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Like windows XP? dont want to learn windows 7?


Chili Ron

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Howdy,

I know xp pretty well, I bought a cornfuser with 7 on it and had a real

waste of time. I took that one back and eventually found a netbook with

xp on it and bought that.

So 18 months of typing on a baby keyboard and I pick out a samsung cornfuser.

According to the owner book it has xp and can be switched and reboot to xp.

I havent done it yet.

Check it out if you dont want 7.

Best

CR

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It's been a real learning experience... but my "new to me" (son's old one updated to include Windows7 and IE 9) 'puter... Been after it for about two weeks now, and slowly getting used to it. It has a 64-bit processpr and 2 solid state hard drives, let me tell ya, it's FAST! If only I could shoot as fast! There ARE things about Windows7 I like better, and others that are strange. But, "change" is one of those things that humans tend to resist, (unless we're the ones initiating it), and it will come about, regardless!

 

Pain in the rear that some of my needed programs won't run on the 64-bit 'puter, and new versions of the ol' stand-by programs are less than user-friendly in getting the old data to read correctly! Also, some web pages don't like the 64-bit version of Internet Explorer... or vice versa!

 

Hi-tech red-neck that I am... the son keeps trying to get me pried away from my old "flip-phone" cell... keeps tellin' me I WANT one of those new palm thingies! Bah humbug! Why would I want a handheld that I can surf the 'net on, when I can hardly read what's on my 17" 'puter screen... think that lil' 3" number will make that better? Not bloody likely!

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Boy can I relate to this post!

 

I'm taking delivery of a new laptop 12 April. Windows 7, solid state HD, 2nd gen intel processor fastest chip I can get etc. etc.

 

HOWEVER, I dread the thought of transferring all my old files, settings and programs to the new computer and learning a new OS....and discovering all the surprises that await. I'm very accustom to XP and have had no issues with it.

 

I wish there was a reliable way to just hook up the two computers and tell the new one to suck out everything in the old one and make the new one look like the old. I know about the software that supposed to do this like Intelli Move and PC Mover but I've read good and bad reviews about all of them. I'm ready to take both computers to a computer professional and just tell him make this one look look like my old and call me when its done! :wacko:

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Dan,

I dont know what cornfuser yer gittin but check thet thar little book.

You might just be able to get xp turned on with a few clicks and reboot.

The salesfolk did NOT know about the xp option.

I will have to live with xp on one and 7 on the other, Im leanin to

havin xp on both and maybe just make life that much simpler.

This has i3 process and lota space.

If you have stuff moved from one to another make sure they move

everything you had on the old one. I found a few things didnt make it.

Hope it all goes good fer ya.

Best

CR

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You really ought to take the time to learn to use Windows 7. Even an old fart like myself had little issues with it. It is by far the best operating system Microsoft has released in the last few years. Much better than XP.

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All the hassle and frustration could have been avoided had you just switched to MAC. Simple.

 

Coffinmaker

I did the best of both worlds. I bought an imac and using Parallels I was able to load XP as a virtual machine. I use the mac side for all my graphics oriented things (photos, videos, etc.) but I can still use my pc programs (Word, Excel, etc).

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Personally, I like Windows 7. I bought a hard drive dock, took the hard drive out of my "old" laptop and plugged it into the dock. The new laptop sees it as another storage drive. Then I moved all of my files to the new laptop. The only issue that I had was that I had to change ownership on all of the migrating files, but once I figured out how to do that, it was pretty much painless...

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It's better'n Vista, by far.

 

One thing 'bout both Vista and Seven is the "new,[un-]improved" Explorer. That'd be the file management Explorer, not the Internet Explorer. They say it's more "intuitive." Bulloney! :angry:

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My old "main" computer in the house is a 6 yr old Vaio on XP. It was, in it's day, a very fast machine.

 

My 2 yr old laptop is only "fair" by modern standards, runs Vista, and is about as fast and easier to operate.

 

My kid's 1 yr old HP desktop is blistering fast, has all sorts of processor, and NEEDS IT to run windows 7, but does so absolutley rock solid. In a year he has NEVER experienced a single error message or blue screen. Networking the three machines, even simple stuff like getting em all to see a wireless printer has been "interesting" to say the least, but once up and running, they all work, and it's simply a matter of playing a little hide and seek to find familiar stuff on w7.

 

In the world of confusers, it doesn't pay to get married to any version. Time and functionality marches on quite rapidly. Don't sweat it.

