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American arms 1860 Henry


Sebastian Blud
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Just pick up an American arms 1860 Henry in 45 colt. Now I'm "new" to the 1860s . Shot some never owned one. So I know nothing about them. Their quirks or anything. So what do I look for? Are they worth it for SASS? Should I just trade or sale for something better?

This one doesn't have any place for a sling either. And seems the barrel has become plum color over the years. Has a few bumps and scratches but I figured it was a shooter grade rifle.

All my 45 colt loads are low power and lead so I'm not worried about that. 

KIMG0416.JPG

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Two things. 
Make a plug that takes up the remaining space in the magazine. The directions have been on here multiple times. If you make the plug, you don’t have to do the Henry Hop. 
Always stage the rifle with the follower back from the edge of the table. Supposedly someone had a magazine ignition when the follower caught on the table edge and snapped back. Some clubs may not allow the 1860 because of that. 
I have one that I use once in a while when I was to be a classical classic cowboy. It pairs well with my 1872 open tops. 

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1 hour ago, Sebastian Blud said:

Just pick up an American arms 1860 Henry in 45 colt. Now I'm "new" to the 1860s . Shot some never owned one. So I know nothing about them. Their quirks or anything. So what do I look for? Are they worth it for SASS? Should I just trade or sale for something better?

This one doesn't have any place for a sling either. And seems the barrel has become plum color over the years. Has a few bumps and scratches but I figured it was a shooter grade rifle.

All my 45 colt loads are low power and lead so I'm not worried about that. 

KIMG0416.JPG

 

I am not sure, but I think American Arms was just another importer of Uberti rifles.    The Henry is a fun gun to shoot, albeit with a *slightly* greater learning curve than something like a 73.

That being said, take it out and shoot it.   You will probably enjoy it.   Many will suggest that you get a "spacer" so you don't have to do the "Henry Hop."  I agree with this suggestion, and have such a spacer myself.   

Your rifle looks pretty nice and it should serve you well.

Edited by H. K. Uriah, SASS #74619
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I really enjoy shooting the 1860 Henry, and it has became my main match rifle more or less.  Just a classic design.  I don't use the spacer stick, or do the Henry hop myself... But a different technique.  Great rifle and they can run well in competition, made the Top 10 in Classic Cowboy Category at Nationals shooting one with 72 Open Tops.

 

Shoot it and Enjoy!  

 

 

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Mine was imported by North Kansas City Arms made by Uberti. I’ve been shooting it for years in CAS matches. The action is the same as the other Uberti toggle link rifles, so it can be slicked up like the ‘73s & ‘66s, should that appeal to you. 
 

It should say Uberti on the lower tang. 
 

The plum color is cool!

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i have the 1860 as does my good friend and we have shot them in SASS but im not as fond of mine as my friend is his , they are a fine rifle for the venue except for the loading issues and the follower hop - all easily overcome if your willing to do the effort , they are a fine rifle - and im fond of the 45 colt as well , thats what we both have , 

Edited by watab kid
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I shoot my Henrys more often than I should (although I love the Henry) because my pesky little brother always goads me into it. (You know you do, Major.) :P I think they pair perfectly with black powder, open tops and an '87.

 

I use the spacer stick to avoid the "Henry hop" and it works fine. Major is one of the most consistent and fastest Henry shooters I've seen, he's got the grip figgered out and does not use a spacer, do the hop or slow down or miss targets. That guy is an anomoly with the Henry though. He regularly beats classics who shoot '73s. And I hear tell he wants more Henrys to play with. (Might be something off under his cowboy hat sometimes. :D Pa musta dropped him in the horse trough one too many times...)

 

The Henry is a great CAS rifle choice and when you adapt to its nuances you'll really grow to like shooting it. They are unique and different enough that you always earn style points with it (style points never helped my match scores though ) and probably become an Old Skool gun nut like some of the rest of us wandering, lost Classics. 

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Welcome to the "Henry shooters". When I started in SASS in 1994, I started with a Henry, and have been mostly shooting the Henry as my main match rifle ever since.  My Current Henry is a .44-40 HRA "New Original Henry" which is Henry Repeating Arms version of the 1860.  Fit and finish is better than Uberti, and much slicker from the factory than the Italian ones, too.

 

I don't use a spacer, just use the Henry Hop.  I must confess, though, as of late I have been using my .44-40 Marlin 1894 Century Limited as a main match rifle also!

The gang.jpeg

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I have a Uberti-made, Navy Arms Imported M1860 Military Henry (which has a sling swivel, and enjoyed shooting it for many years in SASS matches.  As time marched on, I switched to Rossi M92's with 20-inch barrels because the Henry is a bit muzzle heavy, and my ol' back has problems balancing it. :(

 

Now, a couple of procedures you MUST follow when loading your Henry.  Whether you use a spacer in the magazine or not, move the follower until you can turn the muzzle cap to the side.  KEEP THE BARREL NEARLY HORIZONTAL AS YOU SLIDE THE CARTRIDGES INTO THE MAGAZINE TUBE.  Do NOT drop the cartridges down the magazine with the barrel vertical, or anything nearly vertical.  If you do use a spacer, load the rounds first and slide the spacer in GENTLY.  Before releasing the follower, WRAP YOUR LEFT HAND (assuming you are right handed) AROUND THE MAGAZINE ABOUT THREE FINGER WIDTHS ABOVE EITHER THE LAST CARTRIDGE OR ABOVE THE SPACER. USE YOUR RIGHT HAND TO RELEASE THE FOLLOWER AND ROTATE IT INTO POSITION, KEEPING YOUR RIGHT THUMB AND FOREFINGER ON THE FOLLOWER TAB.  NOW, GENTLY LOWER THE FOLLOWER UNTIL IT RESTS ON THE BULLET OR THE SPACER.

