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Alpo

Electricity in the old west

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How did they charge the batteries for the telegraph?

 

IMG_20200224_213504.thumb.jpg.31c0e43bb3fd4fde67a1e01b50a691be.jpg

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3 minutes ago, Subdeacon Joe said:

That’s what I was thinking as well after reading the link I posted. 

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55 minutes ago, Pat Riot, SASS #13748 said:

That’s what I was thinking as well after reading the link I posted. 

 

 

LOL!  You must have been searching and doing your cut and past just as I hit "Submit Reply" since we posted the same link.

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The same way they recharged Baghdad Batteries a couple thousand years ago I guess. 

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When we visited Bodie, CA the Park Ranger told us how when they got one of the first electricity systems in the area they ran the lines as straight as they could because there was some concerned about the electricity going around corners. And when they got to a building, they just popped a couple holes in the wall and ran the wires inside.

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17 minutes ago, Clay Mosby said:

When we visited Bodie, CA the Park Ranger told us how when they got one of the first electricity systems in the area they ran the lines as straight as they could because there was some concerned about the electricity going around corners. And when they got to a building, they just popped a couple holes in the wall and ran the wires inside.

 

That's why most electricians level up receptacles, switches, panel, etc.....otherwise the electricity all runs to one side.

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10 hours ago, Alpo said:

How did they charge the batteries for the telegraph?

 


Um — run a cable to the top of the clock tower to catch a lightning bolt and generate the needed 1.21 gigawatts.

 
 

 

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The early batteries by Edison were nickel/iron. Used caustic not acid. Lasted almost indefinitely. Were often used in submarines except low voltage per cell and heavy. We gave up on lead acid off grid batteries a few yeas ago and now use nickel/iron. No acid corrosion and last almost forever. After about 20 years drain the caustic, replace and they are like new.  Also in the early days on the great planes they used windmills like the ones used for pumping water with generator heads to produce electricity. 

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5 hours ago, Cypress Sun said:

 

That's why most electricians level up receptacles, switches, panel, etc.....otherwise the electricity all runs to one side.

That's why on long runs I like my conduit to run slightly down hill. It helps the electricity flow a little better.

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That would make sense for direct current - it only goes one way so I can see helping it go downhill.

 

But my house is alternating current. It goes out and comes back, right? That's why it's alternating? So if it flows downhill, it has to climb back uphill. :huh:

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21 hours ago, Pat Riot, SASS #13748 said:

That is a very good question:)

 

 

 

 

 

Don't encourage him, Pat.

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10 hours ago, Alpo said:

That would make sense for direct current - it only goes one way so I can see helping it go downhill.

 

But my house is alternating current. It goes out and comes back, right? That's why it's alternating? So if it flows downhill, it has to climb back uphill. :huh:

https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/alternating-current-ac-vs-direct-current-dc/all

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12 hours ago, Alpo said:

That would make sense for direct current - it only goes one way so I can see helping it go downhill.

 

But my house is alternating current. It goes out and comes back, right? That's why it's alternating? So if it flows downhill, it has to climb back uphill. :huh:

Direct current flows in a loop.  It has to come back, either via a second wire or by an earth ground.  Half the trip is still up hill.

 

Duffield

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6 hours ago, Duffield, SASS #23454 said:

Direct current flows in a loop.  It has to come back, either via a second wire or by an earth ground.  Half the trip is still up hill.

 

Duffield

That's true, but by then the electricity has done its job and is lighter, therefore it's easier to push uphill!

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