 

If anyone plays graphics intense video games on a machine, it wants all sorts of power, and ought to have a hefty stand alone graphics card with it's own cooling fan, but the main "brains" of these monsters has really come along a lot, and ought to be embraced as real progress. Just do it.

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You really ought to take the time to learn to use Windows 7. Even an old fart like myself had little issues with it. It is by far the best operating system Microsoft has released in the last few years. Much better than XP.

 

+1

 

I'm not an old fart, but I love Windows 7 compared to previous versions. I found it very intuitive and easy to learn, and haven't had a single issue in the year or so I've been using it.

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The three programs I use most, will not work on Windows 7. It may work fine but buying all new software is part of their BIG PLAN.

 

Roo

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Boy can I relate to this post!

 

I'm taking delivery of a new laptop 12 April. Windows 7, solid state HD, 2nd gen intel processor fastest chip I can get etc. etc.

 

HOWEVER, I dread the thought of transferring all my old files, settings and programs to the new computer and learning a new OS....and discovering all the surprises that await. I'm very accustom to XP and have had no issues with it.

 

I wish there was a reliable way to just hook up the two computers and tell the new one to suck out everything in the old one and make the new one look like the old. I know about the software that supposed to do this like Intelli Move and PC Mover but I've read good and bad reviews about all of them. I'm ready to take both computers to a computer professional and just tell him make this one look look like my old and call me when its done! :wacko:

 

 

Colonel Dan,

 

Let me know if you ned help and I can help you. Maybe you could come down to shoot Miakka one weekend and bunk at our house and we could work on your computer the day before on Saturday...

 

-Deadlee

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Pards,

 

I feel lucky to have gone from XP (also a Vaio) to Windows 7 and skipped Vista. I really didn't have what I consider much trouble switching. One lucky thing was that my Office version still worked with it and it works fine. Unfortunately, I had to get new Photoshop. IMO the biggest inconvenience is the need for new programs. What a racket!

 

When I've bought new computers, I've tried to go with the latest, fastest operating system, in a home-use model, and lots of ram. If you decide you need a certain new program, you may find it doesn't work with an older OS. Did I tell you, I think that's a real racket! :rolleyes:

 

I really haven't found Windows 7 to be much different from XP. Or, at least the differences have been intuitive (for me).

 

Regards,

 

Allie Mo

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Don't hold on to that old PC to long. Support for some versions of XP has already ended. Extended support for XP with service pack 3 will run until April 2014. Without support for fixes and updates you are putting your PC at significant risk when online.

 

Microsoft has extensive help available online. For those that are confused by the new file Explorer, take a look at this page:

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/help/top-solutions

 

Start at Windows 7 help and How-to, to find a way to transfer your files:

 

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/help

 

Google is your friend with this stuff. ASK Questions!

 

Olen

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...I wish there was a reliable way to just hook up the two computers and tell the new one to suck out everything in the old one and make the new one look like the old...

Hi Colonel,

 

There is a way to do that. I copied the following from my Windows Help.

"Transfer files and settings from another computer

 

Windows Easy Transfer is a step-by-step guide for transferring files and settings from one computer running Windows to another. It helps you choose what to move to your new computer, such as user accounts, Internet favorites, and e‑mail. It also lets you decide which method to use and then performs the transfer. For more information, see Transferring files and settings: frequently asked questions.

 

Go to the Windows website to watch a video about using Windows Easy Transfer to transfer files and settings. (3:58)

 

To open Windows Easy Transfer

Click to open Windows Easy Transfer. ‌ If you're prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.

 

To open Windows Easy Transfer Reports

You can view your Transfer Reports anytime after your transfer is complete.

 

Click the Start button .

 

In the search box, type Easy Transfer Reports, and then, in the list of results, click Windows Easy Transfer Reports. If you're prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.

 

Windows Easy Transfer can't transfer files from a 64-bit version of Windows to a 32-bit version of Windows. If you're transferring from a 64-bit version of Windows Vista to a 32-bit version of Windows 7, you can move your files manually or use Backup and Restore in Windows Vista. For more information, see Back up your files and Restore a backup created on a previous version of Windows on the Windows website. If you're transferring from a 64-bit version of Windows XP, you'll need to move your files manually."

 

Following are the FAQ headings, which are links.

"Transferring files and settings: frequently asked questions

 

Here are answers to some common questions about transferring files and settings.

