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Can Action Stars Hear?


Aunt Jen

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I'm watching "Expendables 3.". What i enjoy about it is how the stars are maturing.

 

But I notice: like in 100 other such films, everyone goes through their soldier career for decades shooting every kind of loud gun, without hearing protection, and they can still have a normal conversation?????

 

For those of you who have Actually been in combat, how does that work?

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There are a lot of different options for hearing protection. Peltor makes a headset, similar to an aviation headset, that's low pro and fits under a helmet. It has a "hear through" option that amplifies low noises, and filters all loud noises down to a max of something like 80-90 decibels.

 

There's also a few standard earplug options that are thin rubber disks on a post, and generally you can hear normal conversation wearing them, but the disks reflect most of the loud noise.

 

But even with hear-pro, some hearing loss is normal.

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Back in my day, around Audie Custer's time, only the artillerymen had hearing protection. And few of them used it, usually just fingers.

I had two ex-artillerymen on my A team. Our conversations were usually..... loud.

I've had tinnitus since 1970. Airborne troops had earplugs for sustained flights. But in combat your ears are assaulted.

Fortunately for action heroes, the loud explosions are usually added in the editing process.

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These guns are so loud, I'm surprised anyone could hear at all after using them a lot.

Me too. ;)

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Batman probably hears okay, but the Flash will not when he's supersonIc.

 

Aquaman: YES, underwater

 

Han Solo, John Candy and the gang, strolling along in their Winebego, probably can't hear because Steppenwolf is too loud.

 

Bruce Lee used Sonar: hence his "cat" growl.

 

Ripley? She could hear well, for a while.

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Over a 26 year career, I managed to make it to almost all the prime vacation spots where I was being shot at and shooting back. I have considerable hearing loss and have had tinnitus since my first "vacation" in Viet Nam. I can almost carry on a "normal" conversation.

 

Coffinmaker

 

PS: You do have to be looking/speaking directly at me.

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Back in my day, around Audie Custer's time, only the artillerymen had hearing protection. And few of them used it, usually just fingers.

I had two ex-artillerymen on my A team. Our conversations were usually..... loud.

I've had tinnitus since 1970. Airborne troops had earplugs for sustained flights. But in combat your ears are assaulted.

Fortunately for action heroes, the loud explosions are usually added in the editing process.

I was a R.E.M.F., a term from the Vietnam era, im told, meaning "Rear echelon (person).". I claim it, even though I missed the Vietnam Era by about 6 weeks.

 

The loudest noise I heard my whole time was my teletype.

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Two old men playing golf.

 

First old man hits his ball and then says to his buddy,

"I can't see so well anymore, did you see where my ball landed?"

 

Second old man replies,

"Yes, but I forgot."

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Auditory exclusion accounts for some of it. The body naturally shuts down what it considers to be unnecessary senses during fight or flight situations, hearing being one it shuts down. It's why hunters don't remember hearing the sound of the shot when taking an animal. At the range they fire the same gun and if they didn't have on hearing protection they would surely wish they had. The body shuts off the hearing, not that repeated exposure to gunfire wouldn't eventually affect your hearing of course. .

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During my Navy days, both my berthing are and my main work area had the flight deck for the ceiling. Transmitter Room #1 was directly under the forward tub-mounted dual 3"-50's. I have a lot of hearing loss and tinnitus.

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Soldiers can't hear. I started in the Army as an artilleryman, became an infantryman later - in the artillery, somebody will slap the $%#@ out of you if you try wearing earplugs (at least, 30 years ago). That's why we have the phrase "artillery ears."

 

I believe action stars use blanks that aren't very loud and get cooler sound dubbed in later.

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I've got hearing loss and ill fill in the blanks when I'm listening to some one talk, funny thing is I don't know I'm doing it till I get it wrong

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I can always recall the very first shot with a M-60 machine gun. My head exploded along with the round. After a volley I looked at the guy that was with me and only saw his lips moving, just loaded back up and back ta firing. 20% disability now with free hearing aids via Uncle Sam. A friend was a artilleryman, we say a lot of HUhhh!

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I has a co-worked ask me how log I had been reading lips. I told him I didn't and he quickly proved I do to some degree.

 

If i can't see your mouth, especially in noisy environments, I can't understand you. By putting what I can hear and what I can see, my brain has learned to put it together, but it isn't always successful.

 

Tinnitus is a constant thing I've learned to ignore and live with.

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I'm watching "Expendables 3.". What i enjoy about it is how the stars are maturing.

 

But I notice: like in 100 other such films, everyone goes through their soldier career for decades shooting every kind of loud gun, without hearing protection, and they can still have a normal conversation?????

 

For those of you who have Actually been in combat, how does that work?

It doesn't work. If you want to talk about it, I'll have to put my hearing aids in.

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I was a R.E.M.F., a term from the Vietnam era, im told, meaning "Rear echelon (person).". I claim it, even though I missed the Vietnam Era by about 6 weeks.

 

The loudest noise I heard my whole time was my teletype.

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In basic training in 1960 there was no concern for hearing protection so none was provided. With the M1 it soon became necessary for me to devise my own protection. Although I never smoked them, a pack of Winstons in the fatigue jacket pocket provided filter tips, and when torn off and placed in the ear canal, made an effective ear plug while allowing the shooter to hear normal conversation. I used that method on many occasions after my military service was over. However, I'm still hard of hearing. Must be from all my bosses screaming at me through the years. LOL.

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I was a R.E.M.F., a term from the Vietnam era, im told, meaning "Rear echelon (person).". I claim it, even though I missed the Vietnam Era by about 6 weeks.

 

The loudest noise I heard my whole time was my teletype.

I don't understand what it is you're claiming. kR

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The loudest noise I heard my whole time was my teletype.

 

Continuous noise is almost as bad as loud impulse noise. My wife was convinced I had hearing loss from working around computers with fans all the time. At least I think that's what she said.

 

What kind of teletype? We had a Model 19 and a Model 28. Dad was a Navy RTTY operator and taught Radioman school until he retired in 1971.

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Lol. I never heard the term at Ft Meade. Heard it later. And I slways thought it funny.

 

"Rear w d Gear" is a phrase I grant to those of u who were up "front in the hunt." a phrase i just now made up fir you. I was as far back w the rear as u could go. BUT also vital. Vital.

 

I did good work. But, no, no shooting there.

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Back in my day, around Audie Custer's time, only the artillerymen had hearing protection. And few of them used it, usually just fingers.

I had two ex-artillerymen on my A team. Our conversations were usually..... loud.

I've had tinnitus since 1970. Airborne troops had earplugs for sustained flights. But in combat your ears are assaulted.

Fortunately for action heroes, the loud explosions are usually added in the editing process.

I never had hearing protection and I stayed as far away from those noise makers as possible. You normally needed a road map and secret code to find my maintenance truck

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