Jump to content
SASS Wire Forum
Sign in to follow this  
Badger Mountain Charlie SASS #43172

HUH! Learned of a rifle that I did not know

Recommended Posts

Watching Gun Story on the Sportsman Channel. Joe Mantegna introduced the  Model 8 Remington

Semi Auto rifle. Looked like the barrel was mounted in a sleeve with a recoil spring that opened the bolt. 

I guess it was introduced early in the 1900's in 4 Remington calibers. Interesting rifle. According to Joe, 

it was used to take down Bonnie and Clyde. Another idea from John Browning. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Was also used in the TV series The Son

 

Guns of 'The Son': 16 Models Used in AMC's New Western TV Series

 

Rifle pictured above is actually a Winchester 1907

 

Phineas McCullough used the Remington Model 8

 

600px-SonS1E08_01.jpg

Edited by Sedalia Dave
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is the follow on to the Model 8

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, Badger Mountain Charlie SASS #43172 said:

Watching Gun Story on the Sportsman Channel. Joe Mantegna introduced the  Model 8 Remington

Semi Auto rifle. Looked like the barrel was mounted in a sleeve with a recoil spring that opened the bolt. 

I guess it was introduced early in the 1900's in 4 Remington calibers. Interesting rifle. According to Joe, 

it was used to take down Bonnie and Clyde. Another idea from John Browning. 

I have a Remington model 8 made in 1921.  My dad bought it in 1941 from a man named Arch Symes....no idea why I remember his name and can barely remember my own...and I got it from Dad in 1961.  It's in the best of the offered calibers, .35 Remington (aka 9mm Remington in Europe).  The original calibers were .25, .30, .32, and .35.  As far as I know the .35 is the only one still being offered. Another caliber was introduced when they made some slight modifications and renamed it the Model 81.  I have an original tang sight on the gun and the rifle has recently been restocked because Dad was a small statured man and cut it off to fit him.  I would love to find an after market 20 round magazine for it, but I have a stash of three dozen original five shot stripper clips that are very desirable.

 

Among other things it has taken an Olympic elk, a smaller Rocky Mountain elk, a score of mule deer, a couple of white tail deer, one black bear, a cougar, two bobcats, and a pronghorn that I coaxed in to under thirty yards before I shot it.  (Curiosity will kill many things besides cats.)

 

It's a great gun and pretty well known.  I don't know how you missed it.

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting engineering.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had one of those in .35 Remington that I got from my gramma when my grampa passed. Somebody paid us a visit one night and decided that they needed it more than I did...

 

Pretty neat gun!

  • Sad 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like how it uses a clip AND a magazine :)  [sarcastic joke about another thread]

 

 

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nick name "Water Cooled Remington".  There may be some other names for it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
7 hours ago, Cyrus Cassidy #45437 said:

I like how it uses a clip AND a magazine :)  [sarcastic joke about another thread]

 

 

 

You're right sarcastic and not well received.

Edited by Tequila Shooter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I was a kid, I remember my Dad took one in on trade in the gunshop he owned. To me it was a bit heavy and ugly. Only one I ever remember seeing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had one in 35 Remington and still have one in 32 Remington.  They are wonderfully accurate for semi-auto rifles with open sights.

I have a couple of the "FBI" sights that I never got around to putting on a rifle, but they should make them even more accurate.

 

Duffield

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For your viewing pleasure.

I have my Great uncle's 1940 model 81 in .35 Rem. with take down case.

Image

 

 An engraved Grade D model 8 in .35 Rem. made in 1908 with a take down case made by AL Furstnow of Miles City Montana. I wish it could talk.

Image

 

Image

 

Image

1922 Model 8 with tang sight and Krieger detachable magazine conversion in .32 Rem.

Image

Image

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice Collection 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Forty Rod SASS 3935 said:

I have a Remington model 8 made in 1921.  My dad bought it in 1941 from a man named Arch Symes....no idea why I remember his name and can barely remember my own...and I got it from Dad in 1961.  It's in the best of the offered calibers, .35 Remington (aka 9mm Remington in Europe).  The original calibers were .25, .30, .32, and .35.  As far as I know the .35 is the only one still being offered. Another caliber was introduced when they made some slight modifications and renamed it the Model 81.  I have an original tang sight on the gun and the rifle has recently been restocked because Dad was a small statured man and cut it off to fit him.  I would love to find an after market 20 round magazine for it, but I have a stash of three dozen original five shot stripper clips that are very desirable.