 

Go to the Windows website to watch a video about using Windows Easy Transfer to transfer files and settings. (3:58)

 

What is Windows Easy Transfer?

Windows Easy Transfer guides you through the process of transferring files and settings from one Windows computer to another. Using Windows Easy Transfer, you can choose what to transfer to your new computer and how to transfer it. For more information, see Transfer files and settings from another computer and How does Windows Easy Transfer make setting up a computer easier?.

 

Click to open Windows Easy Transfer. ‌ If you're prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.

 

What can I transfer to my new computer?

You can transfer most files and program settings. Specifically:

 

Files and folders. Everything within the Documents, Music, Pictures, and Shared Documents folders. Using advanced options, you can select additional files and folders to transfer from other locations.

 

E‑mail settings, contacts, and messages.

 

Program settings. Settings that keep your programs configured as you had them on your old computer. Windows Easy Transfer doesn't transfer the programs themselves. Some programs might not work in this version of Windows, including security programs, antivirus programs, firewall programs (your new computer should already have a firewall running to help ensure safety during the transfer), and programs with software drivers.

 

User accounts and settings. Desktop backgrounds, network connections, screen savers, Start menu options, taskbar options, folders, specific files, network printers and drives, and accessibility options.

 

Internet settings and favorites. Internet connection settings, favorites, and cookies.

 

Pictures and video. Pictures—which includes any visual format (for example, .jpg, .bmp, and .gif files)—and personal videos.

 

Music. Electronic music files, playlists, and album art.

 

Note

Windows Easy Transfer moves your music and video files, including files protected by digital rights management (DRM), but it doesn't move the licenses for these types of files. To re-obtain rights to the files, you'll need to contact the provider of the files. Some online stores offer this and might refer to it in different ways, such as computer activation, computer authorization, library restoration, or license synchronization. The procedure for restoring your digital rights varies from store to store. A store might limit the number of times that you can restore your rights, or it might limit the number of computers on which you can use the songs or videos that you've obtained from them. Some stores don't permit you to restore rights to protected files at all. For details about store policies, refer to your store's customer support or Help information. If your music or video was obtained from a store that's no longer in business, you won't be able to restore your rights to that content.

 

Can I transfer programs?

No. Windows Easy Transfer transfers only program settings, not the programs themselves. To use the programs from your old computer, install them on your new computer, and then transfer files and settings for those programs. It's possible that some kinds of programs, such as security and antivirus programs, might not work with this version of Windows.

 

Which transfer method should I use?

There are several choices. Be sure to choose a method that works on both computers. For example, if your computer isn't connected to your network, you can't use a network to transfer files and settings to your new computer.

 

Easy Transfer Cable

What you'll need: An Easy Transfer Cable and a USB port on each computer.

 

The Easy Transfer Cable is a specially designed USB cable that connects two computers and works with Windows Easy Transfer to transfer information between the computers. It's one of the easiest ways to transfer files and settings to your new computer. You should always start Windows Easy Transfer on your new computer and plug in the Easy Transfer cable only when you're instructed to do so. Before you plug in the cable on your old computer, be sure to insert the CD that came with it to install the Windows Easy Transfer software and continue the transfer process.

 

Where to get one: If you didn't buy an Easy Transfer Cable with your computer, you can order one on the web from your computer manufacturer, or get one at an electronics store.

 

Note

A standard USB cable cannot be used to transfer files and settings between computers.

 

Network

What you'll need: A network with both computers connected to it and the ability to access the same network folders or locations.

 

Make sure that both computers are connected to the same network. Start Windows Easy Transfer on your new computer (the computer that you want to transfer your files and settings to), and then follow the instructions. The Windows Easy Transfer key acts like a password to help protect files and settings when you transfer them over the network.

 

USB flash drive or external hard disk

What you'll need: A USB flash drive (this requires a USB port on each computer) or an external hard disk compatible with both computers.

 

Start Windows Easy Transfer on your new computer (the computer you want to transfer files and settings to), and then follow the instructions for using a USB flash drive or an external hard disk. During the transfer process, Windows Easy Transfer will estimate how much disk space is needed to transfer your selections. If you use a USB flash drive, use one with enough storage space for the entire transfer.

 

How long does it take?

