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Marshal Mo Hare, SASS #45984

Anybody ever cooked a goose?

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A friend in Siberia said her babushka gave her a goose to cook. I’m thinking it’s a lot like duck, only bigger. Dark meat breast covered with fat, relatively insignificant legs. Is that it?

 

yes I do expect a few “your goose is cooked remarks, but I am more interested in the serious remarks.

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There are several good recipes if you search internet. As far as cooking one. I have and it is not a big deal. Lots more meat than a little old wood duck or mallard.

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I thought a "babushka" was a head scarf!:o

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Babushka means grandmother.

 

I believe the scarf is called that because Grandmas wear them. Like why it's a cowboy hat instead of just a hat. Kinda.

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Canadian, big hunting critter here in Missouri. Darn good like anything else if properly prepared. Also had different kinds of ducks. Archery Deer starts next Tuesday. You'll find me up a tree:D

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1 minute ago, Marshal Mo Hare, SASS #45984 said:

Hope fully not hiding from a critter.

 

Just ask the wife, I'm always up a tree:lol:

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3 hours ago, Alpo said:

Babushka means grandmother.

 

I believe the scarf is called that because Grandmas wear them. Like why it's a cowboy hat instead of just a hat. Kinda.

In conventional use Babushka is either grandmother or great aunt.  Great aunt is dvayurodnaya babuska, but who goes to the trouble of all those extra syllables.

 

similarly I have known women who had no siblings who said “my sister” technically it was dvayurodnaya syestra, but it means girl cousin.

 

dvayurodnaya means “twice removed” but I think it does not match what ‘removed’ means to us

 

 

 

Edited by Marshal Mo Hare, SASS #45984

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I've eaten 100's of them. That said there is a huge difference between domestic and wild geese. The wild geese have very little fat as compared to domestic geese. Cooking also is very different. ducks and geese are all dark meat. The ones I eat are wild birds and my cooking style reflects this and really arn't great for domestic birds.

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I've never cooked a goose but there's been many times when I was told MY goose was cooked!

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No, but I’ve goosed a cook (my wife)!

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After a very successful Snow Goose hunt at Cap Torment on the St. Lawrence River, (Dad and I had 40 birds!) the guide told us to skin the birds, (rather than pluck them) and cook them in Look Oven Bags for 2 to 3 hours, depending on size and whether it was stuffed or not, at 350.

Great eating and cooking in the oven bag, with a cup of white wine, before putting it in the oven kept the meat moist.

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I've cooked many.  After a while one starts to experiment; the last one - a Canadian my son shot - I made into chili.  Damn, but that was good chili~!   ^_^

 

About 45 years ago some buddies and I had memberships in a hunting club in Northern California.  We shot LOTS of pheasants, ducks, and geese, but most importantly had a great time.  But one of the fellas, ol' Bob Shuttleworth, was the de facto Camp Cook.  He enjoyed doing it, and we enjoyed having him do it.  The man was an artist!  Anyway, probably most popular of his creations was his Duck (or goose) Stroganoff.  Never any leftovers!  :blush:

 

Dangit... now I'm sitting here wistfully re-visiting those days.  One year we had a set of two covered two-man blinds dug into a "check" in a rice field, surrounded by 13 dozen+ goose shells and several dozen duck decoys.  The blinds were really comfy; boat cushions on the seats, shelves for shell boxes, mugs, and thermos... The camouflage covers were easy for us to see through, and when the birds were settling in, with a slight slap of the hand the cover would swing aside and you could pop up and shoot. 

 

One of the fellas took a day off in the middle of the week once, drove the 150 miles to the field, and discovered that someone had cleaned us out - stole every last decoy.   :(

 

Gotta be a special place in Hell for folks who'd steal decoys.  Mebbe an eternity of missed shots and plucking other guy's birds.  :angry:

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Hi:

 

We always called grandmoms "Busha" - short for babuska.  Put the goose up on a rack as there is a lot of schmaltz that will come off the goose when roastings.  This can be used with a little salt and spread on bread. :-)  The rack will keep the skin etc from being gooey - I like skin t be crisp like.

 

STL Suomi

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Last one I did was slow smoked for nearly 36 hrs. I took it in for the crew I worked with and it was gone in 15 minutes.

kR

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I cook wild geese in a roasting bag with veggies, water, and Worcestershire sauce.  A very rich and hearty meal. 

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