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How to remove finish from rifle stock.


Notso Slim, SASS #67301

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I think any chemical paint remover works well. That's what I did. I have the Cimarron version (made from Uberti parts) with the checkering on the forearm and pistol grip (yes, Cimarron makes one with a pistol grip stock), so I didn't want to sand it off and ruin the checkering. It worked beautifully. I did a little light sanding with a very fine grit (400 or something) to smoothen everything up before applying Danish oil as a finish.

It is by far my prettiest gun!

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:FlagAm::FlagAm::FlagAm::FlagAm::FlagAm:

 

Another vote for Formby's.

 

MG

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+2 for citristrip

 

Regardless of what stripper you use, remember to wash it afterwards.

Each stripper has a recommended "wash", many are mineral spirits.

 

You will most likely have to refill all the pores and resand the entire thing.

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I use THIS.

I thought I was the only one. Great stuff. Citris based strippers are very effective but not nearly as rough on the wood or the nose as more common chemical paint removers.

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Take a piece of broken Glass and scrape it off. I used a piece from a Old thick Coke bottle. Works great.

 

Jake

I'm glad you mentioned this because I was going to.

 

Broken window glass works fine. Break the glass. One side of the break edge will be sharp, the other dull. Use the sharp side and the finish will scrape right off.

 

When it dulls just break the piece of glass again.

 

Over the years my father and I have refinished a lot of gun stocks and used this method to remove the old finish. Didn't use anything else.

 

Sage Creek Gus

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Bury it in a cats litter box for 4-6 months.... then.....rub the finish right off. Do not pick your nose after!

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I use citristrip. I found the fore-wood and the butt stock were very different colors--perhaps even different species under the red lacquer.

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Depends on the finish. Everything mentioned will work on certain finishes. I've refinished maybe 100 stocks over the years and used almost everything you could imagine. I just refinished a Weatherby rifle that had a plastic finish on it. It was the most difficult finish to remove that I have ever worked with. I finally had to use a chemical remover and then use my heat gun to soften the finish, then scraped it off.It was a bitch and took several weeks. Finally came out fine.

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I use citristrip. I found the fore-wood and the butt stock were very different colors--perhaps even different species under the red lacquer.

The Citristrip worked great to take off the finish and I do agree with you-I think they are different woods. I am using Minwax Cherry Oil Stain. Took a lot of work to get the two pieces even close to the same color. Now they match pretty good and I have 3 coats of satin finish Tung Oil on them and each coat makes them look better. I figure 3 more coats should be good.

 

Thank you everyone for your input.

 

P.S. I love my rifle but am very disappointed in the wood quality.

 

Slim

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The best looking stock I have on any of my long guns is on a Chinese hammered SXS I bought three years ago. It looks just like black walnut with a Danish oil finish. Man, I love that stock!

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The Citristrip worked great to take off the finish and I do agree with you-I think they are different woods. I am using Minwax Cherry Oil Stain. Took a lot of work to get the two pieces even close to the same color. Now they match pretty good and I have 3 coats of satin finish Tung Oil on them and each coat makes them look better. I figure 3 more coats should be good.

 

Thank you everyone for your input.

 

P.S. I love my rifle but am very disappointed in the wood quality.

 

Slim

I hear ya Notso Slim about the wood quality. I stripped the red stuff off one of my 73's and found a strange light colored hard wood that had lots knots with white filler, then it would'nt take the stain. I have an ugly rifle now, thinking about topping it off with some nasty brass tacks just for negative style points. It does shoot pretty good though.

 

Spittoon

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four or five years of heavy CAS activity will remove most of the finish on any rifle, except for whatever is in the checkering.

I have used the waterborne thinner available from Lowe's.

The important part is not to remove any wood. Ubertis usually have an excellent wood-to-metal fit. Removing any wood may result in a loose stock.

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I hear ya Notso Slim about the wood quality. I stripped the red stuff off one of my 73's and found a strange light colored hard wood that had lots knots with white filler, then it would'nt take the stain. I have an ugly rifle now, thinking about topping it off with some nasty brass tacks just for negative style points. It does shoot pretty good though.

 

Spittoon

You might try some wood prep pre-stain made by minwax. I have used this before and it allows the stain to set to the piece better.

 

P.S. Both my '66 rifles are "topped off with some nasty brass tacks". What can I say, I like bling, no matter how many negative style points they earn me.

 

have a nice day, <_<

Slim

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You might try some wood prep pre-stain made by minwax. I have used this before and it allows the stain to set to the piece better.

 

P.S. Both my '66 rifles are "topped off with some nasty brass tacks". What can I say, I like bling, no matter how many negative style points they earn me.

 

have a nice day, <_<

Slim

Foot in the mouth again, Ha :)

 

Spittoon

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