longer have a manual safety as a requirement for pistols.

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I came this close to putting money down on a Beretta 92 FS Inox recently. 
9E754939-8800-4654-8C1C-3AD995ED2FF4.jpeg.d7ce820e5068ba2e0096bb39d35596a7.jpeg

 

I opted for doing as I originally intended and bought a mate for my Glock 34. Now I have 2. 
 

The stainless Beratta looks real nice...and then the salesman said “The frame is aluminum” -_- I thought it might be cool to have an all stainless semiauto. The price was good. $659. My LGS doesn’t price gouge. 
 

I am glad I went ahead and bought the Glock. 

 

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With years of training with the 92F it became second nature where everything was and to draw and release the safety at the same time.  I didn’t like the gun itself, it just never right in my hand.  When I got home from Iraq in ‘06 I went looking for an EDC and went with the Beretta PX4 Storm in .40.  The ergonomics were the same so muscle memory was a plus, it is DA/SA so trigger pull was familiar, but the frame fit my hand better.  The Storm has a rotating barrel that helps to push the recoil straight back, can’t use it with a can, but I’ve got other guns for that.  No matter what kind of load I’ve fed it the recoil always was surprisingly easy to handle, I’ve never had a problem with it and still enjoy it 14 years later.

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