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So, a hunting buddy down in New Orleans emailed today, letting me know that he has purchased a tract of hunting land in Mississippi. Previously, he had leases on hunting areas in paper company lands in Georgia, where we hunted whitetails.

 

In addition to deer, he tells me that there are huge groups of hogs! Now, being a white-collared Northern boy, I haven't hunted hogs (yet), but certainly want to. He tells me that I need a $300 out-of-state license, and that the state permits 365/24/7 hunting of hogs (as nuisance animals), and also allows the use of lights and shooting from vehicles! Now, that's downright amazing by local standards, where such behavior will land you in jail! It also sounds like a whole barrel full of fun!

 

So, how about some input from you Southern hog hunters?

 

Rifle and ammo recommendations? Will my 5.56 M&P15 do the job with the right ammo? And what would that be? Or should I be looking at a different gun (go ahead; LL loves to dream about new guns!) I have been eye-balling a 1876 in .45-60.....

 

Do you recommend lights or night vision or day light?

 

Elevated stands?

 

General guidance for somebody who has, to this point, obtained his bacon from the supermarket?

 

It's been awhile since I've been stirred up like this......many thanks in advance!

 

LL

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I killed over a hundred porkers with a 22 LR. It's all in shot placement. Put one behind the ear.

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The 5.56 will take them down fine.I have use a 22mag,a 22,my 92,44 mag. my son's 45-70.You can use any gun you want,hunt with lights,dogs,from a truck,from and stand.I sat on my front porch.In Texas shoot them when you see them with what ever gun you have handy.Good luck and have fun.

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I've killed several hogs with a 22LR as well but they were in a pen getting ready to be butchered. I believe in the old saying, "Take enough gun". A feral hog is a sturdy, tough animal that if hit poorly can be a nightmare. They notoriously leave a skimpy blood trail and can and will turn and wait for the tracker. I shot one with a broadhead arrow a few years back. He went about 30 yards then turned and laid down watching it's back trail. We fortunately waited an hour before trailing. DRT

You get somewhere where there is a bit of Russian in the blood line and they suddenly become dangerous game.

Another factor is the vitals are not where you expect them to be. They tend to be farther forward and hidden under the shoulder blade.

They are considered vermin in most locals but are in fact a worthy game animal.

Missouri allows 24/7 with special restrictions on hunting them during deer and turkey seasons. the only permit required is a valid hunting license either small or large game.

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Been a LONG time (about 52 years!) but in Tennessee, on feral and European wild boar, .30-06 and .33WCF put 'em down quick! Range was between 10 ft. and 10 yds in heavy timber (well, close-together sapling trees!).

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The 1876 in 45-60 would work well. I know a few that hunt them with 454 Casuls, 45-70s, and similar cartridges. Use a massive hunk of lead that looks more like a semi wad cutter than anything else. Shoot hot loads and aim for the shoulder bones. Contest is to see how far the hog flies when hit.

 

Feral hogs are rapidly becoming the most destructive species in the South. Won't be too many more years till they are in the North as well.

 

BTW One of the perks of hunting them in Texas is that you can hunt them from Helicopters.

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Feral hogs are rapidly becoming the most destructive species in the South. Won't be too many more years till they are in the North as well.

 

It's a pity they don't eat kudzu.

 

They're in Pennsylvania now, and we expect them in New York soon. Guess it's time to get a hunting license.

 

What do you think? Mosin-Nagant or PSL?

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How about a .577 Muzzlestuffer?

 

Big medicine for bad breath.

Nope. They travel in herds. You can get more than one with a repeater.

Even more with claymore but that's not zackly legal.

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Noz, Anytime you need someone to shoot Missouri Pigs with you just holler. We don't seem to have them up here in the Columbia area and I do so like pork.

Just beware thet brucellosis is pretty common. Take care when dressing and cooking them.

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Back in the 80s. Marlin Glenfield model 60. Got thisn betwixt the headlights. Not recommended placement but it was the only shot I had.

qJ67rR.jpg

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Just beware thet brucellosis is pretty common. Take care when dressing and cooking them.

Had not heard that.

Googled it and was surprised at just how common it is in feral hogs and how easy it is to catch.

 

What surprised me the most is that if you catch it it is very difficult to treat.

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Had not heard that.

Googled it and was surprised at just how common it is in feral hogs and how easy it is to catch.

What surprised me the most is that if you catch it it is very difficult to treat.

Yeah, it can be a life changing thing. Not pleasant.

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thinking I would like a tad more gun

 

CB

 

Me too. But were were required by the department to use 22s.
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been around a few wild hogs , them be tough critters

 

Grandpa used a .38 to put down pigs he'd raised to slaughter. He said one took three shots to kill it. He shot it once in the forehead and it went down, but while he was trying to get a rope around its feet to hang it up it woke up and started kicking and squealing. He shot it again in the forehead and it did it again. The third shot he put behind its ear and it stayed down. When he butchered it he went looking for the slugs in its head and found the skull was twice as thick as on the other pigs he'd slaughtered. The first two shots hadn't penetrated the skull; they just flattened out against the bone under the skin.

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Feral hogs are hard to take out for couple of reasons. The boars will slash pines with their tusks and rub the sap on their shoulders. It hardens like armor. It's thought that this helps protect them in their mating season fights. Their skulls are pretty thick in the front and steeply angled, making a tough shot from the front. Placement is really critical.