By wrapping your hand around the magazine and the barrel, so that it blocks the follower from slamming down on the row of cartridges in case your right hand

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21 hours ago, Sebastian Blud said:

Just pick up an American arms 1860 Henry in 45 colt. Now I'm "new" to the 1860s . Shot some never owned one. So I know nothing about them. Their quirks or anything. So what do I look for? Are they worth it for SASS? Should I just trade or sale for something better?

This one doesn't have any place for a sling either. And seems the barrel has become plum color over the years. Has a few bumps and scratches but I figured it was a shooter grade rifle.

All my 45 colt loads are low power and lead so I'm not worried about that. 

KIMG0416.JPG

Depends on what your competitive aspirations are.  If you're going to overall wins, then I'd advise against the 1860.  But if your aims are not as lofty, then the 1860 can fit right in with huge style points... (worthless in match scoring, but priceless to one's ego)!  Even more better when you pair it with C&B revolvers and shoot in a black powder category!  And since cap guns and BP are legal in EVERY category, there's no limit to your fun!  I've shot mine in just about every category I'm qualified for (some age categories are beyond my truth stretching abilities!  My wife may have thought I acted like I was twelve occasionally, no Match Director knows me that well to let sign up as a Junior)!  And I simply not rushing to stretch beyond my Elder Statesman self!

 

However, just like a '73 or '66 it will benefit with some replacement "go-fast" parts.  I just recently installed a short stroke kit in mine (after 14 years), and had already added lightened lever & lifter return springs 

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3 hours ago, Trailrider #896 said:

KEEP THE BARREL NEARLY HORIZONTAL AS YOU SLIDE THE CARTRIDGES INTO THE MAGAZINE TUBE.  Do NOT drop the cartridges down the magazine with the barrel vertical, or anything nearly vertical.  If you do use a spacer, load the rounds first and slide the spacer in GENTLY.  Before releasing the follower, WRAP YOUR LEFT HAND (assuming you are right handed) AROUND THE MAGAZINE ABOUT THREE FINGER WIDTHS ABOVE EITHER THE LAST CARTRIDGE OR ABOVE THE SPACER. USE YOUR RIGHT HAND TO RELEASE THE FOLLOWER AND ROTATE IT INTO POSITION, KEEPING YOUR RIGHT THUMB AND FOREFINGER ON THE FOLLOWER TAB.  NOW, GENTLY LOWER THE FOLLOWER UNTIL IT RESTS ON THE BULLET OR THE SPACER.

By wrapping your hand around the magazine and the barrel, so that it blocks the follower from slamming down on the row of cartridges in case your right hand should slip.

@Sebastian Blud this statement is very important when using an 1860.

Edited by Cowtown Scout, SASS #53540 L
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When the current Henry Arms Co started marketing their Big Boy line of rifles. Until they started making their “Original Henry”, their rifles had nothing in common with toggle link action of the 1860. 

 

Edited by Abilene Slim SASS 81783
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51 minutes ago, H. K. Uriah, SASS #74619 said:

Just out of curiosity, where did the convention of referring to a Henry as an 1860 come from?

In order to no confuse the original with the "Johnny-come-lately" Henrys.  And it's long been known as the "Henry Model 1860."

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The Henry Repeating Arms "New Original Henry" is a true 1860 design, like the Ubertis.  While more expensive than a Uberti, the wood is all figured walnut, deeper bluing, better polished and slicker than snot.....  I had an Uberti 1860, and thought it was all Henry hype, UNTIL I got one,  WOW!  The Uberti is like a Chevy compared to the HRAs being a BMW

 

BTW. The original was just named "Henry Repeating Rifle", in honor of Winchester's Hew Haven Arms plant chief engineer, B Tyler Henry, who patented the design in 1860 (production started in 1861, IIRC).  13,000 were produced, of which about 11,000 + were used in the In the Civil War, where it was called "The Horizontal Shot Tower," "Fifteen shooter" or "That Damn Yankee Rifle you load on Sunday and shoot all week"!

 

It later picked up the 1860 handle to differentiate it from the Model of 1866, the NEW IMPROVED HENRY, or it as it was just called that or Winchester .44 caliber repeating rifle when it came out. (It had other names: "Yellow Boy," "Sixteen Shooter"  or "Spirit Rifle of many Voices." ) When the Model of 1873 came out, the early ones began being called either 1860 (Henry) or 1866 (Winchester).

Edited by Tuolumne Lawman 6127
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Comparison of Uberti Henry (top) vs HRA Henry (Bottom).  Not the finer polishing of the HRA receiver and barrel, as opposed to the Uberti.  Last two are the close ups of the HRA figured walnut on their standard version.

 

 

Both Henry.jpeg

Henry stocks.jpeg

both barrels.jpeg

Henry stock l.jpeg

henry stock r.jpeg

Edited by Tuolumne Lawman 6127
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