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The Aussie Humour Thread


Buckshot Bear

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2 hours ago, John Kloehr said:

OK, Brisbane to Nicholson would require 94 mph to go that distance in 18 hours, I guess it is possible but need to add some additional speed to make up for the traffic stops (additional time to gracefully accept tickets).

 

At 70mph, it would require a few Red Bulls and No-Doz or whatever energy drinks and pills are legal there to do it in a day (24 hours).

Does the land of convicts worry about such things when they are chased by gizmos like this?  How long can a 300mile battery last when it starts a high speed chase halfway through a shift?

 

https://thedriven.io/2023/06/23/most-powerful-in-our-fleet-police-take-delivery-of-first-all-electric-patrol-car/

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2 hours ago, sassnetguy50 said:

We have learned of this area from The Man From Snowy River.

 

 

A lot of the times in the Aussie "Ski Season" the resorts have to have snow makers going all night, so far being a cold Winter they have gotten off to a good start this year.
Compared to say Whistler Colorado.....well there really ain't a comparison. 

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2 hours ago, sassnetguy50 said:

Does the land of convicts worry about such things when they are chased by gizmos like this?  How long can a 300mile battery last when it starts a high speed chase halfway through a shift?

 

https://thedriven.io/2023/06/23/most-powerful-in-our-fleet-police-take-delivery-of-first-all-electric-patrol-car/

 

 

I reckon there'd be some hoon convicts that would just love to make a name for themselves and beat one of those gizmos. 

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Australian History Morning Slang - todays word is:
Australian Slang For Sausage (Explained!)
In Australia, sausages are called either “snags” or “bangers”, most commonly.
Snag is by far the most common and can refer to just about any kind of sausage including basic sausages and even hot dogs.
Bangers is less common, and a term borrowed from Britain, but still very popular in Australia.
The Australians have a couple of slang words for sausages, then, and they may well use other international terms here and there.
By far the most common slang terms in Australia for sausage, though, are snag and banger.
Let’s find out more.
Australians have a handful of different slang terms for sausage.
Without doubt, the most common, universal, and most widely understood slang term for sausage in Australia is “snag”.
This term refers to just about any kind of sausage.
They are all snags.
Most commonly, though, this term is used for simple, stand-alone sausages—that is to say, not wrapped in pastry or on a bun.
Snags are sausages on your plate or otherwise free of embellishments.
Similarly, you have the term “bangers”.
Bangers are also any kind of sausage on their own, and this phrase is very often used in the full dish “bangers and mash”.
This is a dish of mashed potato and sausages, or bangers, a very popular dish in Britain and Australia.
Again, most people in Australia will know what you mean by bangers, even if they don’t use the term themselves.
It’s widely used across the country, though not as frequently as “snag”.
When it comes to sausages, there are a lot of different forms they might come in.
Traditional pork sausages, intended to be eaten on their own or perhaps as a sandwich—a snag sanger, as they’re called—tend to be what people mean by the term snag.
However, you’ve also got vegetarian sausages and other things like this which some might refuse to call snags, reserving that term for meat sausages.
But you’ve also got things like hot dogs and sausage rolls, so where do they fit into the equation.
I’ll answer that in full shortly, but generally, there is a distinction made between “snags” and these other kinds of sausages.
Again, snags, or indeed bangers, tend to refer to sausages that don’t come with any embellishment—whatever you might add yourself.
Where do all these terms come from, then
The word snag certainly has an interesting history, and as best we can tell, it derives from a Scots slang word.
This word was used through some parts of Britain, in both the north of England and Scotland.
The original meaning was first recorded in 1937—meaning it probably predates that in the vernacular by some time.
At first, it just meant a morsel, a very light meal—rather like “snack”, in that sense.
Eventually, that spread to Australia, particularly to the Australian football scene.
Often, things like sausage rolls were sold at games, and “snag” became a shorthand term for these cheap food items.
From there, the word took on a broader meaning and usage, and came just to mean any sausage. Indeed, many would no longer refer to sausage rolls as snags.
What about banger.
Why do Australians say banger.
The term banger is another one with an interesting history.
Though we don’t know for sure where it comes from, our most reliable account is that the term originated in the First World War.
Here, meat shortages meant that you had to fill out sausages with other items to bulk them up.
One of the items they used was simply water.
When you cook a sausage that is full of water, this will cause the sausage to explode.
Thus, they came to be known as bangers because they would literally explode.
This term caught on in Australia during the 20th Century, probably spreading first through Australian soldiers returning home.
So, is there a different term for a hot dog.
The answer is not really.
Many would say that a snag is not the right term for a hot dog.
A hot dog is just a hot dog, and there really isn’t any other term for a hot dog.
That said, the term snag is generally not used to refer to hot dogs, and is the exclusive domain of actual sausages.
However, it really depends on where you are and who you’re talking to.
Many people indeed do call hot dogs snags, still.
Again, for the most part, they will just call it a sausage roll.
Some might instead refer to it as a “sausage sizzle” or “snag sanger”, as if it were a sausage sandwich.
However, for the most part, they will again just use the term sausage roll.
Some might call it a “snag roll”, although this is very uncommon.
Much like with hot dogs, most Australians prefer to reserve “snag” for unembellished sausages, rather than savory treats of this kind.
So, banger and snag generally do the job no matter what the context.
Any kind of sausage can be a snag, and this is a good deal more common than banger.
Banger, nonetheless, is still widely used though perhaps in a narrower context, generally speaking.
In any case, if all you need is a simple, catch-all term for sausage that will be understood by most Australians, then look no further than snag.
 
