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Lengthening shotgun forcing cones


Boomstick Bruce

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I know everyone says lengthening the forcing cone on a shotgun reduces felt recoil but what is your experience with having it done? Is it a major reduction in recoil or hardly noticable? I shoot one ounce loads at 1180fps and I handle the recoil very well. They say less is always better but is it really worth it? 

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I have one SKB 200E 12ga with 26" Barrels that was done at Briley's when they were doing some choke work.

Honestly for me, any reduction in recoil was not very noticeable.

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On old shotguns with chambers cut for roll crimp shells and paper wads, the recoil difference is significant.  Folded crimp and plastic wads were not invented until about 1960.  So guns earlier than that all had very short forcing cones.  Earlier than that, you find guns with 2-1/2" chambers.  Even much later than 1960, guns were still being chambered for roll crimp shells. Modern guns - especially 3" chambers  - probably won't see any benefit.  

 

I had a Stevens 311 that I had the chambers recut and the recoil reduction was noticeable.  I've also had a number of old doubles cut that were steel barreled smokeless powder guns.   I've not cut any of my Damascus black powder guns because I load them with roll crimp or brass hulls and black powder. 

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I have two Charles Daly 512's done by Boomstick Jay @BoomStick Jay at Boomstick Arms where he lengthened the forcing cones.  The CD 512 are very light shotguns and the reduction in felt recoil is noticeable when compared to my Stoeger which is heavier.  For the cost to have it done it was worth it in my opinion.  I also had a Kick-Ez recoil pad install which reduced felt recoil.  Two things I would do to my shotguns from here out, Kick-Ez recoil pad and lengthen the forcing cones.  The lighter CD shoots softer with the Kick-Ez and lengthened forcing cones compared to my Stoeger.

 

If you ever can make to to Central VA you are more than welcome to give my CD a try and decide for yourself. 

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The difference in felt recoil before and after is very subjective based on the individual. Lengthening the forcing cones does not reduce the recoil energy it changes how you feel it and is commonly used in sporting clays to reduce shooter fatigue and lessen wear on guns. On my Stoeger it made a noticeable difference and combined with a Kick-Ez pad really improved how I shoot it. 

    

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I had it done on my Stoeger after a shoulder injury. The recoil reduction was definitely noticeable.  Mine were lengthened about 3" I'm told. It certainly made cleaning easier without the rough machined area there in front of the chamber. However, in my case it was not cheap. I may have gotten taken a bit I think as it cost me $150 per barrel. Almost what the gun cost new!

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I had an original M1887 done, not for recoil reduction, but to lessen the pressures due to the shot column and plastic shot collar being pinched by the 2-3/4" folded crimp modern shells by the short chamber.  I don't know the extent of pressure reduction, but there were no signs of excessive pressure on examination of the fired shells.

Stay well and safe, Pards!

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20 hours ago, Boomstick Bruce said:

I know everyone says lengthening the forcing cone on a shotgun reduces felt recoil but what is your experience with having it done? Is it a major reduction in recoil or hardly noticable? I shoot one ounce loads at 1180fps and I handle the recoil very well. They say less is always better but is it really worth it? 

I believe it to be worth it in recoil reduction, especially if coupled with Back Boring.  Briley would get my vote for the two jobs.

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