 

Among other things it has taken an Olympic elk, a smaller Rocky Mountain elk, a score of mule deer, a couple of white tail deer, one black bear, a cougar, two bobcats, and a pronghorn that I coaxed in to under thirty yards before I shot it.  (Curiosity will kill many things besides cats.)

 

It's a great gun and pretty well known.  I don't know how you missed it.

Haha, I live under a rock, FR. Thanks for the info. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Abilene Slim SASS 81783 said:

Interesting! Apparently the barrel and bolt recoiled together.


https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Remington_Model_8

 

Browning designed a shotgun that had a recoiling barrel. 

Only an inch or so.  Many early semi-auto (and a few full autos,IIRC) guns used that feature.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
49 minutes ago, T.J. Bones SASS# 75616 said:

For your viewing pleasure.

I have my Great uncle's 1940 model 81 in .35 Rem. with take down case.

Image

 

 An engraved Grade D model 8 in .35 Rem. made in 1908 with a take down case made by AL Furstnow of Miles City Montana. I wish it could talk.

Image

 

Image

 

Image

1922 Model 8 with tang sight and Krieger detachable magazine conversion in .32 Rem.

Image

Image

I'd sell one of my toys for that first carrying case.

 

The magazine above is one of a half dozen designs.  Police Equipment Company sold them in five, ten, and twenty round versions that I personally seen.

 

I saw a nicely new condition Model 8 in a gun show in Pomona about 1980.  It was engraved and a presentation engraved on the left side of the receiver said something like "Presented to Captain Harry S. Truman from General John J. Pershing."

 

It wasn't for sale.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Tequila Shooter said:

 

You're right sarcastic and not well received.

 

Pard, I think apologizing to Alpo would go a long way.  Sure, sometimes he asks questions that come out of left field, but I'm convinced he's just trolling us for fun.  If not, he just marches to the beat of a different drummer, but has never given any indication that he is unintelligent in any way.  In fact, I would argue the opposite; he is perpetually curious, always exploring, and always considering new and alternate points of view.  This is a marked sign of intelligence.

 

Alpo quoted a movie line -- in quotation marks to denote the words were not his -- and the quotation misused the term.  But outside of the quotation marks he used every term correctly, demonstrating he does, in fact, understand the basic difference between a clip and a magazine, contrary to your initial assertion.  Not only that, he understands the basic rules of grammar, which dictate that in order to use quotation marks, one must render the original speaker / writer's words exactly as stated.  I suppose in a technical document he could have followed up with [sic] to demonstrate the error in the original quote, but this forum is hardly a technical document.  

 

Then you showed up and started nitpicking his use of terms.  Others have even quoted his post and boldfaced it to demonstrate the misused term is INSIDE the quotation marks, and his original post remains unedited -- in other words, he did not go back and correct it.  It was correct from the beginning and you simply failed to notice.  

 

In the post in question, your initial response came off to me the same way it did to Alpo and several others who commented.  He stated he felt accused of being stupid, and it definitely appeared you were accusing him of being stupid (having yourself failed to notice everything OUTSIDE the quotation marks used the terms correctly).  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Abilene Slim SASS 81783 said:

Interesting! Apparently the barrel and bolt recoiled together.


https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Remington_Model_8

 

Browning designed a shotgun that had a recoiling barrel. 

According to Joe Mantegna, in the narrative, said John Browning got the idea from the shotgun he was designing.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Finding out about new guns is dangerous.  The last time I found out about a new one was at a gun show.  It was a Winchester model 71 and it followed me home.  I still don't know how I just HAD to have a rifle and caliber that I'd never heard of 2 hours before. 

 

Now I wanna go bear hunting.  In case you were wondering what the dangerous part was. 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Ramblin Gambler said:

Finding out about new guns is dangerous.  The last time I found out about a new one was at a gun show.  It was a Winchester model 71 and it followed me home.  I still don't know how I just HAD to have a rifle and caliber that I'd never heard of 2 hours before. 

 

Now I wanna go bear hunting.  In case you were wondering what the dangerous part was. 

 

 

My work seems to done here. We need more bear hunters. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks to BMC, while I was watching Ride the High Country I noticed that one of the bad guys was shooting a Model 8.

 

600px-Hicountry3.jpg

Hicountry6.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Forty Rod SASS 3935 said:

I'd sell one of my toys for that first carrying case.

 

The magazine above is one of a half dozen designs.  Police Equipment Company sold them in five, ten, and twenty round versions that I personally seen.

 

I saw a nicely new condition Model 8 in a gun show in Pomona about 1980.  It was engraved and a presentation engraved on the left side of the receiver said something like "Presented to Captain Harry S. Truman from General John J. Pershing."

 

It wasn't for sale.