How fast your files and settings are transferred depends on a few factors:

 

The amount and size of the files and settings you transfer

 

The speed of your computers

 

The transfer method you choose: Easy Transfer Cable, USB flash drive, external hard disk, or networking

 

Generally, the more you transfer, the more time it takes. The faster the computers and the faster the transfer method (for example, an Easy Transfer Cable or networking for many files, a USB flash drive for fewer files), the faster the transfer will be. But whether the transfer takes a half hour or several hours, it's usually more efficient to use Windows Easy Transfer than to copy everything manually.

 

Can spyware, viruses, or other types of malicious software be transferred?

Yes. If you transfer files containing malicious software from your old computer, that software can be transferred to your new computer. You should run antivirus and spyware protection programs at all times, especially on your old computer, before you select files to transfer. After you've transferred files to your new computer, run those programs on the new computer to make sure that no malicious software was transferred.

 

Which versions of Windows will work with Windows Easy Transfer?

You can use Windows Easy Transfer to transfer files and settings from a computer running Windows XP, Windows Vista, or Windows 7 to another computer running Windows 7.

 

Note

Windows Easy Transfer can't transfer files from a 64-bit version of Windows to a 32-bit version of Windows. If you're transferring from a 64-bit version of Windows Vista to a 32-bit version of Windows 7, you can move your files manually, or use Backup and Restore in Windows Vista. For more information, see Back up your files and Restore a backup created on a previous version of Windows on the Windows website. If you're transferring from a 64-bit version of Windows XP, you'll need to move your files manually. For more information about 32-bit and 64-bit versions of Windows, see 32-bit and 64-bit Windows: frequently asked questions.

 

Article ID: MSW700003

 

"

 

As my previous computer's hard drive crashed, the techs put my data, favorites, settings... on disks and I transferred in from them.

 

Also, if you are using Outlook Express, it is no longer available. You can download free Windows live mail and then import your emails to it.

 

Good luck!

 

Regards,

 

Allie Mo

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Allie hits on an important concept. One thing to do is to always TRY to get the most robust, fastest "general purpose" computer you can find. Lotta processor, lotta RAM, etc, as it will likely be functional far longer than a "bargain basement" computer barely able to run current programs. Things tend to evolve toward EXPECTING you to have more power, and new programs will run poorly, if at all on a two year old "weakling",but will usually run halfway decent on a 4 year old "powerful" computer. The puter I;m on right now was badddddd in it's day, 3.4 GHZ processor, etc, etc, etc. It's a pentium, not dual core, but 6 years on it's still functionally able to do most stuff, even though it's an XP machine. My kid's E-Machine was terrible. it could hardly get out of it's own way when new, despite bargain basement dual core, and sucked badly by 2 years. When it died we went for the baddest thing on the block in terms of power, skipping the other frills and thrills, simply looking for longevity.....

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Colonel Dan,

 

There is, it;s called "Transfer", you copy it over onto yer old XP machine and either use a cable or a LAN... easy button personified.

 

Plus there is quite a bit of backward compatility, once I figured that "ownership" bit, and quit trying to be smarter than the machine... again, all my 32-bit programs run.

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Win 7 pro can run XP programs in emulation mode, some might want to check into that.

 

Never messed with Win 7, but just bought Miz Grizz a machine with it on it. She hasn't had much problem getting used to it. All of the programs she uses either came on the new machine, or were Win 7 compatible, so I didn't pay extra to get the pro version of win 7, but upgrades are relatively cheap if you need it.

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You really ought to take the time to learn to use Windows 7. Even an old fart like myself had little issues with it. It is by far the best operating system Microsoft has released in the last few years. Much better than XP.

 

I agree! I have both and there is enough similarity to allow me use either.

 

DD

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The three programs I use most, will not work on Windows 7. It may work fine but buying all new software is part of their BIG PLAN.

 

Roo

 

And after a period of time, support for XP will be discontinued and we'll have no choice but to move on to Windows 7 or whatever happens to be their next "new" operating system. Yet another part of the BIG PLAN.

 

I was happy to see that Google introduced a new browser. Although I've not seen enough of it to say much good or bad, I was never the less excited to see someone, anyone, introduce a competing product to Microsoft. I'm not anti Microsoft, but dang if everybody doesn't need some competition.

 

What I'd really like to see is a quality competing product to Microsoft Office.

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All the hassle and frustration could have been avoided had you just switched to MAC. Simple.

 

Coffinmaker

 

 

+1 :)

 

+2

I will say my DHs PC is getting closer to acting like a MAC, but it's not quite there yet. For ease of use and stability, you can't beat it.