450369277_10160281516293553_5900659448552434519_n.jpg.3395bb093fb7980d47a23d8e1065cf46.jpg
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39 minutes ago, Buckshot Bear said:
Australian History Morning Slang - todays word is:
Australian Slang For Sausage (Explained!)
In Australia, sausages are called either “snags” or “bangers”, most commonly.
Snag is by far the most common and can refer to just about any kind of sausage including basic sausages and even hot dogs.
Bangers is less common, and a term borrowed from Britain, but still very popular in Australia.
The Australians have a couple of slang words for sausages, then, and they may well use other international terms here and there.
By far the most common slang terms in Australia for sausage, though, are snag and banger.
Let’s find out more.
Australians have a handful of different slang terms for sausage.
Without doubt, the most common, universal, and most widely understood slang term for sausage in Australia is “snag”.
This term refers to just about any kind of sausage.
They are all snags.
Most commonly, though, this term is used for simple, stand-alone sausages—that is to say, not wrapped in pastry or on a bun.
Snags are sausages on your plate or otherwise free of embellishments.
Similarly, you have the term “bangers”.
Bangers are also any kind of sausage on their own, and this phrase is very often used in the full dish “bangers and mash”.
This is a dish of mashed potato and sausages, or bangers, a very popular dish in Britain and Australia.
Again, most people in Australia will know what you mean by bangers, even if they don’t use the term themselves.
It’s widely used across the country, though not as frequently as “snag”.
When it comes to sausages, there are a lot of different forms they might come in.
Traditional pork sausages, intended to be eaten on their own or perhaps as a sandwich—a snag sanger, as they’re called—tend to be what people mean by the term snag.
However, you’ve also got vegetarian sausages and other things like this which some might refuse to call snags, reserving that term for meat sausages.
But you’ve also got things like hot dogs and sausage rolls, so where do they fit into the equation.
I’ll answer that in full shortly, but generally, there is a distinction made between “snags” and these other kinds of sausages.
Again, snags, or indeed bangers, tend to refer to sausages that don’t come with any embellishment—whatever you might add yourself.
Where do all these terms come from, then
The word snag certainly has an interesting history, and as best we can tell, it derives from a Scots slang word.
This word was used through some parts of Britain, in both the north of England and Scotland.
The original meaning was first recorded in 1937—meaning it probably predates that in the vernacular by some time.
At first, it just meant a morsel, a very light meal—rather like “snack”, in that sense.
Eventually, that spread to Australia, particularly to the Australian football scene.
Often, things like sausage rolls were sold at games, and “snag” became a shorthand term for these cheap food items.
From there, the word took on a broader meaning and usage, and came just to mean any sausage. Indeed, many would no longer refer to sausage rolls as snags.
What about banger.
Why do Australians say banger.
The term banger is another one with an interesting history.
Though we don’t know for sure where it comes from, our most reliable account is that the term originated in the First World War.
Here, meat shortages meant that you had to fill out sausages with other items to bulk them up.
One of the items they used was simply water.
When you cook a sausage that is full of water, this will cause the sausage to explode.
Thus, they came to be known as bangers because they would literally explode.
This term caught on in Australia during the 20th Century, probably spreading first through Australian soldiers returning home.
So, is there a different term for a hot dog.
The answer is not really.
Many would say that a snag is not the right term for a hot dog.
A hot dog is just a hot dog, and there really isn’t any other term for a hot dog.
That said, the term snag is generally not used to refer to hot dogs, and is the exclusive domain of actual sausages.
However, it really depends on where you are and who you’re talking to.
Many people indeed do call hot dogs snags, still.
Again, for the most part, they will just call it a sausage roll.
Some might instead refer to it as a “sausage sizzle” or “snag sanger”, as if it were a sausage sandwich.
However, for the most part, they will again just use the term sausage roll.
Some might call it a “snag roll”, although this is very uncommon.
Much like with hot dogs, most Australians prefer to reserve “snag” for unembellished sausages, rather than savory treats of this kind.
So, banger and snag generally do the job no matter what the context.
Any kind of sausage can be a snag, and this is a good deal more common than banger.
Banger, nonetheless, is still widely used though perhaps in a narrower context, generally speaking.
In any case, if all you need is a simple, catch-all term for sausage that will be understood by most Australians, then look no further than snag.
 
