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NASA crashes satellite into asteroid, how to watch live


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NASA's Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) mission will change the trajectory of the Dimorphos asteroid by sending a spacecraft to collide with it on Monday, Sept. 26. The best part is you will be able to watch as the spacecraft makes its way through space, approaches the asteroid, and then bangs into it. 

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Right in the 10 ring.

To me the most amazing thing was watching it go from a barely discernable point of light, to seeing the larger asteroid, to seeing the pinpoint of the smaller one, to being able to discern pebbles just before impact.

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I have a question. Why does NASA, the premier advanced technological organization in the universe (as far as we know) have such a terrible TV channel? Just hideous. I frequently try to watch programs on NASA and bulk of them are really horrible. They appear to be using cameras left over from the Apollo program.

 

And now that we’ve intentionally rammed onto some innocent alien’s Recreational Vehicl we may be in for it!

If he even noticed it.

Edited by Utah Bob #35998
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10 minutes ago, Utah Bob #35998 said:

I have a question. Why does NASA, the premier advanced technological organization in the universe (as far as we know) have such a terrible TV channel? Just hideous. I frequently try to watch programs on NASA and bulk of them are really horrible. They appear to be using cameras left over from the Apollo program.

 

And now that we’ve intentionally rammed onto some innocent alien’s Recreational Vehicl we may be in for it!

If he even noticed it.

 

 

I watched on the NASA YouTube channel and it was pretty darned clear.  I want NASA to get people who can give better commentary.

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23 minutes ago, Subdeacon Joe said:

 

 

I watched on the NASA YouTube channel and it was pretty darned clear.  I want NASA to get people who can give better commentary.

I should have gone to Yousetube. Didn’t think about it.

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1 hour ago, Sedalia Dave said:

A smashing success

One heck of a Long Range side match. 

5.6 million miles!  10-month (edited) flight time.  Talk about having to calculate Coriolus Effect!

Quite a shot. 

Edited by Dusty Devil Dale
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6 minutes ago, Pat Riot, SASS #13748 said:

Do you think this is public practice for something they’ve been keeping secret?

 

Kind of hard to do a big test like this in complete secrecy. 

Let's hope not !

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4 minutes ago, Pat Riot, SASS #13748 said:

I get all my news from India. Well most o& it anyway. Well just the beef futures. 

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7 hours ago, Utah Bob #35998 said:

I get all my news from India. Well most o& it anyway. Well just the beef futures. 

Do you honestly think the US news would report that NASA says we are to be struck with an asteroid? No.
The Indians are dialed in and they report the real news. They also have a secret moon base where they will be able to strike any incoming threat, provided they can get the Nazi base to cooperate. 
You see, the Nazis established a base on the dark side of the moon shortly after 1945. Many aren’t aware of this. It’s in a documentary that you can find right on Netflix or Amazon Prime called “Iron Sky”.

The Indians and the Nazis have been feuding over some things and if they could settle their differences they could work together to take out that asteroid. 
The US new won’t tell us these things, but they know all about it. 
 

 

 

 

 

 

See, this is what happens when you forget the little roll eyes guy in prior posts…:rolleyes:

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This asteroid was 560 feet long I don’t know how deep or high it was but it seems to me that would have burned up upon entry in our atmosphere. 
I guess the idea is to do tests on the fairly smaller ones.??? The question I have was this big enough to do damage or would it have burned up?

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3 minutes ago, Rye Miles #13621 said:

This asteroid was 560 feet long I don’t know how deep or high it was but it seems to me that would have burned up upon entry in our atmosphere. 
I guess the idea is to do tests on the fairly smaller ones.??? The question I have was this big enough to do damage or would it have burned up?

 

The idea isn't to break it up but to ever so slightly change the orbit.   A tiny change in velocity or direction over millions of miles and many months generates an enormous change in where it will be.

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3 minutes ago, Subdeacon Joe said:

 

The idea isn't to break it up but to ever so slightly change the orbit.   A tiny change in velocity or direction over millions of miles and many months generates an enormous change in where it will be.

Yea I get that but it still doesn’t answer my question, would it have burned up if it entered our atmosphere? 

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2 minutes ago, Rye Miles #13621 said:

Yea I get that but it still doesn’t answer my question, would it have burned up if it entered our atmosphere? 

 

 

According to this https://physics.stackexchange.com/questions/47754/minimum-size-of-an-asteroid-to-actually-impact-earth#:~:text=As mentioned in NotAstronaut's answer,burn up in the atmosphere.

 

my guess is that anything bigger than 25 or 30 meters will impact the Earth.

 

Look at the satellites that haven't burned up.

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21 minutes ago, Rye Miles #13621 said:

This asteroid was 560 feet long I don’t know how deep or high it was but it seems to me that would have burned up upon entry in our atmosphere. 
I guess the idea is to do tests on the fairly smaller ones.??? The question I have was this big enough to do damage or would it have burned up?

 

The one that exploded over Russia in 2013 was about 60 feet long. One that's 560 feet long would probably leave a mark.

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4 minutes ago, Sixgun Sheridan said:

 

The one that exploded over Russia in 2013 was about 60 feet long. One that's 560 feet long would probably leave a mark.

 

11 minutes ago, Subdeacon Joe said:

 

 

According to this https://physics.stackexchange.com/questions/47754/minimum-size-of-an-asteroid-to-actually-impact-earth#:~:text=As mentioned in NotAstronaut's answer,burn up in the atmosphere.

 

my guess is that anything bigger than 25 or 30 meters will impact the Earth.

 

Look at the satellites that haven't burned up.

 

4 minutes ago, Sixgun Sheridan said:

 

The one that exploded over Russia in 2013 was about 60 feet long. One that's 560 feet long would probably leave a mark.

That answers my question guys! Thanks. Apparently a 560 foot asteroid is a killer!!

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17 hours ago, Subdeacon Joe said:

 

The idea isn't to break it up but to ever so slightly change the orbit.   A tiny change in velocity or direction over millions of miles and many months generates an enormous change in where it will be.


So…This may explain what is happening to my bullets at the range. Tiny little satellites whacking my bullets as they approach the bullseyes…:lol:

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On 9/26/2022 at 4:53 PM, Subdeacon Joe said:

To me the most amazing thing was watching it go from a barely discernable point of light, to seeing the larger asteroid, to seeing the pinpoint of the smaller one, to being able to discern pebbles just before impact.

 

I was wondering why the golf ball seemed to be getting bigger and bigger. And then it hit me...

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