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The real YellowHammer

Bullet diameter

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Hello, 

I just got into CAS and was looking to start reloading ammo, because that seems to be the best way to get the low recoil loads everyone uses. 
I have two sass model Ruger new Vaqueros and a modern Marlin 1894c, all chambered in .357. I have been shooting HSM 158gr. Round nose flat point .38 specials out of pistol and rifle. They seem to run fine in all the guns, but I would like to reload maybe some 110 grainers or something lighter. While searching online I noticed there are .356, .357, .358 diameter bullets available, and wasn’t sure what to get. While searching the wire for this question I saw a lot of debate on round nose flat vs truncated bullets, but didn’t really understand ( mainly folks just wanted to say what the “best was”) if anyone cares to elaborate on that, it would be awesome.
 

if anyone has any info on bullet diameter please help!?

also if anyone wouldn’t mind sharing their own specs on similar loads, that they use it would be greatly appreciated. 
 

Thank you in advance

 

Yellowhammer

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.358 is what you need. 

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How about loading your .38 special loads with 125 grain bullets for a while and see how they run in your rifle.   Immediately trying to start with the ultra-light slugs in that Marlin rifle may be quite a challenge.   Just moving from 158 grain bullets to 125 will be a big enough jump to make you do some adjusting in your plans.  Don't be afraid to try both the RNFP and the TC (truncated cone) slugs.

 

Find a cowboy pard in your local area who reloads, and have him show you the ropes.  You will save time and money both.

 

And, yes, you want 0.358" diameter lead or poly-coated bullets.   0.356 would be for 9mm.    0.357 is for folks who are confused :o or want to load them for both 9mm and .38 caliber guns.  :lol:

 

Good luck, GJ

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I use a 125 grain RNFP pushed by 3.0 grains of Red Dot or 3.5 grains of Trail Boss. Winchester primers.

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I use 125 gr. TC bullets sized .358" over 3gr of Red Dot.  I use that load in pistols and rifles.  I haven't found a need for anything else. I know there are other combinations that are equally good,  your mileage may vary.

Blackfoot

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Hey!!!!!! I don't use low recoil loads!!!!! Everyone doesn't use them!!!   :wub: There are quite a few of us Holy Black wart hogs that love the gouts of flame and dense black smoke from our olden day cowboy guns!!!  :D

 

IMHO, it would be incredibly boring firing light smokeless .32s and .38s along with wimpy 12s!!!  :angry:

 

Luckily, SASS provides for us all. I follow my maternal grandmother's aphorism: "Everyone to their own taste said the old lady as she kissed the cow."

 

:)

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.358 diam..........125 gr with 3.5 grains of Tite-Group.

 

It's not an especially light load, kinda snappy!!;)

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125 gr. RNFP over 3.5 gr. of Trail Boss. That's what I use in my Marlins, and they run nice and smooth.

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125Gr Truncated Cone.  3f APP to the bullet base.  .38 Spl case.

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.358 in lead; has to do with bullet/rifling and pressure. .356 would "rattle" down the barrel (not really) and not be very accurate.

.357 would probably be fine for jacketed; doesn't compress like lead. (for the non-cowboy shootin')

These are for .38 Spl/.357Mag chambered firearms.

Diameter of bullet coupled with substance of bullet depends on bore diameter of barrel and type of shooting.

Talk to long range BPCR (black powder cartridge rifle) shooters; they know way more about bullet and bore diameters than we ever need to know.

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1 hour ago, High Spade Mikey Wilson said:

125 gr. RNFP over 3.5 gr. of Trail Boss. That's what I use in my Marlins, and they run nice and smooth.

What is OAL for this round?

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Well I knew I came to the right place! Thank you everyone for there advice. :) it means a lot, hopefully we’ll see ya at a match somewhere!

 

YellowHammer

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10 minutes ago, The real YellowHammer said:

Well I knew I came to the right place! Thank you everyone for there advice. :) it means a lot, hopefully we’ll see ya at a match somewhere!

 

YellowHammer

 

I strongly urge you to find a mentor in your cowboy club for guidance. 

I say this, as someone who has been reloading for 55+ years.

Also, take lots of notes. 

OLG 

 

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20 hours ago, Old Ranger said:

What is OAL for this round?

 

Ranger, I use 1.380" OAL

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I will second what Lumpy said about a mentor. Lot of good pards at CTS , I know , I was a regular there from about Sept. 2008 until last Feb.

Tell 'em all howdy from Rex. :D

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tnNLR0Sm.jpg

 

Hard to beat this bullet shape for smooth feeding in a "66 or "73.

 

OAL of 1.5" 

 

For hip guns it's hard to beat 125's in 38 Long Colt brass. Trail Boss (2.5 gr) for 700 fps, decent Es/Sd. In a pinch I've used wadcutters in 38 Spl brass as well, they don't look too Cowboy, but they are easy to load and shoot well. Make sure to have some lead showing, flush with mouth not allowed.

 

I bought a 6 cavity LEE, 358-148-WC, makes a pile of bullets in no time at all, almost boring. I use the same 2.5 gr as for my LC ammo, for 640 fps.

 

BB

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