 

 

The Krieger conversion converted the original magazine to be detachable. On mine the magazine is serial numbered to the rifle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Badger Mountain Charlie SASS #43172 said:

My work seems to done here. We need more bear hunters. 

 

It's not done yet.  First someone has to prove to me that bear tastes good.  Till then it's always going to be a back burner thing where I'll try to kill one and eat it if I get a chance. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, Forty Rod SASS 3935 said:

I have a Remington model 8 made in 1921.  My dad bought it in 1941 from a man named Arch Symes....no idea why I remember his name and can barely remember my own...and I got it from Dad in 1961.  It's in the best of the offered calibers, .35 Remington (aka 9mm Remington in Europe).  The original calibers were .25, .30, .32, and .35.  As far as I know the .35 is the only one still being offered. Another caliber was introduced when they made some slight modifications and renamed it the Model 81.  I have an original tang sight on the gun and the rifle has recently been restocked because Dad was a small statured man and cut it off to fit him.  I would love to find an after market 20 round magazine for it, but I have a stash of three dozen original five shot stripper clips that are very desirable.

 

Among other things it has taken an Olympic elk, a smaller Rocky Mountain elk, a score of mule deer, a couple of white tail deer, one black bear, a cougar, two bobcats, and a pronghorn that I coaxed in to under thirty yards before I shot it.  (Curiosity will kill many things besides cats.)

 

It's a great gun and pretty well known.  I don't know how you missed it.

They were also chambered in 300 Savage.  I missed one that was owned by an uncle in law.  He had it and a Savage 99A in 300 Savage on consignment sale at a LGS.  They had been his deer hunting rifles.  By the time I learned he was disposing of them it had been sold.  My daughter has the model 99.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Badger Mountain Charlie SASS #43172 said:

According to Joe Mantegna, in the narrative, said John Browning got the idea from the shotgun he was designing.

The rear of the receiver looks similar to a Browning A5. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Badger Mountain Charlie SASS #43172 said:

Haha, I live under a rock, FR. Thanks for the info. 

Get out from under them rocks.  You'll catch Dutch Elm Disease, or California Cooties, or some other deadly BS ailment.  :P

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, Badger Mountain Charlie SASS #43172 said:

My work seems to done here. We need more bear hunters. 

I went hunting bare one time.  Got laughed right off the mountain.  :o

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, T.J. Bones SASS# 75616 said:

The Krieger conversion converted the original magazine to be detachable. On mine the magazine is serial numbered to the rifle.

Oh, thanks!   Now I'm REALLY jealous!!!

 

It is my understanding that you could order a rifle with the conversion (serial numbered to the gun) or have it converted (no serial number at all.  Very few with a maker's number.))

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, J.D. Daily said:

They were also chambered in 300 Savage.  I missed one that was owned by an uncle in law.  He had it and a Savage 99A in 300 Savage on consignment sale at a LGS.  They had been his deer hunting rifles.  By the time I learned he was disposing of them it had been sold.  My daughter has the model 99.

The .300 Savage wasn't offered in the Model 8, but was a standard offering in the M-81.

 

BTW, the .300 Savage is one of my favorite rounds.  I've had a Savage M-99 in that caliber (and one in .250-3000) and two bolt actions in the .300.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Forty Rod SASS 3935 said:

I went hunting bare one time.  Got laughed right off the mountain.  :o

Probably cold too. How could one unsee that situation, FR?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
52 minutes ago, Badger Mountain Charlie SASS #43172 said:

Probably cold too. How could one unsee that situation, FR?

I didn't think it was funny at all.  Didn't see a bear, nearly froze off parts I was still using, didn't have any place to carry food, water, cigarettes, ammo, my car keys, etc., and got frost bite on my hooha.  (That's an elbow, you nasty minded critters.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Forty Rod SASS 3935 said:

The .300 Savage wasn't offered in the Model 8, but was a standard offering in the M-81.

 

BTW, the .300 Savage is one of my favorite rounds.  I've had a Savage M-99 in that caliber (and one in .250-3000) and two bolt actions in the .300.

The 99 with rotary magazine in 250-3000 take-down is the most valuable version of the model 99.  Mine is a take-down with most of the bluing gone & many dings & gouges in the stocks.  It must have spent most of its' life on the floorboard of a pick-up truck.  Except for the post 1950 box magazine types the 99 is the best looking lever action rifle chambered for metal tipped spitzer bullets ever with its' shallow receiver.  In tube magazine feed lever action rifles it's the 1873 with CCH receiver & half or full octagonal barrels.  If the misses would let me I would collect Savage 1895, 1899 & 99's.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.