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Talk about a learning curve, do like we had to. ME to 7. Pretty much have the hang of 7, still learning. Yours. Nota John

ME had to be the absolute worst product Microsoft ever produced, about 10 times worse than Vista. I currently have one laptop running XP, a very old one, one running Vista and finally a new one running Windows 7. Wish they were all Windows 7 but for a variety of reasons can not do it. The oldest one runs some very old software that is only XP compatible. Windows Vista is the professional version and they cost to go to Windows 7 is almost more than a new laptop. Last summer I wiped out the disk-on purpose and started everything new and it has been behaving a whole lot better. Don't use it for the internet much so it should stay that way. It had got infected with a bunch of nasty stuff and after it was gone, nothing worked well. It does now. On Windows 7 you can run software not made to run on it by running it in a special mode and it works great that way. Have a very old version of Quicken that is Windows 7 compatible and running it this way on Windows 7 works perfect.

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All the hassle and frustration could have been avoided had you just switched to MAC. Simple.

 

Coffinmaker

 

+1 I love our macs. It even makes excel easier to use with the excel for mac software.

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Howdy,

I know xp pretty well, I bought a cornfuser with 7 on it and had a real

waste of time. I took that one back and eventually found a netbook with

xp on it and bought that.

So 18 months of typing on a baby keyboard and I pick out a samsung cornfuser.

According to the owner book it has xp and can be switched and reboot to xp.

I havent done it yet.

Check it out if you dont want 7.

Best

CR

Resistance is futile.

 

Might as well embrace the suck - because it's going to happen. XP will not be supported for long, everything is moving to 64 Bit W7,

and if you start now you might learn it in time to avoid the death of non-support that will happen.

 

It's a new paradigm, but it's not near as hard as going from non-computer user to computer user, and you've done that.

 

I jumped from XP Pro to W7 after my computer made a mess on the carpet, and after recovering everything on the disk, I just anted

up and bought new H/W with W7 installed. Well worth it - and since I wanted to stay somewhat current - worth the weekend of effort

to get it figured out. Here's the thing - everything you know how to do can still be done . . .and there's a big HELP button to

take you to the place where you can do it . . . it's not like you have to learn any new concepts - just new locations for things.

 

Try adding Office 2010 to it at the same time if you really want a sphincter check! Ask me how I know!

 

MAC's are cute - sort of like those old Hewlett Packard RPN calculators that the geeks tried to convince everyone that would ask how

special they were. Or like the Beta folks, who just knew that they were technologically superior, but still proved to be a Darwinian

failure. . . . .

 

Time marches on . . . but at least we don't have to gap our spark plugs and set points and dwell every 3K miles anymore . . . . .

 

Shadow Catcher

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It took 3 hammers and chisels and a coupla' crowbars just to get me ta' let loose of muh Windows '97 and move on over ta' XP.

 

Ya' might imagine what's gonna be needed now ta' get me ta' budge any. Cause I done had a taste of 7....and I still ain't got it outta muh mouth.

 

XP does everthing that I wanted or needed. It also loaded all muh '97 software without issue. All that low-lying 7 did was cause me a headache. Not only that, but it wouldn't recognize any of muh other hardware such as a Lexmark printer, Palm Tungsten, or my external hard-drive and usb multi-port device.

 

 

 

Now they're coming out with 8.......

 

 

 

Looks like I might hav'ta take up pencil and paper again soon.

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Chili Ron, Allie Mo and Griff, Thank you for that information and encouragement..I very much appreciate it! :)

 

Deadlee, Thank you very much of the kind invitation and offer of help. I'll let you know how this drama plays out. ;)

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I had to switch from XP to 7 over the winter and I absolutely HATE it. It won't accept me digital camera or my printer, can't use Outlook Express for email. The windows won't stay maximized. Too complicated. If Bill Gates is so damn smart why can't he make a computer that's easy to use?

I'm a big believer in the KISS system and this ain't it.

 

LF

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I kind of like Windows 7. I am a digital janitor by trade (desktop support/network administrator) and Windows 7 isn't too far removed from XP. Turn off the user account control, pin internet exploiter to the start menu and you are on your way. If you have XP only programs you can set up XP mode in Windows 7. It could be described as running a computer within a computer; but you can load up your XP only software and run it from there. Buy a 64 bit machine as they don't have the 3Gb memory limits that 32 bit versions have. Buy a computer with a powerful video card as well.

Windows 8 is already on the horizon.

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