I hear all the stories about hoe aggressive they are but Ionly had one charge me. He was about the size of a VW and I finally put him down with a .357 to the cabesa.

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A penned domestic pig is ridiculously easy to put down with a .22 to the brain. Feral pigs outside a pen are a whole nuther story. Not that they're all that much tougher skull wise but they are really hard to hit on the move.

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That marksman works that bolt action faster that a lot of CAS shooter do their lever actions. :excl: :excl: :excl:

 

I haven't see someone that good working the bolt and hitting targets since I was in high school.

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I shot one that was charging me while deer hunting 40 years ago with my S&W Model 13 .357 with 125 gr hollow point. Two rounds to the skull, both bounced off the plate over the eyes, 3rd round behind the head took it down. 150lbs live weight. I had the shakes for about three weeks. If you are not used to them I would recommend at least 30 cal. A .223 will do it if you put the round in the eye, ear or back of the neck. My youngest took one with .243 and 80 gr. bullet at 300 yrds a few years ago. The ones I have taken I usually use my .270 or the 30-06. Though if you are shooting a lot, recoil gets old fast.

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Farmer:

 

That is amazing!! And those look like actual wild boar, not just feral pigs.

 

He's a great shot.

 

LL

 

 

That marksman works that bolt action faster that a lot of CAS shooter do their lever actions. :excl: :excl: :excl:

 

I haven't see someone that good working the bolt and hitting targets since I was in high school.

 

I was pretty impressed, to say the least.

 

One of those rifles was a 300 win mag too. I'm here to tell you, that's not a friendly rifle for that kinda shooting.

 

Dude is good!

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Farmer, that was a good video. My nephews wife wants my brother and I to come south to hunt pigs down there. Guess I will have to give it a try. Looks like good hunting.

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I used to be almost that fast with a bolt action pre-64 Model 70 Winchester in .30-06. Used the recoil to help work the action after lifting the bolt. But that was almost 50 years ago, and I'm badly out of practice. That was a great movie! The toughest one is when the range is about six yards and the critter is coming straight at you like a steam locomotive! The tough part isn't hitting it, just keeping your cool to get good placement! For close up in heavy brush, I prefer a lever action or semi-auto (Tanker M-1 Garand)! Oh, and unlike a bull, boars charge with their eyes open! So don't think of trying to dodge like a bullfighter! Keep a tree handy to duck behind...or pull yourself up on. Never had to do that myself. Down to central Tennessee, half-century ago, we hunted with dogs or still-hunted. You know how to make a good boar dog? Breed's not too important. They used Plott hounds, black & tan coonhounds, etc. If the dog survives the first encounter with a boar, he/she will be a boar dog forever! Trick is to try not to hit the dog(s)! First one I shot was a European. Dogs chased it, and I chased the dogs. Critter pulled up and stopped fighting the dogs for about five seconds. Dogs backed off, and I got a clear profile shot at about 10 feet! A 180 gr Remington RN CorLokt took it right behind the left shoulder, into the lungs, and down it went! Next trip down there I took a M1886 in .33WCF. At about 25 yds still-hunting, I took one down with a lung shot, but the bullet overpenetrated and got a second hawg standing behind the first one so I couldn't see it! Had to finish it. Same hunt I had a feral that must have weighed 400 lbs on the hoof. It was running along a fence, and I swung to follow it, but there was a sapling about two inches closer than the muzzle, and caught the barrel. Fortunately, I didn't fire, or I might have hit it in the guts. Last time I had a rifle (other than a 6mm Remington for antelope) that had a barrel longer than 22 inches! Ah, those were the days...

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Thought better and deleted

Lets just say that some tv shows on the sportsman's channel that feature pig hunting show slob hunters at their best

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I'm a Mississippi hog hunter. A 5.56mm is fine for hunting from a vehicle or a stand. The .300 Blackout is very popular around here. If I'm on the ground with them, I use a .30-30 or 45-70. I know some hunters who use a 12 ga slug. Hogs less than 100 lbs are good eating, especially if they have been feeding on acorns or deer corn. Hunting with dogs? Use a pistol. The dogs keep the hog occuppied and you can walk up for a close kill shot.

 

Hogs in the Delta are Russian boar crosses. In the early 1900's boars were imported for hunting by the wealthy planters. Those are the boars you have to worry about, especially if you are hunting swamp land.

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Noz, Anytime you need someone to shoot Missouri Pigs with you just holler. We don't seem to have them up here in the Columbia area and I do so like pork.

Problem is that they are about like a whitetail as far as difficulty. Nose like a blood hound ears like an owl and run like a scalded dog.

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Farmer:

 

That is amazing!! And those look like actual wild boar, not just feral pigs.

 

He's a great shot.

 

LL

They are. He's hunting in Germany. He is also hunting from a raised platform called a "high seat" overlooking a known travel pattern and more than likely has drivers moving them to him.

That said, he's a hellova shot.

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Just beware thet brucellosis is pretty common. Take care when dressing and cooking them.

Yup. What's known in humans as Undulant Fever. Trichinosis is common and rabies is a good possibility. Got to be careful with the carcases but cooked is OK.

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