450369277_10160281516293553_5900659448552434519_n.jpg.3395bb093fb7980d47a23d8e1065cf46.jpg

I have done the same for many years but with melted cheese and mustard.  A nice light lunch.

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‘COPPERS ON CAMELS’ - 1881
IN CENTRAL AUSTRALIS LAST century, before there were four-wheel drives, police only had camels to patrol the vast distances of the desert.
First used for patrol duties by the SA police in 1881, the policing role of camels expanded in the ’40s amid calls for greater defence of the north-west, but Central Australia’s Finke Police District was still reputedly the world’s largest beat.
Spanning the remote space between Mount Dare station, Alice Springs and Mt Gosse in WA – passing Kata Tjuta (the Olgas), Uluru/Ayers Rock and Lake Amadeus – it dipped over the border into SA, where officers acted as Special Constables.
The last camel patrol
Over the years history has become muddied as is often the way with old bush tales. “It would take someone combing through the old police journals to untangle it,” says NT archivist Pat Jackson.
Anthony ‘Ned’ Kelly tells one version of the last camel patrol.
It was May 1953, and involved the pursuit of Aboriginal man Barry Mutarrubi, a suspect in the murder of an Aboriginal woman. Barry had retreated into the desert near Curtin Springs station.
Using five camels, Ned and patrol officer Les Penhall and an Aboriginal tracker known as Stanley chased Barry until he disappeared over the WA border.
Stanley and Ned caught up to Barry months later when he returned to the NT. He was tried in Darwin and served time in jail for the murder.
“The end of the camel patrols did not end the isolation of the Centre,” says historian Bill Wilson, a former Charles Darwin University lecturer who specialised in the NT police force’s exploits. “But the story of the Australian camel ‘mounties’ captured the romanticism of the outback for people all over the world.”
PHOTO - In pursuit of Barry Mutarrubi 1953
 
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1 minute ago, Buckshot Bear said:

450191592_993075035609588_5619607425366350572_n.jpg.b5fe9e5e7a3a2b6461568885b538a0d0.jpg

More than that!  My Landcruiser was a rag top.  In good weather, I'd roll up the sides and back.  One evening I took two good friends for a very mild off road session on land I was leasing.  I asked if everyone was belted in, affirmative!  Jim in the back had a beer in one hand and a cigar in the other.  First bump, and not severe, Joe looked around, "Jim is gone!"  He had popped out the back.  He was running behind with beer an cigar still in custody.  " Wait!  Wait".  He had not wanted to admit he was too large for the belt.  Wonderful luck, just bruises and a great story!

