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Which would you do?


Alpo

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You have an old gun. 80 to 100 years, maybe even older. And you use this gun. This is not a collector where you just have it and look at it. You actually use it.

 

A part breaks.

 

You have your choice of replacing it with an original, 80-to-100 years or maybe even older, part, which costs an ungodly amount of money. Or a new-made part, which is much cheaper, but then the gun would not be original.

 

Which part would you buy?

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What, like, "This is my grandfather's hammer. I've replaced the handle three times and the head once"?

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13 minutes ago, Alpo said:

This is not a collector where you just have it and look at it. You actually use it.

 

There's your answer....fix it with the new part and don't worry about it.

 

Re: The Paradox.  Sort of like people who "restore" a warbird from two bolts, a gauge, and two square feet of wing panel.  Is it really a restoration when 99 44/100 is new fabrication?

 

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Posted (edited)

 

Depends upon the price of the replacement part and the value of the gun.

I'd buy both if they were reasonably priced.

 

Edit - I would not alter the gun to "fit" a newer manufactured part if I could in any way avoid it, I would go with an original part preferably in that case.

Edited by Cypress Sun
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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Cypress Sun said:

Edit - I would not alter the gun to "fit" a newer manufactured part if I could in any way avoid it, I would go with an original part preferably in that case.

Me neither. I would buy more parts then.

Off topic but related, I am playing with the thought of a trigger job on an SKS I have. I know, it is not a drop-safe gun. Any "improvement" may make it less safe. I will buy a complete set of parts. That way I can put the original cruddy gritty heavy less-unsafe trigger assembly back in when I mess it up.

Edited by John Kloehr
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I’d make it shoot reliably. Replace, repair, or fabricate, it doesn’t matter.

 

I’ve been known to spend a whole day, reproducing a parking brake pawl for an old disc brake assembly that would have cost $100.00+ for a piece the size of a .45 Colt cartridge.

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I love answering a question with a question, and I shoot original shooter-grade Winchesters...

Is this a part that 80-100 years to break (replace with original), or a part that has previously replaced with an original part (replace with new).

 

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The gun in question is a VIS P-35. They were only made from 1935 to 1944, so this particular gun is between 80 and 90 years old.

 

He broke the slide stop. As he put it, how in the hell do you break a slide stop?

 

He had two choices of replacement. An original part or a reproduction part.

 

He went with the original, for $104.

 

I'm pretty sure I would have gone with the repro for about 25. He doesn't say what the repro cost, but based on slide stops for a 1911, I'm guessing 25 to 30. A whole lot less than 104.

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If it were me, and remember I'm a COB, (Cheap Old Ba$tard), I'd get the new part. It's just a shooter, so no particular collector value.

If he were to replace the grips with new grips, how would that affect the value? Probably not much. And if I'm replacing broken, 100 year old parts, what makes me think the the replacement, 100 year old part, is any better that the one that broke? If it's well used, (worn), it might not even function. 

It kind of reminds me of articles I used to read where the author took his worn out, 1st generation Colt to a gun builder, and had him replace the barrel, cylinder, and all the internals to have a "better" gun. It's certainly not an "original" gun anymore, but the serial number comes back to a 1st generation Colt. 

I've been to gun shows, looking at an older gun that was in good shape, just to have some sanctimonious "expert" stop to tell me, "You know that's been reblued, right?" They usually go pale when I say something like, "Good. I hope it shoots as good as it looks."  "Collector" value means nothing to me. I buy guns to shoot them. 

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Little more update on the gun. Grandpa took it off a German in the 40s. The slide stop was broken when he got it. It's been sitting in a dresser drawer for 80 years.

 

Apparently they decided to put it back in working order. In that case, I would probably buy an original part also.

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Posted (edited)
13 hours ago, Alpo said:

You have an old gun. 80 to 100 years, maybe even older. And you use this gun. This is not a collector where you just have it and look at it. You actually use it.

 

A part breaks.

 

You have your choice of replacing it with an original, 80-to-100 years or maybe even older, part, which costs an ungodly amount of money. Or a new-made part, which is much cheaper, but then the gun would not be original.

 

Which part would you buy?

Both.  One to put in the gun to shoot, the other to sell with it if someone gets fussy over originality.....like Alpo said.

Edited by Forty Rod SASS 3935
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4 hours ago, Alpo said:

Little more update on the gun. Grandpa took it off a German in the 40s. The slide stop was broken when he got it. It's been sitting in a dresser drawer for 80 years.

 

Apparently they decided to put it back in working order. In that case, I would probably buy an original part also.

What "exactly" is an original part?

 

Is it the actual part that firearm was built with?

 

Or is it simply a part that was made in the same time period as the firearm?

 

Or what if the part never changed and a part made yesterday (by the same company) is an exact duplicate and drop in for the part from 75 years ago?

 

Is that still an original part?

 

In my opinion - once something is no longer original; there is no obligation to "pretend" that it still is or treat it as such.

 

Doesn't necessarily make it better or worse - but takes away the pressure of worrying about it.

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Posted (edited)

 

What is to say that the broken part had not already been replaced in the lifetime of the gun.

 

As to the  original question, I would buy the new part.

 

Edited by Sawhorse Kid
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4 hours ago, Creeker, SASS #43022 said:

What "exactly" is an original part?

That's an interesting question.

 

A lodge brother of my father's was both a gunsmith and a machinist. And I noticed one day that he had a 73 Winchester. This was long before SASS. Right around the bicentennial - 76 or 7 maybe. When it was just an old gun.

 

He told me that he used it for parts. Frequently he had people come to him with a 73 with a busted part of some sort or other. And he would disassemble his, get his part, and then use it as a pattern to make a new part, which he would then put in the customer's gun.

 

Friend of mine is a welder. Another friend had a rifle that had been his father's. And a part broke. Parts were completely unavailable. He asked if I knew anyone that could fix it, so I took it to John. And after attempting to weld it three or four times, they gave up on it and machined a new part.

 

 

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