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This absolutely boggles the mind.   

 

A young K9 officer on Cape Cod, with his dog, tried to serve a warrant (an arrest warrant for failure to appear for his probation appointment, and failure to appear for a drug test) on a 29 year old career criminal with 125 criminal charges on his record, including charges for illegal gun possession.  The officer was shot and killed, his dog was shot and wounded.  The suspect was arrested.

 

How is a guy with 125 arrests still free?  How does the department send one officer to arrest a guy with a lengthy felony record, especially with a history of illegal gun possession?

 

I know we need more facts, but something seems to be out of whack here.  

 

http://boston.cbslocal.com/2018/04/14/yarmouth-officer-killed-sean-gannon-criminal-justice-system/

 

 

LL

 

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I would expound on this but it would only serve to get the post deleted and I might even end up with a warning or a time out so I will just say that criminals like this guy are way too common everywhere in this country. People with records like that are what happens when you pay more attention to sports and entertainment than you do with what is going on in your government and your country.

 

Rest In Peace, Officer Sean Gannon. 

 

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I'm just gonna' keep my mouth shut!!  There is enough blame to MORE than go around here and NONE of it will do anything to bring back this valiant officer!!

 

What BMC said is as accurate as anything I might post here.

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It's what happens when corrupt judges run the legal system. They rule on things the way they want them to be, rather than what the law says(or meant when it was written).

Can't execute the scum of the earth-that's cruel and unusal punishment.

Prisons full and overflowing? Can't have that- it's cruel and unusual punishment. Turn them loose on the streets to commit MORE crimes.

Never mind what "cruel and unusual" meant when written by the framers. They were NOT talking about the death penalty.

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12 hours ago, Henry T Harrison said:

Lazy judges and lazier ADA's. Everything is plea bargained

 

 

Actually, there are some other factors.

 

The State Crime Lab had a chemist, Annie Dookhan, who developed a drug habit and regularly helped herself to drugs she was supposed to be testing; when she was discovered, her conduct resulted in the voiding of 100s of criminal convictions - some of which involved this shooter.

 

Some of the assaults were dismissed when the victims (usually his girlfriends) refused to testify.

 

More details on his record here:

 

https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2018/04/13/cop-slaying-suspect-had-violent-criminal-history-wanted-for-violating-probation-gun-charge/0VGb8jYUWP0AWDUmNrmljJ/story.html

 

LL

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12 hours ago, Tell Sackett SASS 18436 said:

It's what happens when corrupt judges run the legal system. They rule on things the way they want them to be, rather than what the law says(or meant when it was written).

Can't execute the scum of the earth-that's cruel and unusal punishment.

Prisons full and overflowing? Can't have that- it's cruel and unusual punishment. Turn them loose on the streets to commit MORE crimes.

Never mind what "cruel and unusual" meant when written by the framers. They were NOT talking about the death penalty.

 

Tell:

 

No indication of "corrupt" judges here; the one judge named in articles regarding this felon has a solid reputation as a "hard time" sentencing judge.  I don't know who the prosecuting ADA's were, and none of the details of any plea deals have been published (yet), so I can't comment on why.  We do have an automatic one year sentence for illegal gun possession, but it looks like he was never sentenced under that statute; again, not enough facts in the press to know why.

 

MA has no death penalty, nor was he ever before charged with a capital-type offense.

 

We do have a problem with over-crowded jails, and early releases do occur; no facts offered yet as to whether he ever benefited from such a release.

 

We have an even bigger issue with the mentality of legislators and parole board members regarding good and evil.  Many seem to think that violent criminals are misunderstood victims of societal inequalities, and need understanding and forgiveness more than punishment or physical isolation.  I think they are wrong.  And this killing is a pretty good illustration that they are wrong.

 

LL 

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IMHO, judges are too lenient on criminals. Sentences too short and don't fit the crime. Repeat offenders get off too easy, get out too early, and keep committing crimes.

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1 hour ago, Loophole LaRue, SASS #51438 said:

 

Tell:

 

No indication of "corrupt" judges here; the one judge named in articles regarding this felon has a solid reputation as a "hard time" sentencing judge.  I don't know who the prosecuting ADA's were, and none of the details of any plea deals have been published (yet), so I can't comment on why.  We do have an automatic one year sentence for illegal gun possession, but it looks like he was never sentenced under that statute; again, not enough facts in the press to know why.

 

MA has no death penalty, nor was he ever before charged with a capital-type offense.

 

We do have a problem with over-crowded jails, and early releases do occur; no facts offered yet as to whether he ever benefited from such a release.

 

We have an even bigger issue with the mentality of legislators and parole board members regarding good and evil.  Many seem to think that violent criminals are misunderstood victims of societal inequalities, and need understanding and forgiveness more than punishment or physical isolation.  I think they are wrong.  And this killing is a pretty good illustration that they are wrong.

 

LL 

Having spent 30 years as a detective easily 90% of my cases were plea bargained away no matter how serious or how much evidence there was. And of course the gun charge was always the first to go.

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43 minutes ago, Sedalia Dave said:

I wonder if the office was made fully aware of the shooters arrest history before being sent to serve the warrant.

 

There is a good chance he wasn't. When told by dispatch to serve a warrant, I would first search the subject in our data base. If there was anything that was a red flag, I'd request additional units.

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2 hours ago, Henry T Harrison said:

No officer should ever serve any warrant without back up!

 

+1        Although, I didn't see mention of the fact that he was alone.  Did I miss that?

 

I don't recall ever being sent to serve an arrest warrant with less than 4 officers.  We, also, were only sent to execute arrest warrants on felonies and always did a check for priors before heading out.  

 

If a warrant popped up while we were out on a call or traffic stop, well, stuff happens.

 

Angus

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22 hours ago, Tell Sackett SASS 18436 said:

It's what happens when corrupt judges run the legal system. They rule on things the way they want them to be, rather than what the law says(or meant when it was written).

Can't execute the scum of the earth-that's cruel and unusal punishment.

Prisons full and overflowing? Can't have that- it's cruel and unusual punishment. Turn them loose on the streets to commit MORE crimes.

Never mind what "cruel and unusual" meant when written by the framers. They were NOT talking about the death penalty.

I wholeheartedly agree!

 

 

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6 hours ago, Black Angus McPherson said:

 

+1        Although, I didn't see mention of the fact that he was alone.  Did I miss that?

 

I don't recall ever being sent to serve an arrest warrant with less than 4 officers.  We, also, were only sent to execute arrest warrants on felonies and always did a check for priors before heading out.  

 

If a warrant popped up while we were out on a call or traffic stop, well, stuff happens.

 

Angus

 

That's one of the frustrating missing facts from the press reports; they do not clearly state if others were there at the time or  not.  Some give the impression that there was a larger operation in progress, including a search of the house, leading to the discovery of the suspect in the attic; others make it sound that the search occurred after the shooting, when additional police responded.  Maybe tomorrow will bring more detail.

 

LL

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Seems odd they would send a K-9 officer and his dog alone just to serve a warrant. Wouldn't that indicate a larger operation and the suspect was hiding? Otherwise, why the dog? The immediate arrest would indicate other officers were on the scene. 

 

The view from my speculative armchair with little information.

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