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Australian History Daily Slang - todays words are:
Whalers and Walers
Two creatures in Aussie English are pronounced identically but spelt differently.
The first is a fish and the second a horse.
The fish is the Murray cod, which is known colloquially as a “whale” because of its size.
Murray cod have been nicknamed “whales” since the 1870s.
A large specimen can weigh as much as a human (and live as long!).
There was a certain type of swaggie called a “whaler” because he followed the banks of the Murray, Darling, Lachlan or Murrumbidgee rivers, living on the cod he could catch.
The horse was called a “waler” (short for “New South Waler”) and was noted for its strength and toughness.
In World War I, Australian Light Horse troops were mounted mainly on walers – often rounded up from brumby herds and broken to harness by a team of rough riders under the command of Major ‘Banjo’ Paterson.
 
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Australian History Morning Slang - todays word is:
Stonkered
(image below - US soldiers stonkered by Aussie lingo)
“To stonker” means “to put out of action, to render useless”.
As such it derives from an earlier word, “stonk”, which meant “a concentrated artillery bombardment”.
It began as military slang coined by our World War I diggers and was probably onomatopoeic in origin, “stonk” echoing the dull thud of artillery.
Now, anything pounded by artillery has been “put out of action, or rendered useless”, hence the broader (metaphorical) use of stonkered.
An extension of that is the Australian and New Zealand use of stonkered to mean drunk.
Anyone who’s pounded their brain with enough booze to put it out of action is as stonkered as if they were a military target pounded by heavy artillery.
This can also mean “to have eaten an elegant sufficiency”.
Image: US soldiers stonkered by Aussie lingo - US sailors meet Australian soldiers and locals, share a beer and shake their heads at the local lingo during a visit to Brisbane in March 1941.
 
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‘AUSTRALIA’S LAST CONVICT SHIP’ -1868
The Blackwall Frigate Hougoumont, unloads the final 279 convicts in WA.
Australian Geographic.
IT’S A WARM SUMMER’S day on 9 January 1868 in Fremantle, Western Australia, and the last convict ship to transport prisoners to Australia is just coming in to port.
The ship had departed Portsmouth on the 12 October, with 280 convicts and 108 passengers, helmed by William Cozens.
The complement of convicts included 62 Fenians, including 17 from the military, a contingent which contravened an agreement between the United Kingdom and Western Australia, leading to a brief panic in Fremantle. The inclusion of military Fenians also flouted the UK’s unwritten policy not to transport military prisoners.
Upon seeing Australia for the first time, the prisoners no doubt feel a frisson of excitement mingled with a little fear, despite their sentences – compared to the gallows, Australia isn’t looking too bad.
It has been a relatively uneventful voyage – only one convict has died in the 89 days the ship has been at sea – but an unusual one; due to the reasonably high number of literate convicts from the complement of political prisoners from the Fenian Rising the previous year, the voyage even had its own newspaper: The Wild Goose, of which all seven handwritten issues survive in the State Library of New South Wales.
Babette Smith, historian and author of Australia’s Birthstain: the startling legacy of the convict era, says that transportation wasn’t as bad as its legacy decries. “Most of the prisoners got access to medical care and to meat,” she says. “And their children were often markedly taller and stronger.”
Some crimes were even carefully premeditated to warrant transportation with a lenient sentence as an escape from poverty in Britain, or to join family members.
Due to the high literacy rate amongst the prisoners, the voyage produced a number of diaries and accounts, notably those of Denis Cashman and Thomas McCarthy Fennell, and John Boyle O’Reilly’s letters.
This final complement of convicts signalled the end of a significant period in Australian history.
Between 1788 and 1868, more than 165,000 convicts were transported to Australia, of which 10,000 were sent to Western Australia.
By the time penal transportation ended, Australia had grown to a population of more than 1 million – compared to just 30,000 in 1821 – and it was finally large enough to be autonomous, to sustain itself and grow.
 
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COOKING DAMPER’ - 1958
A Drover’s wife cooking damper, Ursino Bore, 1958. While on the road with a mob of 3,700 Merino ewes between Tibooburra and Coonamble, Mavis helped cook for the family droving team
 
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